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Southern Illinois University Bulletin 



Southern Illinois 
University 

BULLETIN 




Volume Five 



CENTRAL PUBLICATIONS 

Southern Illinois University 

Carbondale, 1963 

v. & 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

CARLI: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois 



http://www.archive.org/details/southernillinois05sout 



Southern Illinois Uni 



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CARBONDALE CAMPUS 1963 




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IN GOD, 
IN .NATURE, 
AND.. IN ART, 



TO ADVANCE L 

IN / ; OF TRUTH 

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WITH Er!3rON$i£HJlY; 

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r KNOWl 
" TO UNDERSTANDING 

AND 
TC 4. 



1963 Summer Session 

Carbondale Campus 



June 17- August 8 
June 17- August 31 




SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

Volume 5 Number 1 January, 1963 

Second-class postage paid at Carbondale, Illinois. Published 
by Southern Illinois University, monthly except in Septem- 
ber, when published semimonthly. 



The following issues of the Southern Illinois University Bulletin 

may be obtained without charge from Central Publications, 

Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois. 

General Information 

Financial Assistance 

Summer Session (Carbondale) 

Summer Session (Edwardsville) 

Schedule of Classes (Carbondale) 

Schedule of Classes (Edwardsville) 

General Announcements (Edwardsville) 

Graduate School 

College of Education 

College of Liberal Arts .and Sciences 

School of Agriculture 

School of Applied Science 

School of Business 
School of Communications 

School of Fine Arts 

School of Home Economics 

University Institutes 

Division of Technical and Adult Education 

All intending students should have the General Information 
bulletin (issued once a year), plus the special bulletins of the 
various educational units in which they are most interested. 



Composed and printed by Printing Service 

Southern Illinois University 

Carbondale, Illinois 



Board of Trustees 



TERM EXPIRES 

John Page Wham, Chairman, Centralia 1965 

Kenneth L. Davis, Vice-Chairman, Harrisburg 1963 

Melvin C. Lockard, Secretary, Mattoon 1965 

Martin Van Brown, Carbondale 1967 

Harold R. Fischer, Granite City 1963 

Arnold H. Maremont, Winnetka 1967 

Lindell W. Sturgis, Metropolis 1965 
Ray Page (Ex-Officio), Springfield 
Louise Morehouse, Recorder 



Officers of Instruction 



Delyte W. Morris, President 

Charles D. Tenney, Vice-President for Instruction 

CARBONDALE CAMPUS 

John E. Grinnell, Vice-President for Operations 
William J. McKeefery, Dean of Academic Affairs 
Robert A. McGrath, Registrar and Director of Admissions 

Director of Summer Session Raymond H. Dey 



This Bulletin 

covers in detail questions 
concerning the 1963 Sum- 
mer Session of the Carbon- 
dale Campus. It does not 
cover all questions concern- 
ing Southern Illinois Uni- 
versity. For complete infor- 
mation about the University 
the prospective student 
should refer to the General 
Information bulletin. 



Table of Contents 



University Calendar, 1963-1964 vi 

Registration Calendar, Summer Session 1963 - - vii 

The Summer Session __ viii 

1 / General Information 1 

Units of Instruction 1 

Libraries 1 

Health Service 2 

Student Work Program 3 

Motor Vehicles 3 

Housing 3 

Recreation 5 

2 / Admission and Registration 7 

Admission 7 

Registration 8 

Initiation of Summer Registration 9 

Advisement 9 

Sectioning 9 

Fees _ 10 

Course Changes and Withdrawals from the University 10 

Class Periods 11 

Academic Load 11 

Requirements for a Bachelor's Degree 11 

3 / Special Instructional Programs 12 

Credit Courses 12 

Workshops and Short Courses 12 

Summer Institutes for High School Teachers 24 

Noncredit Courses 27 

Adult Education Short Courses 27 

Lectures and Conferences 28 

Programs for High School Students 29 

4 / Map of Carbondale Campus 32 

Alphabetical List of Buildings 32 

Numerical List of Buildings 33 

Map 34 

5 / Schedule of Classes 37 

Explanation of the Schedule 37 

The Schedule 40 

v 



University Calendar, 1963-1964 



Revised January 1963 



1963 SUMMER SESSION 



Session Begins 

Independence Day Holiday 

Final Examinations (8-week Session) 

Summer Commencements 

Final Examinations (Summer Quarter) 



Monday, June 17 

Thursday, July 4 

Wednesday-Thursday, August 7-8 

Friday, August 9 

Monday-Saturday, August 26-31 



New Student Week 
Quarter Begins 
Thanksgiving Vacation 

Final Examinations 



1963 FALL QUARTER 

Sunday -Tuesday, September 22-24 

Wednesday, September 25 

Wednesday, 12 noon-Monday, 8 A.M. 

November 27-December 2 

Wednesday-Tuesday, December 11-17 



Quarter Begins 
Final Examinations 



1964 WINTER QUARTER 

Thursday, January 2 
Wednesday-Tuesday, March 11-17 



1964 SPRING QUARTER 
Quarter Begins Wednesday, March 25 

Memorial Day Holiday Saturday, May 30 

Final Examinations Thursday- Wednesday, June 4-10 

Commencement (Edwardsville) Thursday, June 11 

Commencement (Carbondale) Friday, June 12 



Summer classes begin on Tuesday. June 18. During the fall, winter, 
and spring quarters, classes begin on the second day of the quarter. 
Evening classes (5:45 p.m. or later) on the Carbondale Campus 
begin on the first day of the quarter. 



VI 



Registration Calendar 
Summer Session, 1963 



April 10-May 31 Advance registration period for students who were en- 
rolled in the 1962 summer session or the 1963 spring 
quarter and for new and re-entry students who have 
cleared their admission status. Students will receive fee 
statements by mail if registered by May 25. Students who 
register after May 25 must pay fees at the time of registra- 
tion. 

June 13-14 Additional advance registration for students who were not 

campus enrollees during the 1963 spring quarter. 

June 7 Students will have their advance registration cancelled if 

fees are not paid at the Bursar's Office by 3:30 p.m., 
c.d.t., unless they have received approval for deferred pay- 
ment. 

June 17 Summer session begins. Last day of regular registration. 

June 18 Classes begin except for certain workshop courses which 

begin on June 17. (See Schedule of Classes) 

June 18-22 Late registration period. Late fee will be assessed. Students 

registering only for a special course which begins later than 
June 17 may register on the first meeting day of class with- 
out late fee payment. 

Last registration day without dean's written approval. 
Deadline for payment of fees by students whose fees were 
deferred. 

Last day to withdraw from school to be eligible for a re- 
fund of fees. 

Last day for refund application to be submitted to Regis- 
trar's Office for refund of fees. 

Last day to withdraw from a course without receiving a 
letter grade. 

Last day for making a program change or withdrawing 
from school except under exceptional conditions. 



vn 



June 


22 


June 


28 


June 


29 


July 


1 


July 


5 


July 


26 



The Summer Session 



the summer session at the Carbondale Campus consists of a comprehensive 
program of courses offered by most of the departments of the University. The 
program has been planned to meet the needs of the following groups: 

In-service teachers and administrators who wish to study at the under- 
graduate and graduate levels. 

Regular undergraduate and graduate students who wish to accelerate 
the completion of their degree requirements. 

High school graduates who wish to begin work toward a degree. 

Persons who wish to register for specialized courses but are not work- 
ing toward a degree. 

Persons who wish to attend special-interest conferences and lectures. 

Outstanding high school juniors and seniors who wish to participate 
in specialized noncredit programs. 

During the 1963 summer session, courses for freshmen and sophomores 
(numbered below 300) will be offered on a regular quarter basis rather than 
on an eight-week basis. The summer quarter will start on June 17 and end on 
August 30. A student, regardless of his classification, who plans to enroll in a 
100- or 200-level course will be subject to this longer period of attendance. A 
very few 100- and 200-level courses have been scheduled on an eight-week 
basis, but these will be restricted to registration by students planning to graduate 
in August, 1963. Courses above the 200-level will be offered on an eight- week 
basis starting on June 17 and ending August 8. The offering of courses on a 
regular quarter basis is contingent on the apportionment of funds by the state 
legislature. 

Students who know at the time the eight-week session opens that they must 
miss more than three days of the session should not register or, if they have 
registered in advance, should withdraw. The brevity of the summer session 
makes it difficult for students missing more than three days to complete the 
required work in time. 



VIII 



1 / General Information 



persons interested in securing complete general information about the Uni- 
versity should contact Central Publications, Southern Illinois University, Car- 
bondale, Illinois, for the General Information issue of the Souther?! Illinois 
University Bulletin. This Summer Session issue contains only those items which 
are of particular interest to the summer session. 

The central administrative offices for the University's activities at Carbondale, 
Southern Acres, and Little Grassy Lake are located at Carbondale. 

The facilities at Carbondale now include more than twenty-six hundred acres 
of land, thirty-six permanent buildings, and numerous temporary buildings. 
The Little Grassy Lake camp and Southern Acres are each about ten miles from 
Carbondale. 



UNITS OF INSTRUCTION 

The General Information issue of the Southern Illinois University Bulletin 
furnishes a complete listing of the units of instruction and the programs offered 
by each for both the Carbondale Campus and the Edwardsville Campus. A 
copy of the General Information issue may be obtained free from Central 
Publications, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois. 



LIBRARIES 

Four subject libraries (Education, Humanities, Science, and Social Studies), an 
audio-visual department, and a textbook rental service are housed in Morris 
Library. There are also branch libraries in the University School, the Voca- 
tional-Technical Institute, and at the Little Grassy Lake camp. 

Morris Library contains over 500,000 volumes plus a collection of 75,000 
maps, 2,500 phonograph records, 3,500 titles of film and about 6,000 prints, 
and a curriculum collection of some 10,000 items. With the exception of a 
small collection of rare books, the entire book collection is arranged in "open 
stacks." 

Morris Library provides a lounge for informal study and for reading current 



2 / SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

newspapers and periodicals of a general nature. Graduate students have a 
special study area and locker facilities. Group study areas are provided in each 
subject library. A browsing room, furnished informally, contains books of cur- 
rent information in many fields. A listening room permits students to use the 
record collection. Preview rooms in the audio-visual department provide for 
individual and group viewing of films. 

Facilities for use of microtext are also provided. The library staff is pre- 
pared to assist students in locating books and other materials and in giving 
instruction in the use of bibliographic tools. 

The library collection is particularly strong in American and English history 
and literature, education, the biological sciences, in modern social, political, and 
economic affairs. 

The University is one of eighteen members of the Human Relations Area 
Files, a major source of research findings in the behavioral sciences. The files, 
housed in the Social Studies Library, consist of more than one and one-half 
million documents relating to 170 world cultures. 

As part of the services of the university library system, a textbook rental 
system is operated for the benefit of students. Each quarter, students are fur- 
nished with the basic textbooks required for their courses. The books are re- 
turned at the end of the quarter, but students interested in purchasing any of 
them for their personal libraries may do so at reduced cost. 



HEALTH SERVICE 

The primary purpose of the Health Service is to cultivate in students both 
physical and emotional health. 

To serve this purpose the University maintains a well qualified staff of phy- 
sicians, nurses, technicians, and a pharmacist which serves a large and active 
out-patient clinic. Any student enrolled in the University may consult the 
Health Service, free of charge, for any illness or related problem that he or 
she may have and receive indicated diagnostic workups and treatment. Diag- 
nostic and treatment equipment include a modern laboratory, X-ray department, 
physical therapy unit, and in some instances referral to area specialists for more 
detailed diagnostic or treatment procedures. 

The Health Service maintains a modern pharmacy where students may pur- 
chase necessary drugs or medications on a cost basis on prescription from a 
University physician. 

Other services include the maintenance of immunization programs for polio, 
typhoid, diphtheria, tetanus, smallpox, and flu without charge to students. 

Detailed information concerning hospitalization, the maintenance of a Stu- 
dent Medical Benefit Fund, and procedures to be followed in the event of ill- 
ness or accident may be obtained from the Health Service. 



GENERAL INFORMATION / 3 



STUDENT WORK PROGRAM 

The Student Work Office assists students in obtaining part-time work to defray 
a portion of their educational expenses while attending Southern and to provide 
work experience which relates, if possible, to the student's academic program. 
The Student Work Office generally finds it easier to place students who enter 
for the summer quarter, because there are many job-openings occurring at this 
time. Also, students may be authorized to work more hours during the summer 
than during any other quarter. Every effort is made to place students with fi- 
nancial need in either on-campus or off-campus jobs. Inquiries relative to stu- 
dent employment should be addressed to the Student Work Office. 



MOTOR VEHICLES 

All motor vehicles owned or operated by students must be registered at the 
Student Affairs Office. 

Undergraduate students are not permitted motor vehicle driving privileges. 
However, a student may petition to the Student Affairs Office to be classified 
as an exception to the rule. 



HOUSING 

In housing students, the University has assumed the responsibility for develop- 
ing and operating facilities which provide excellent food service, comfortable 
and usable study and sleeping facilities, and adequate counseling and referral 
services. Further, Southern is experimenting with ways to fuse the experiences 
of living with those of the educational process. 

Assignments to university residential facilities are made on a first-come, first- 
served basis. One exception to this rule is that a few spaces are reserved for 
some students from other countries and those students receiving rehabilitation 
aid. 

Contracts for housing are issued only to students who have been admitted 
to the University, but admission to the University does not guarantee that 
housing will be available. The filing of an application for admission and the 
filing of an application for housing are two separate and distinct steps. 

The rates charged by the University for various housing units are established 
on the basis of current costs, and a sincere effort is made to keep these costs 
at a minimum. However, all rates for university housing are subject to change 
upon periodic evaluation of the related cost structure. 



4 / SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



University Housing for Single Students 

Thompson Point 

The Thompson Point Residence Halls are available for men during the summer 
session. The cost for room and twenty meals per week is $160 for the eight- 
week session or $240 for the summer quarter. Nonresidents may contract for 
board only at a cost of $120 for the eight-week session or $177 for the summer 
quarter. The student government also collects $3 dues for social events. 

Woody Hall 

A portion of Woody Hall is set aside for women during the summer session. 
The cost of housing and twenty meals per week is $160 for the eight- week 
session or $240 for the summer quarter. Nonresidents may contract for board 
only at a cost of $120 for the eight-week session or $177 for the summer 
quarter. The student government also collects $3 dues for social events. 

Co-operative Housing 

Co-operative housing facilities are available at Southern Acres, ten miles east 
of Carbondale. These facilities allow the residents to provide their own meals 
and to do their own janitorial maintenance. Rent is $34 for the eight-week ses- 
sion or $50 for the summer quarter. 

Group Housing 

Each of the Group Housing units, located on the shores of Campus Lake, 
provides housing for approximately 50 men or women. The international house 
for women is also located in this area. The cost of room and board is $160 
for the eight-week session or $240 for the summer quarter. Food services are 
provided at Thompson Point, in Lentz Hall. 



University Housing for Married Students 

Southern Hills Apartments 

These facilities are newly-constructed permanent accommodations for married 
students. Three types of apartments are available in this area: two bedroom, one 
bedroom, and efficiency. All Southern Hills Apartments are furnished. The rent 
for an apartment varies from $60 to $75 per month, plus a service-utility 
charge of $15 per month. 

Thompson Point Residence Halls 

A limited number of rooms will be offered in the Thompson Point Residence 



GENERAL INFORMATION / 5 

Halls for families during the summer session. Rates for each adult family mem- 
ber are comparable to single student rates. Charges for children are reduced 
on a proportional basis. 

Off -Cam pus Housing 

The University attempts to provide information concerning off-campus housing 
facilities. Lists of vacancies for single and married students are available in the 
Housing Office. Vacancies listed by the Housing Office are classified as ac- 
cepted and nonaccepted university housing. Those units which are accepted 
must meet minimum sanitation, safety, and social standards as established by 
the University. Among the listings of off-campus facilities in the Housing Office 
are those of organized houses which elect officers and carry on group activities. 
Signed contracts with householders are often required. It is suggested that 
renting by mail may not prove satisfactory. 

Few off-campus housing units offer meals. Meals may be obtained in the 
University Center cafeteria or restaurants off campus. 



RECREATION 

Carbondale is situated in a natural recreation area offering many summertime 
recreational opportunities. Approximately three miles south is the new Midland 
Hills Semi-Private Golf Course. Ten miles south is Giant City State Park, a 
popular picnic resort with scenic beauty and a lodge with overnight accommo- 
dations. 

Excellent swimming, boating, fishing, and picnic facilities are available at 
Crab Orchard Lake, Little Grassy Lake, Devil's Kitchen Lake, and Lake Mur- 
physboro. All are within a fifteen-minute drive from Carbondale. 

Located practically in the heart of the campus is the Lake-on-the-Campus. 
This facility is a recent development on the Carbondale Campus designed to 
provide recreational, social, and educational opportunities for students and fac- 
ulty members. The facilities enable an individual to enjoy the natural beauty of 
the area and a momentary break from the demanding schedule of work and 
classes. The forty-acre lake provides swimming, boating, and fishing facilities 
and is surrounded by twenty-five acres of woods with picnic areas, two miles of 
lighted paths, and recreational games areas. The swimming area is chlorinated 
in order to provide the utmost safety to those using it. Many special activities 
are scheduled at the lake each summer, such as bike hikes, watermelon feasts, 
bonfires, song fests, musicals, weiner roasts, faculty-student picnics, canoe races, 
swimming races, fishing derbys. Since fishing is one of the most popular activi- 
ties at the lake, it has been adequately stocked with large-mouth bass, bluegill, 
and sunfish. Twenty fishing piers have been constructed that extend into the 



6 / SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

lake to provide safe casting. Geodesic domes, designed by Professor R. Buck- 
minster Fuller, shelter the five major picnic areas; in each area, tables, electrical 
outlets, wood supply, and waste containers are provided. Recreational equip- 
ment such as softballs, volleyballs, horseshoes, and fishing tackle is available 
for check-out free of charge to the students at the boatdocks. Boats, canoes, and 
bicycles are also available at a minimum charge. Many University departments 
use the area to supplement classroom work. 

During the summer session, group trips are planned to attend the St. Louis 
Municipal Opera and to visit various historical sites in Southern Illinois. Swim- 
ming and intramural recreation programs are sponsored by the physical educa- 
tion departments. Outdoor square-dancing programs are available. Weekly free 
movies are provided by Audio-Visual Services. All of these programs provide 
suitable outlets for the students' recreational entertainment needs. 



2 /Admission and Registration 

ADMISSION 

inquiries concerning admission to the Carbondale Campus should be di- 
rected to the Admissions Office. A student seeking admission as a degree stu- 
dent on the graduate level needs to have his application and a transcript from 
each institution previously attended forwarded to the Admissions Office by the 
last Saturday in March. Otherwise he will be admitted as an unclassified stu- 
dent for the summer. A student seeking admission on the undergraduate level 
should have all necessary papers filed with the Admissions Office no later than 
May 15 so that the necessary processing work may be completed. 

Complete information relative to admission policy and procedure for under- 
graduate students will be found in the General Information issue of the South- 
ern Illinois University Bulletin. Graduate students should refer to the Graduate 
School issue. 

Admission items of specific application to the summer session and which will 
not be found in the General Information issue apply (1) to the undergraduate 
student attending another institution and who expects to graduate therefrom 
and who desires to attend Southern during the summer session only, (2) to a 
former student of Southern who plans to attend the summer session, and (3) 
to the high school senior who ranks in the lowest third (lower half for out-of- 
state students) of his graduating class who is permitted to enter (on scholastic 
probation) for the summer quarter. In the first case the student will be admit- 
ted as an unclassified student on the basis of a letter of good standing from the 
registrar of the institution the student is attending. In the second case a former 
student who attended the 1962 summer session and was in good standing at 
the close of the session need not apply for re-entrance clearance prior to ad- 
visement and registration for the 1963 summer session. In the third case the 
student must have registered for a minimum of 10 quarter hours during the 
summer quarter, and he must have completed his summer course work with a 
C average or better in order to continue in attendance during the fall quarter. 
Otherwise, he must remain out of school until the winter quarter. 

Social Security Identification Number 

Effective with the 1964 summer session, a student seeking admission to the 
University will need to present a social security number for identification pur- 

7 



8 / SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

poses. Your local social security office will help you obtain a number, replace a 
lost card, or answer any social security question. At Carbondale, the social se- 
curity office is at 1007 West Main Street. 

Required Tests 

Each entering freshman to Southern Illinois University must furnish the Uni- 
versity with scores on the test battery administered by the American College 
Testing Program (a.c.t.). These tests are given at regional test centers through- 
out the United States in November, February, and April. Information and ap- 
plication blanks are normally available through the high school guidance direc- 
tor or principal, or may be obtained by writing directly to the American Col- 
lege Testing Program, Box 168, Iowa City, Iowa. 

An Illinois student should apply to take the Strong Vocational Interest Blank 
when he applies to take the a.c.t. tests. The total fee for the a.c.t. tests with 
the interest blank is $4. 

Admission to the University is not based on these tests unless the student is 
in the lowest one-third of his high school graduating class (lower one-half for 
out-of-state applicants). 

These test scores will be used, along with other criteria, in connection with 
such functions as course placement, the awarding of scholarships, selection of 
honor plan students, and counseling. 

A student who finds it impossible to take the a.c.t. tests may have scores 
from the College Entrance Examination Board (c.e.e.b.) submitted. The spe- 
cific scores which must be submitted if the c.e.e.b. tests are substituted are 
Scholastic Aptitude Test (s.a.t.), English Composition Test, and Mathematics 
(Intermediate) Test. To provide comparable test data, a student who submits 
c.e.e.b. test data will be asked to submit scores from the a.c.t. and the Strong 
Vocational Interest Blank no later than one month after registration. 

A transfer student must furnish test scores to the Counseling and Testing 
Center. If the student has previously taken the a.c.t. tests, a transcript of these 
scores is available by sending one dollar and a written request to the American 
College Testing Program, Box 168, Iowa City, Iowa. If scores from similar 
tests are on file at the former school, a request should be made for their for- 
warding. (Such scores are not normally sent with a person's transcript of grades 
and must be requested separately from the appropriate office at the former 
school.) If no tests have been taken, the student should arrange to take the 
a.c.t. tests. 



REGISTRATION 

The Carbondale Campus uses a central advisement and an advance registration 



ADMISSION AND REGISTRATION / 9 

system. The advance registration period for the 1963 summer session is from 
April 10 through May 31 and on June 13 and 14. Summer session students 
should make every effort to consult their academic advisers and register during 
the advance registration period. Otherwise, they might not be able to secure 
needed, or desired, courses. 

Initiation of Summer Registration 

Undergraduate Students in attendance at Carbondale during the 1962 
summer session or the 1963 spring quarter should initiate the registration 
process by reporting to the Academic Advisement Center, 1218 South Thomp- 
son Street. Off-campus students should write in advance for an appointment. 

A student who has taken work from Southern (Carbondale Campus) either 
in residence or through extension but who was not in residence during the 
1962 summer session or the 1963 spring quarter must contact the Admissions 
Office for clearance prior to registration. 

A new undergraduate student must contact the Admissions Office to be ad- 
mitted. 

A student who is currently attending or who last attended the University 
at the Edwardsville Campus and who plans to attend the Carbondale Campus 
during the 1963 summer session needs to initiate his registration process by 
contacting the Admissions Office. At that time he needs to have either an offi- 
cial transcript of his Southern record or a letter of good standing from the 
registrar at the Edwardsville Campus. This needs to be done prior to his at- 
tempt to register. 

Graduate Students should follow the procedure outlined above, except 
that graduate students who attended the Carbondale Campus daring the 1962 
summer session or the 1963 spring quarter should initiate the registration 
process by reporting to the Graduate School office, 309 West Mill Street. 

Advisement 

Academic advisers are available by appointment throughout the advance regis- 
tration period, but June 13 and 14 and Saturday mornings are reserved for stu- 
dents who were not on campus during the 1963 spring quarter. 

Sectioning 

Following advisement, registrations are processed at the Sectioning Center, 1218 
South Thompson Street. The Sectioning Center is open from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 
p.m., Monday through Friday, April 10 through May 31. Registrations will also 
be processed until noon on Saturdays during this period and on June 13 and 14 



EIGHT-WEEK 


QUARTER 


$31.50* 


$42.00* 


7.15 


9.50 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 


5.00 



10 / SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

for students who were not on campus during the 1963 spring quarter. On May 
25, registrations will not be processed after 11:30 a.m. 



Fees 

The fee schedule for an eight-week summer session and a regular quarter is 
as follows: 

REGULAR FEES 

Tuition 

Student Activity Fee 
University Center Fee 
Book Rental Fee 

$48.65* $61.50* 

* Out-of-state students pay an additional $37.50 or $50.00. 

A student taking six hours or fewer during the eight-week session and 
eight hours or fewer during the regular quarter pays half tuition and book 
rental fee, full university center fee, and has an option on paying the student 
activity fee. 

Other special fees or deposits as listed in the General Information issue will 
be assessed when applicable. 

In the event a student enrolls in both eight-week and regular quarter classes 
his tuition and fees will be assessed on the quarter basis as listed above. 

Students attending under state teacher-education, military, or general-assem- 
bly scholarships are required to pay the University Center Fee and the Book 
Rental Fee. Veterans attending under Public Laws 16 and 894 are not required 
to pay any of the regular fees. Students attending under Public Law 550 are 
required to pay fees, both regular and special, and may not use military schol- 
arships for waiving payment of fees. 

Course Changes and Withdrawals from the University 

A prescribed procedure must be followed by a student who desires to change 
his program or to withdraw from the University while the period for which he 
has registered is in progress. Failure to follow the official procedure will re- 
sult in academic penalty. 

No student may make a program change until he has paid his fees. 

Program changes by an undergraduate student must be initiated with his 
academic adviser. Changes by a graduate student must be approved by the 
chairman of the student's advisory committee and the dean of the Graduate 
School. Program changes may be made after the student has paid his fees, but 
no changes will be accepted at the Sectioning Center on June 17. Program 



ADMISSION AND REGISTRATION / 11 

changes made for reasons other than "for the convenience of the University" 
will carry a $2 fee. 

Official withdrawal from the University is initiated at the Student Affairs 
Office. A student who officially withdraws on or before June 29 may obtain a 
full refund of fees provided his application for a refund is submitted to the 
Registrar's Office not later than July 1. Otherwise, no refund is permitted. 

Class Periods 

Class periods for classes scheduled on the eight week basis are seventy-five min- 
utes in length with ten minutes allowed between consecutive class periods. 
Classes start at 7:30 a.m., c.d.t. 

Class periods for classes scheduled on the regular quarter basis are fifty min- 
utes in length with ten minutes allowed between consecutive periods. Classes 
start at 8:00 a.m., c.d.t. 

Academic Load 



Normal academic load 
Maximum academic load 
Maximum if on probation 
Minimum for full-time 



EIGHT-WEEK 

10-12 hours 

14 hours 

10 hours 

8 hours 



QUARTER 

16 hours 
21 hours 
14 hours 
12 hours 



Requirements for a Bachelor's Degree 

Students seeking a bachelor's degree at the Carbondale Campus are referred 
to page 46 of the 1962-63 General Information bulletin. This bulletin may be 
obtained at Central Publications, 113 E. Grand, Carbondale. Students who ma- 
triculated in a university prior to the 1962 summer session are to complete the 
requirements as listed on page 46 and also the specific course requirements as 
listed on pages 58-60. Students who started their college programs with the 
1962 summer session are to meet the course requirements as outlined under 
General Studies, pages 47-56. 



3 / Special Instructional Programs 



Listed in this section are programs of special interest to high school juniors 
and seniors, recent high school graduates, regular college students, and part- 
time students who may or may not be working toward a degree. Among the 
special programs are field courses, institutes, workshops, short courses, lectures, 
and conferences. Both credit and noncredit programs are listed. 



CREDIT COURSES 

Students may register for the credit courses during the advance registration pe- 
riod from April 10 through May 31 and on June 13 and 14. Students may also 
register on June 17, the opening date of the summer session. Students register- 
ing only for a special course which begins later than June 17 may do so at the 
first meeting of the course without late fee payment. 

Fees for the special credit-courses are assessed on the same basis as fees for 
regular courses. (See "Fees" in chapter two of this bulletin.) 



Workshops and Short Courses 

Agricultural Industries 

Agricultural Prices (Agricultural Industries 452-4) June 17-July 12, 
Monday through Friday, 10:20-1:00. Fluctuations in the general price level, 
causes and stabilization policies as they affect agriculture. Price determination 
including the measurement of supply and demand, elasticity, and the theory of 
price stabilization as applied to agriculture. Prerequisites: Economics 205 and 
consent of instructor. 

Seminar (Agricultural Industries 581-1) June 17-July 12, Thursday, 
7:30-10:10. In this course the students will work on a common problem in 
agricultural economics. 

Art 

Drawing Workshop (Art 441-8) Four weeks to be arranged. For ad- 
vanced students who wish to develop and deepen their ideas. Each student will 

12 



SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMS / 13 

meet by appointment with the instructor. Problems will be dealt with as they 
arise. Discussion will then involve the student dialectically with the great form- 
ing notions of the masters, past and present. 

Economics 

The Economic Education Workshop (Economics 490-4 or Secondary 
Education 490-4) August 12-23, Monday through Friday, 8:55-11:35 and 
1:10-3:50. Detailed information appears under "Secondary Education" in this 
chapter. 

Educational Administration and Supervision 

Seminar in Comparative Education: Soviet Russia (Educational Admin- 
istration and Supervision 502S-4) July 15-August 9, Monday through Thurs- 
day, 1:10-3:45. A study of Soviet education in historical, cultural, political, 
philosophical, and world perspective. Special emphasis will be placed on edu- 
cation in communist morality and the creation of the "New Soviet Man." The 
course will also include a sober consideration of the challenge to American 
education and of the issue of the study of communism in our schools. Un- 
derlying the entire course will be the question of the roles of organized educa- 
tion in two profoundly different societies — the Soviet Union and the United 
States of America. The instructor, Professor George S. Counts, reads and speaks 
Russian and is the foremost authority on Soviet education. 

Workshop in School-Public Relations (Educational Administration and 
Supervision 563-4) June 17-July 11, Monday through Thursday, 1:10-3:45. 
For teachers, supervisors, and administrators who are interested in public rela- 
tions. Avenues for improving public relations will be explored. The instructor 
will be Visiting Professor Clyde R. Miller, who has devoted many years to 
study, writing, and practice in this field. He has served as consultant to many 
school systems. 

Elementary Education 

Aero-Space Education Workshop (Elementary Education 402-4 or Sec- 
ondary Education 402-4) August 12-23, Monday through Friday, 8:55-11:35 
and 1:10-3:50. See "Secondary Education" for details. 

Improvement of Instruction in Arithmetic (Elementary Education 
415-3) July 22-August 9, Monday through Friday, 1:10-3:50. The instructor 
will be Dr. Cleo Carter. Emphasis will be given to new instructional practices, 
materials of instruction, methods of providing for the gifted, and means of 
evaluating achievement. The workshop is open to both graduate and senior col- 
lege students and is planned particularly to meet the needs of in-service and 
prospective teachers. Students should bring with them the new state guide. 



14 / SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



Workshop in Elementary Education (Kindergarten-Primary ) (Elemen- 
tary Education 433-4) July 1-26, Monday through Friday, 8:55-11:35. For 
in-service and pre-service kindergarten and first-grade teachers who wish to im- 
prove the educational program for young children by studying problems related 
to school beginners, curriculum, administrative procedures, evaluation and par- 
ent education, and the implications of the needs of four-, five-, and six-year-old 
children as they are related to the school program. Library facilities and the 
facilities of the University School will be drawn upon to furnish background 
for discussion of current issues. Much time will be devoted to group and in- 
dividual observation in the University School. Dr. Rebecca Baker is the instruc- 
tor. Staff of the University will be made available for discussion and consulta- 
tion wherever needed. 

Workshop in Elementary School Foreign Language Instruction (Ele- 
mentary Education 435-4 or Foreign Language 435-4) June 17-July 12, Mon- 
day through Friday, 7:30-11:45. This workshop is offered in co-operation with 
the Department of Foreign Language. See "Foreign Languages" for details. 

Language Arts in the Elementary School (Elementary Education 542-3) 
July 23-August 9. The first meeting of the course will be on Tuesday, July 23. 
It will meet through Friday. The second week, Monday through Friday, 8:55- 
11:35. Dr. Ted Ragsdale is the instructor. This workshop is designed to meet 
the needs of elementary teachers in improving the instructional program in 
handwriting, spelling, and language throughout the elementary school. Students 
will choose, in terms of their interests, an area or areas in the above language 
arts for special study. 

Food and Nutrition 

School Lunch Program (Food and Nutrition 248-2) June 17-21, Mon- 
day through Friday, 9:00-12:00 and 1:00-4:00. This course will be of value 
to all interested in the school lunch program. It will include up-to-date infor- 
mation on quantity food production, use of the school lunch room for emer- 
gency feeding, equipment, sanitation, management, and personnel relationships. 
It will not be a duplication of Food and Nutrition 249, which was offered last 
summer. It will be conducted by Miss Henrietta Becker. 

Foreign Languages 

Workshop in Elementary School Foreign Language Instruction (Ele- 
mentary Education 435-4 or Foreign Language 435-4) June 17-July 12, Mon- 
day through Friday, 7:30-11:45. This course is open to seniors and to all those 
who plan to teach a foreign language at the elementary level. Special attention 
will be given to the problems of teachers who are using television foreign-Ian- 



SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMS / 15 

guage programs. The morning periods will alternate discussions of methods and 
materials with oral drill sections in French, German, and Spanish. Students may 
observe children's classes in those languages each morning. The course will in- 
clude also teaching films and lectures by visiting personnel. The course may be 
repeated for a total of eight hours. 

Intermediate Course (German 201-3, 202-3, and 203-3) Summer study 
in Germany. A six-week, concentrated, study program close to one of West- 
Germany's cultural centers and a subsequent two-week study tour of the coun- 
try and West-Berlin under the guidance of the instructor provide the partici- 
pants with the equivalent of the second-year college German sequence. In ad- 
dition, being in a genuine German environment will result in a better apprecia- 
tion of the cultural matrix involved and will furnish greater opportunities to 
apply the German learned. 

The participants will meet for 3 hours in the morning and 2 hours in the 
afternoon for formal instruction Monday through Friday. To assure continuous 
use of German by the participants the instructor will accompany them during 
many of the extra-curricular activities. 

The course will be held at Jugenheim an der Bergstrasse, on the western 
slopes of the Odenwald Mountains. Jugenheim, in the upper Rhine valley, is 
also the locale of a teacher training institute. The participants will be 25 miles 
south of Frankfurt-on-the-Main and 25 miles north of Heidelberg. Thus they 
are ideally located for weekend excursions to historical and cultural sites. 

Dr. Hellmut A. Hartwig, professor of German at Southern Illinois Univer- 
sity, will be in charge of the program. He will be aided by Mrs. Hartwig in 
an unofficial capacity. 

The group will leave on a chartered flight from St. Louis, Missouri, on June 
17. After a few days of sightseeing in London they will travel to Jugenheim 
for the six-week formal course. After the two-week study tour the students will 
have a leisure period of nine days for individual sightseeing. On August 26 
they will return from Paris to St. Louis. 

Prerequisite for the course is one year of college German or two years of 
high school German. Acceptance will depend on scholarship in German and 
the consent of the instructor. 

Persons interested in the course should contact Dr. Helmut LiedlofF, Depart- 
ment of Foreign Languages, as soon as possible since only a limited number 
of students will be accepted on a strict priority basis. Participants have to make 
their own arrangements regarding reservation on the charter flight. 

The approximate basic cost of $850-900 includes every foreseeable expense 
(such as transatlantic roundtrip flight, travel in Europe, room and board). 
A down-payment of $50 has to be made with the application. If a participant 
finds it necessary to withdraw from the course, no refund will be made unless 
the student can provide a substitute. 



16 / SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



Travel-Study Course in Mexico (Spanish 360). This course is offered in 
conjunction with the Summer Study Abroad Program of the Latin American 
Institute and will consist of two and one-half weeks of travel and study in 
Mexico preceding registration at the University of Guanajuato, where the group 
will attend classes for six weeks. The two programs will carry a maximum of 
twelve hours of credit (3 from Southern, and 9 from the University of Guana- 
juato). 

Spanish 360 is open to all students who have completed Spanish courses at 
the second-year college level. Applications will be accepted from students who 
cannot qualify for Spanish 360, and if accepted they may register for Spanish 
classes beginning at the elementary level at the University of Guanajuato, but 
preference will be given those participants taking the complete program. 

Students will travel by auto, leaving Carbondale on June 16 and returning 
about August 13. Lectures will be given by the director at various points en 
route, as well as at Guanajuato; and the group will have the services of special 
guides and professors while in Mexico City for one week. 

The fee for the combined Travel-Study and Summer Study Abroad programs 
has been set at $425 and will include transportation, lodging, and guide service, 
plus academic fees and meals at Guanajuato (but not elsewhere). A prelim- 
inary registration fee of $50 is due not later than April 15, with the balance 
due not later than May 15. In addition, students in Spanish 360 will be sub- 
ject to one-half the regular summer registration fee at Southern. 

Enrollment will be limited to eighteen, and applications will be accepted on 
a strict priority basis. The institute and the director of the study group jointly 
reserve the right to accept or reject applicants. Students may contact Mr. Basil 
C. Hedrick, Latin American Institute. 

Geography 

Workshop in the Teaching of Geography (Geography 480-4) June 17- 
June 28, Monday through Friday, 8:55-11:35 and 1:10-3:50. This workshop 
will give information, techniques, skills, and practice to help teachers in geog- 
raphy and social studies classes. Dr. Clarence B. Odell, managing editor of 
Denoyer Geppert Company and author of Successful Teaching with Globes and 
Successful Teaching with Maps will be guest lecturer for one week. Gradation 
of geographic materials will make this course useful for elementary as well as 
junior-high teachers. Dr. Odell's services are a contribution of the Geographi- 
cal Research Institute, a division of Denoyer Geppert Co. 

Government 

Development of German Democracy (Government 454-8). For the 
fourth consecutive summer, Southern Illinois University in co-operation with 
the University of Hamburg is sponsoring an overseas course. This program of 



SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMS / 17 

government study abroad is an on-the-spot case study. Attention is given to the 
influence of German history upon present-day problems, the implications of 
the new post war Constitution of the Federal Republic of (West) Germany, 
and the rise of an economic, social, and political European Community of 
which West Germany is an integral part. All lectures are in English, and 
knowledge of the German language is by no means essential. 

Unless students make other arrangements, they will leave St. Louis by air on 
June 17. A few days will be spent in England before class sessions begin in 
Hamburg on June 24. Students will be placed as soon as possible in private 
homes of English-speaking German residents of Hamburg. Classes will be of- 
fered on the campus of the University of Hamburg, with the final examination 
being given on August 2. This will allow for three weeks during which the 
student may travel on his own or as a part of a group before the charter flight 
leaves Paris on August 26 to return to St. Louis. 

This class will be taught by Carl L. Schweinfurth, lecturer in Southern's 
government and history departments. Mr. Schweinfurth has been in Europe 
four times previously and is enthusiastic about the value of studying there. He 
will serve primarily as a co-ordinator. Distinguished professors of the Univer- 
sity of Hamburg and high officials of the government of Germany will be 
guest lecturers and will supply a goodly part of the factual material of the 
course. Classes will meet mornings and afternoons, Monday through Friday, 
leaving weekends for optional excursions to nearby points of interest. (For the 
past several years, the German Government invited the class to Berlin for one 
of the most memorable weekends during the course.) 

It is estimated that the course will cost approximately $900. This includes 
all foreseeable necessary expenses for the period of the course. This is, of course, 
no guarantee that a student would not spend more. The estimate includes 
cost of the charter flight, Southern's regular fees, and living expenses in Ham- 
burg, which are quite moderate by American standards. 

Admission to the course is with the consent of the American professor and 
all inquiries should be directed to Carl L. Schweinfurth or Professor Orville 
Alexander, Chairman, Department of Government. 

Guidance 

Placement Counselor Training Program (Blind) (Guidance 481-6) 
June 24-July 26, Monday through Friday, 8:30-11:45 and 1:30-4:45. Spon- 
sored by the Rehabilitation Institute in co-operation with the Federal Office of 
Vocational Rehabilitation, this course is designed primarily for those workers 
already employed in the field of rehabilitation of blind persons. 

Particular emphasis is given to practicum assignments in demonstration, ob- 
servation, job analysis and variations of role-playing and/or sociodrama. The 
third week of the course is devoted to field work in a metropolitan area ob- 
serving a variety of occupations which can be done without sight. 



18 / SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

Application for admission and a traineeship stipend may be made through 
regional offices of the Federal Office of Vocational Rehabilitation, or sent di- 
rectly to the Co-ordinator, Placement Counselor Training Program (Blind), Re- 
habilitation Institute, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois. 

Institute for Rehabilitation Personnel (Guidance 481-4) August 18-30, 
Monday through Friday, 7:30-3:50. Sponsored by the Rehabilitation Institute, 
this course is designed primarily for those workers already employed in the 
broad field of rehabilitation. Emphasis will be placed upon the scope of re- 
habilitation, services available to the handicapped, skills inherent in the rehabili- 
tation process, and methods of mobilizing professional and community resources 
to meet the needs of the disabled. 

The Illinois Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, the Illinois Tuberculosis 
Association, the Illinois Department of Mental Health, the Illinois Public Aid 
Commission, and the Illinois State Employment Service are co-operating with 
the University in conducting this institute. There are other state and private 
agencies participating in the program. Prominent speakers from Southern Illi- 
nois University, other universities, rehabilitation agencies, and state and federal 
offices will participate. 

Students will be admitted only by special permission of a committee. The ad- 
mission procedure will be outlined in an advanced announcement of the insti- 
tute. For additional information, contact Dr. Guy A. Renzaglia, Director, Re- 
habilitation Institute. 

Health Education 

Workshop in Driver Education and Traffic Safety (Health Education 
415S-4) July 15-August 9, Monday through Friday, 1:10-4:30. For pre-serv- 
ice and in-service teachers of driver education and traffic safety. Workshop 
participants will be given the opportunity for exchange of ideas with staff and 
consultants. 

Consultants from national and state agencies will present lectures and dem- 
onstrations. There also will be time for individual problems, group discussions, 
and opportunity for review of current philosophy and methods in the teaching 
of traffic safety education. Prerequisite: Health Education 302S or consent of 
workshop director. 

Workshop in School Health Education (Health Education 461-4, 
462-4, or 463-4) June 17-July 12, Monday through Friday, 1:10-4:30. The 
workshop is open to senior and graduate students and to others by special per- 
mission of the workshop director. 

The workshop will provide the opportunity for work and participation in 
school health instruction, school health services, school health environment and 
administration. Lectures will be given by Southern Illinois University staff mem- 



SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMS / 19 

bers and outside specialists. Students will take part in group workshop sessions, 
consider individual school health problems, participate in group discussions, 
have a preview of audio-visual aids, evaluate teaching materials, and see dem- 
onstrations and have practice in testing and screening for health. The workshop 
has been designed for public school teachers, school nurses, school administra- 
tors, and health educators. 

Workshop in Alcohol Education (Health Education 464-4) June 17- 
July 12, Monday through Friday, 1:10-4:30. An opportunity for teachers and 
school administrators who are responsible for, or interested in, alcohol education 
programs to meet with persons who have technical knowledge about alcohol. 
The purpose of the workshop will be to explore methods of improving alcohol 
education. Current factual information on what is known about alcohol will be 
presented. Participants will examine this body of knowledge and determine what 
is suitable for teaching at the various grade levels. Also, attention will be given 
to some of the problems arising from teaching about alcohol and effective 
methods of presenting the information. 

The Illinois Department of Mental Health, Division of Alcoholism is co- 
operating with the University in conducting this program. 

Home and Family 

Workshop on Problems of the Nursery School (Home and Family 
407-2, Section 1) July 1-5, Monday through Friday, 9:00-4:00. This work- 
shop will be led by Dr. Michael Zunich. The Child Development Laboratory 
of the School of Home Economics will serve as the location for the workshop. 
This workshop will be of extreme interest to directors and the personnel of 
nursery schools and day care centers, to students of child development and 
nursery education at the senior and graduate levels, and to home economics 
personnel. The major objective of this workshop is embodied in its title, with 
special emphasis in understanding what factors seem to be important in estab- 
lishing and maintaining a successful nursery school. 

Workshop on the Maintenance and Operation of the Nursery School 
(Home and Family 407-2, Section 2) July 8-12, Monday through Friday, 
9:00-4:00. This workshop, led by Dr. Michael Zunich, meets in the Child 
Development Laboratory in the School of Home Economics. The major objec- 
tives will be to emphasize the maintenance and operation of a nursery school 
and day care center. Lecture-demonstrations, group discussions, films, and read- 
ings will constitute the major segments of the program. The following specific 
topics will be covered: equipment and supplies; policies (including health 
rules, fire regulations, insurance, fees) ; parent-school relationships; food 
(menus, portions); teaching techniques (books, stories, music); tests and meas- 
urements (including reports on children's progress). 



20 / SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

Work Simplification in Home Management (Home and Family 435—4) 
July 15-August 9, Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday, 7:30-10:10. This 
will be a study of basic work-simplification principles and their application 
to full-time, employed, and physically handicapped homemakers. The course 
will be open to graduate students and undergraduate students with senior 
standing. It should be of particular interest to home economists in teaching, 
extension, or business, to workers in rehabilitation programs, and to anyone 
who is interested in improving methods of work. Dr. Betty Jane Johnston will 
be the instructor. 

Home Economics Education 

Workshop: Evaluation in Homemaking Education (Home Economics 
Education 507-2) June 17-28, Monday through Friday, 9:00-4:00. For home 
economics teachers who wish to do concentrated work in clarifying values and 
developing effective ways of appraising progress toward the achievement of 
significant values. Evaluation of programs and student progress. Resource 
people will be used. Miss Anna Carol Fults will be the instructor. 

Trends in Home Economics Education (Home Economics Education 
515-4) June 17-July 12, Monday through Thursday, 1:10-3:50. An examina- 
tion of recent trends in this field. Accepted for qualifying those who are re- 
turning to teaching positions after having been out of teaching for a number 
of years. Junior, senior high school, adult education, and college levels are in- 
cluded. Mrs. Anne Chase is the instructor. 

Methods and Materials for Adult Programs in Home Economics (Home 
Economics Education 517-4) July 15-August 9, Monday through Thursday, 
1:10-3:50. Program planning, developing materials, examining resources, 
means of teaching and evaluating adult programs. Current research in continu- 
ing education. Present day challenges relating to job training in the homemak- 
ing field. 

Industrial Education 

New Developments in Industrial Education (Industrial Education 560-2 
or Secondary Education 560-2) four days each week, 10:20-11:35 and 1:10- 
2:25. Students may register for a two-week intensive course at four different 
periods during the summer session, thus earning from two to eight hours of 
credit. The subject deals with significant developments, pressing problems, and 
emerging trends in the industrial education and technical fields. Selected sub- 
jects are handled by recognized authorities in the field. 

Outstanding specialists have been selected to present lectures on the newer 
developments as they have become apparent during the past scholastic year. The 
subjects and the schedule of presentation follow: 



SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMS / 21 

Program Development and Improvement Through June 18-27 

State and Local Co-operation 
Improvement of Instruction Through Curriculum Development July 1-11 

The Most Rapidly Expanding Phase of Education — Research July 16-25 

Power Mechanics July 30- August 8 

Instructional Materials 

Classroom Teaching with Television (Instructional Materials 450-3) 
August 12-16, Monday through Friday, 8:55-11:35 and 1:10-3:50. Emphasis 
is placed on the changed role of the classroom teacher who uses television. 
Evaluation of programming, technicalities of ETV, and definition of responsi- 
bilities are included. Demonstration and a tour of production facilities are pro- 
vided. 

Journalism 

High School Journalism Clinic (Journalism 420-4) July 15-27, Mon- 
day through Friday, 8:00-11:00 and 1:30-3:50. The two-week clinic is de- 
signed for newspaper advisers, yearbook advisers, or journalism teachers from 
high schools and junior colleges. Teachers may concentrate in either newspaper 
or yearbook sequences and will work directly with high school students attend- 
ing the month-long High School Communications Workshop (journalism sec- 
tion). A fully experienced school adviser will assist with instruction along with 
Department of Journalism staff members. 

Summer Workshop in Neivs Analysis in the Classroom (Journalism 
499-3) August 12-22, Monday through Friday, 9:30-12:30 and 1:30-3:30, 
evenings optional. Study of the newspaper as a teaching aid in the junior and 
senior high school and upper elementary grades with emphasis upon methods 
of helping the student to learn to employ the journalistic media in achieving 
social and economic adjustment. 

Professional newsmen will explain the procedures of gathering news from 
international, national, regional, and local sources, the editing processes and 
the various roles of the newspaper. There will also be a study of current public 
issues as a means of providing background information required for critical 
reading of news reports. Demonstrations and displays will illustrate the work of 
successful teachers working in this area. The workshop staff will include a large 
number of working newspapermen and members of the university faculty. 

Music 

Opera Workshop (Music 346-2 to 8 or 568-2 to 8) Section 1. The De- 
partment of Music is offering its eighth Annual Summer Opera Workshop, un- 
der the direction of William Taylor. The workshop may be elected for 2, 4, 6, 
or 8 hours of credit with consent of the instructor. In past summers such 



22 / SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

large-scale works as Oklahoma, Finian's Rainbow, Most Happy Fella, Carousel, 
South Pacific, and Showboat have been presented. Members of the workshop 
will be on call for rehearsals nightly from 7:00 to 10:00. Special workshop 
projects are planned for afternoon sessions on call daily from 2:30 to 4:30. 
The workshop is a medium of experience for singers, instrumentalists, actors, 
stage crews, and music or dramatic directors who wish to gain a deeper insight 
into the production problems of this type of performance. 

Opera Workshop (Music 346-2 to 8 or 568-2 to 8) Section 2. After 
operating successfully for two summers, opera workshop will be offered at Hot 
Springs, Arkansas, under the direction of Marjorie Lawrence. Students may 
elect 2, 4, 6, or 8 hours of credit with consent of the instructor. Housing will 
be available at a minimum rate at the Hot Springs ranch (for a limited number 
of students) and in the city. Normal enrollment procedure should be followed. 
Consult the chairman of the Department of Music for details. This workshop 
will offer an intensive program of vocal training and operatic coaching for 
those musicians primarily interested in the oratorio and operatic phases of mu- 
sical experience. Supplementary work in music literature and music theory will 
be offered. Several performances of outstanding oratorio and operatic excerpts 
will be given in Hot Springs and surrounding communities, culminating in a 
final concert at the end of the session. 

Elementary Music Education Workshop (Music 455-4) July 15-26, 
Monday through Friday, 9:00-12:00 and 1:30-3:30. The workshop, presented 
by Dr. Forman, assistant professor of music and a guest consultant, Miss Aleen 
Watrous, of Wichita, Kansas, meets in air-conditioned Altgeld Hall and is 
open to all elementary teachers who are concerned with teaching music in the 
classroom. 

Instrumental Materials and Techniques Workshop (Music 554-3) June 
24-July 5, Monday through Friday, 9:00-12:00. Three instructors in instru- 
mental music combine their experiences to present this workshop for interested 
instrumental teachers. The sessions are designed to give an intensive experience 
in the materials and methods of the instrumental music program at both the 
elementary and secondary levels. 

Recreation and Outdoor Education 

Under direction of the University's Department of Recreation and Outdoor 
Education, a varied instructional program will be offered at the University's 
Little Grassy Lake camp. In addition to course work in recreation and outdoor 
education, there will be courses in geology, health education, physical education, 
speech correction, and special education. 

The Department of Recreation and Outdoor Education is also offering a sum- 



SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMS / 23 

mer workshop, which may be taken for either credit or noncredit. Many sessions 
will be held at the University's Little Grassy Lake camp. Lodging and meals 
will be provided at a nominal cost. 

Playground Leadership Workshop (Recreation and Outdoor Education 
312-2) June 12-15. For recreation majors and minors and for those who de- 
sire some preparation and leadership training for playground programs, church 
programs, and youth leadership programs for the summer. 

Secondary Education 

Aero-Space Education Workshop (Secondary Education 402-4 or Ele- 
mentary Education 402-4) August 12-23, Monday through Friday, 8:55- 
11:35 and 1:10-3:50. The purpose of this workshop is to stress the importance 
of the topic of aero-space education in modern civilization. Every effort will be 
made to study well the social implications for present day society. Some of 
the most elementary questions in the scientific background of this period will 
be answered to the extent that such information is needed by the social studies 
teacher in discussing these problems. The United States Civil Air Patrol is co- 
operating with the two departments in presenting this workshop. 

The course will point out the numerous available source materials and re- 
source individuals that should be known by elementary and secondary school 
teachers. It is probable that some optional field trips will be taken. Please di- 
rect inquiries to Dr. Clarence D. Samford, Department of Secondary Education. 

Economic Education Workshop (Secondary Education 490-4 or Eco- 
nomics 490-4) August 12-23, Monday through Friday, 8:55-11:35 and 1:10- 
3:50. Dr. Thomas Martinsek of the Department of Economics and Mr. Thomas 
Curtis will serve as co-ordinators. 

The plan is to have lectures dealing with common economic problems pre- 
sented daily by outside resource people. The remainder of each day will be 
devoted to discussing the content of the lectures and suggesting implications for 
developing economic concepts in the schools' curricula, grades one through 
twelve. 

This workshop is co-sponsored by the Joint Council on Economic Education 
and Illinois Economic Councils of Education and by the departments of Sec- 
ondary Education and Economics. Schools are encouraged to send a team of 
participants. Ideally, a team would consist of a teacher from each of the grade 
levels and an administrator. However, it is possible that one teacher will be 
accepted from a school system. Please direct inquiries to Dr. Clarence D. Sam- 
ford, Chairman, Department of Secondary Education. 

New Developments in Industrial Education (Industrial Education 560-2 
or Secondary Education 560-2). See "Industrial Education" for details. 



24 / SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



Special Education 

The Gifted Child (Special Education 418-4) July 15-26, Monday 
through Friday, 8:00-3:00. 

A demonstration class will be taught by an outstanding teacher in conjunc- 
tion with the theory part of the course. The course will explore problems of 
screening and identification and will examine methods of enrichment and accel- 
eration. Major emphasis will be on teaching so that students in the workshop 
will be able to carry out programs in the local school situation. 

Theater 

Theater Practicum (Theater 322-12 or 519-12). The Department of 
Theater will conduct a summer-stock company on the Carbondale Campus this 
year. In the air-conditioned Playhouse the company will present Molnar's The 
Guardsman, O'Neill's The Great God Brown, Goldoni's The Servant of Two 
Masters, Ibsen's Rosmersholm, and Kanin's Rashomon. The departments of 
Theater and Music will co-operate in the presentation of a musical. 

Teachers, college students, and citizens of Carbondale and other Southern 
Illinois communities who wish to join the company may apply to the Depart- 
ment of Theater. With the consent of the department, applicants then need 
only register for twelve hours in Theater Practicum. Anyone interested in per- 
forming only in the summer musical should write to Mr. William Taylor, De- 
partment of Music. 

Summer-stock students learn in the most practical way directing, acting, busi- 
ness management, lighting, make-up, scenery building, and painting. Registra- 
tion for Theater Practicum and membership in the stock company must be 
completed before June 1. For further information about the summer-stock pro- 
gram, write to Dr. Sherwin Abrams, Department of Theater. 

Summer Institutes for High School Teachers 

Students enrolling in the biology or mathematics program under grants from 
the National Science Foundation pay no tuition or fees. They are not entitled 
to the special student benefits of hospitalization. They are, however, entitled 
to the normal services provided by the medical staff of the University Health 
Service. Any obligation incurred by referral to specialists for medical or dental 
care and any hospitalization expenses are to be paid for by the enrollees. Books 
and personal materials used in the institute are to be purchased by the student. 

Biology 

Southern Illinois University is one of several universities selected by the Na- 
tional Science Foundation to offer a special eight-week institute for biology 
teachers. The institute will run from June 17 through August 9. 



SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMS / 25 

The institute is designed to improve the teaching of biology in high school 
by allowing the participants to extend their preparation in subject matter. It 
should also contribute to greater mutual understanding and appreciation of 
teaching problems between secondary and college teachers. 

Under terms of the grant from the National Science Foundation, teachers 
who qualify can receive up to $75 per week plus $15 weekly for each of their 
first four dependents. In addition, they may receive a maximum of $80 travel 
allowance. Tuition scholarships will be provided by the University. Applica- 
tions for stipends may be obtained from the NSF Summer Institute for High 
School Teachers of Biology, Room 11, Life Science Building. The completed 
forms must be postmarked by February 15, 1963. 

Southern will award grants to 45-50 selected high school biology teachers. 
A special course in BSCS, Biology developed by the American Institute of Bio- 
logical Sciences, will be offered to 12-15 teachers with a more diversified back- 
ground in biology. All participants must be experienced teachers in high school 
biology who expect to continue in the profession. Grants will be made by 
April 1. 

Special institute courses will be offered in anthropology, botany, microbiol- 
ogy, and zoology. (See Schedule of Classes for specific courses.) Credit in these 
courses may apply toward the Master of Arts, Master of Science, and Master 
of Science in Education degrees. 

German 

Southern Illinois University, in co-operation with the U.S. Office of Education 
under the Language Development Program of the National Defense Education 
Act of 1958, is again sponsoring an institute for 40 secondary-school teachers 
of German. Last summer, Southern's ndea institute was one of 75 such in- 
stitutes for the purpose of upgrading the language proficiencies of foreign- 
language teachers. 

The purpose of Southern's third ndea German institute (like that of ap- 
proximately 80 other summer institutes now being organized by the U.S. Office 
of Education) is to make available opportunities to (in our case) high school 
teachers of German to increase their audio-lingual proficiency in German and 
to become better acquainted with the latest techniques and materials of instruc- 
tion. Emphasis will be placed on aural comprehension, speaking, writing; 
training in applied linguistics; proper use of the language laboratory; and a 
study and understanding of Germanic cultures. 

Under the provisions of the National Defense Education Act of 1958, pub- 
lic school teachers may receive, upon application, $75 per week plus $15 per 
week for each dependent, while in attendance at the institute. No tuition or 
other fees will be charged the participants, outside of their costs for room and 
board. A limited number of private school teachers will be selected on a no- 
tuition-and-fees basis, but they will not be eligible to receive ndea stipends. 



26 / SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

Criteria for admission: (1) at least a bachelor's degree, (2) superior schol- 
arship, (3) minimum of three years of college German or equivalent experi- 
ence, (4) an initial rating of "good" in aural-oral proficiency in German, (5) 
evidence of high potential as a teacher, excellent character, and willingness to 
speak only German at all times during the planned activities of the institute, 
(6) no previous participation in an ndea language institute, (7) reasonable 
assurance that the applicant plans to enter or continue in secondary-school 
teaching of German. 

Nine quarter hours of graduate credit will be earned by the students attend- 
ing the institute. Classes meet Mondays through Saturday mornings, June 24- 
August 9. Members of the teaching staff and all informants will reside with 
the participants at Thompson Point and assist as hosts at the German tables 
at the Lentz Hall cafeteria. The informants will also supervise the German con- 
versation during coffee breaks and all planned recreational activities. 

The core of the program will be daily lectures in German designed to ac- 
quaint the participants with Germanic cultures. Small daily conversation and 
composition classes will be taught by off-campus professors, all fluent speakers 
of German. The course on linguistics and laboratory techniques will deal with 
the principles of linguistic science and their application to language teaching 
and will provide practice in preparation of laboratory materials. Students will 
practice daily in the modern language laboratories. A high school teacher with 
experience in the "new key" methods of language teaching will demonstrate to 
participants the latest teaching methods. For the latter purpose, a high school 
class will be organized and conducted by the demonstration teacher. Several 
times a week, the participants will take part in evening programs of German 
songs, dances, movies, special lectures on topics of professional interest, etc. 

The participants will not be permitted to bring their families. 

The room and board charge includes all meals (except supper on the second 
and subsequent Sundays), the furnishing and changing of bed linens, towels, 
etc., and establishes the participants' right to park a car in a special parking lot 
and take part in the Thompson Point social activities. 

Application forms must be postmarked no later than March 1, 1963. For ad- 
ditional information and application blanks, consult Dr. Helmut Liedloff, NDEA 
Summer German Institute, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale. 

Mathematics 

A Summer Institute for High School Teachers of Mathematics (Grades 
7-12), sponsored by the National Science Foundation, June 17-August 9. The 
purpose of the institute is to improve the teaching of high school mathematics 
by improving the mathematical competence of teachers. 

Approximately fifty teachers will receive support for the institute. Stipends 
will be provided for the participants by the National Science Foundation, and 
Southern Illinois University will provide tuition scholarships. Some students 



SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMS / 27 

not receiving stipends are permitted to enroll in institute courses. For details 
on courses, see the listing under Mathematics in the Schedule of Classes. 

Applications for stipends must be submitted no later than February 15, 1963. 
Awards will be made on or about March 10. Application blanks may be ob- 
tained by writing the director of the institute, Dr. Morton R. Kenner, Depart- 
ment of Mathematics, Southern Illinois University. 



NONCREDIT COURSES 



Adult Education Short Courses 

A wide variety of noncredit adult education courses are offered by the Division 
of Technical and Adult Education. Some are described below. 

Adult Education also offers various courses which meet one night each week 
for eight weeks, in business, portrait painting, machine drafting and design, 
and home building ideas. For details, or inquiry about courses not listed, write 
to: Adult Education, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois. 

School Lunch, June 17-21. Mornings will be given over to quantity food 
products, and the afternoon sessions will deal with evaluations, sanitation, us- 
ing the school lunch room for emergency seating, and working with people. 
The sessions will be held in the Home Economics Building. They are designed 
primarily for school lunch room workers and administration. Three people from 
active and school lunch work will assist with the food preparation, and all 
meals will be prepared while on the Southern Illinois University campus by 
the students of the class. This course is offered in co-operation with the School 
of Home Economics. Tuition: $5.50, plus $2 for supplies. Housing is extra. 

Small Airports Administration Course, June 24-26. This course is de- 
signed to give members of airport authorities, airport boards, city councils, and 
county boards ideas on, and understanding of how to meet the growing chal- 
lenges of this vital field as to their responsibilities for legal liabilities, safety, 
development, financing, and action in emergencies. This course is offered jointly 
with the Transportation Institute. 

School of Advanced Cosmetology, July 22-August 3. This school, held 
in co-operation with the Illinois Hairdressers and Cosmetologists Association, 
is for owners and operators of beauty salons to learn the latest techniques and 
methods of chemistry of cosmetics, physics of hair, contest work in hairstyling, 
makeup, salon management, time and motion study, advertising, art, and color 
design; all to produce higher profits. Housing and food services are available. 



28 / SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

Youth World, August 13-16. Outstanding students selected by civic 
and professional organizations attend this course, to learn by participation the 
elements of parliamentary procedure and the application of democratic proc- 
esses. It is offered jointly with the University's Local Government Center. Total 
fee includes tuition, instructional supplies, housing, meals, and banquet. 

Illinois Banker's School, September 3-13. This two-week school, held in 
co-operation with the Illinois Banker's Association each year, is open to em- 
ployees of banks. Its purpose is to provide techniques and latest methods, 
among which are bank operation, trusts, Federal Reserve, farm and commercial 
credit, economics, speech, and accounting. 

Waterway Safety Program, September 9-1 1. This course is designed to 
study problems of, and to develop methods for combatting the hazards of, 
handling chemicals and other bulk cargoes that move by water. It is offered 
jointly with the Transportation Institute. 

Lectures and Conferences 

Each summer, as well as during the regular school year, various departments 
schedule conferences, lectures, exhibits, or clinics in co-operation with the Di- 
vision of University Extension. Several such activities have been scheduled dur- 
ing the 1963 summer session. A partial list of those that will be of particular 
interest to summer school students is provided below. 

Second National Workshop for Tennis Teachers, June 23-26. This 
workshop, designed for those who teach tennis in a group or class situation, is 
sponsored by the United States Lawn Tennis Association; the American Asso- 
ciation for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation; and Southern Illinois 
University. The workshop will feature Dr. John Hendrix, Tennis Coach, Ohio 
State University, Mr. Bill Murphy, Tennis Coach, University of Michigan, and 
Mr. Bill Price, Director, Price Tennis School, St. Louis, Missouri. Enrollment 
is limited to 100. For additional information write to Dr. John R. LeFevre, 
Intercollegiate Athletics. 

Educational Materials Exhibit, June 25-27. This is considered one of the 
outstanding exhibits of educational materials held in the midwest. Representa- 
tives of approximately one hundred publishers and distributors of educational 
materials will be available to explain their products. For further information 
contact Dr. Benson B. Poirier, Division of University Extension. 

Summer Education Conference, June 25, 26. In connection with the 
Educational Materials Exhibit, the College of Education sponsors a conference 



SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMS / 29 

dealing, with current educational problems. Noted authorities are in attendance 
to discuss and investigate the various aspects presented by the problems. Ad- 
ditional information can be obtained from Dr. J. Murray Lee, Department of 
Elementary Education. 

International Conference of Weekly Newspaper Editors, July 14-19. 
This workshop on weekly newspaper editorial policies will feature an outstand- 
ing faculty. For further information contact Dr. Howard Long, Department of 
Journalism. 

Annual Coaching Clinic, August 8, 9. Distinguished coaches in both 
football and basketball present lectures and demonstrations of the principles 
and techniques applicable to their sport. All Illinois coaches and Southern Illi- 
nois University graduates are invited to attend without charge. A small fee is 
charged other coaches. Additional information is available from Dr. Andrew 
Vaughan, Department of Physical Education for Men. 

Illinois Education Association Workshop, August 12-14. This workshop 
is designed to develop the leadership skills of those teachers who are assuming 
positions of responsibility in the Illinois Education Association. For further 
information write W. Stewart Williams, Field Associate, Illinois Education 
Association, Springfield, Illinois. 



Programs for High School Students 

Music and Youth at Southern 

The Department of Music, in co-operation with the Division of University 
Extension and with the Area Services Division, is offering a summer program 
in music for precollege students. The two-week session begins July 7 and ends 
July 20. Total fee for the period is $59, including tuition and room and board 
at University residence halls. Outstanding leaders in music education will re- 
hearse the three main performing organizations: band, chorus, and orchestra. 
An intensive musical schedule, including sectional rehearsals and private lessons, 
together with introductory listening courses in music literature will be provided. 
Musicians of high school age (including recent eighth grade graduates) are 
eligible to participate. Recreational activities will be centered around campus 
facilities, including the new University Center. Final public programs by the 
performing organizations are scheduled for the end of the session. 

National Science Foundation Programs 

Special courses for high school students with superior backgrounds will be of- 
fered during the eight-week summer session in animal ecology, anthropology, 



30 / SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

chemistry, experimental psychology, mathematics, microbiology, physics, and 
physiology. The courses are designed for high-ability students ranking in the 
upper quarter of their classes, for scholarship winners, and for students having 
special ability in science courses. The courses will be offered in units consisting 
of any three of the above fields of the student's choice. All students will attend 
daily morning lectures in the three subjects of his unit, and, in addition, will 
spend his afternoons conducting research problems under supervision in the 
course he designates as his field of major interest. 

Approximately 45 students will be chosen to attend the session starting June 
17 and terminating August 10. This program, under the support of the Na- 
tional Science Foundation, affords an excellent opportunity, for students who 
qualify, to matriculate in college-level science offerings. There is no tuition fee; 
and board, room, and travel will be awarded in full or on the basis of need to 
the selected participants. 

Any high school student who will be a junior or senior in the spring of 
1963 may apply. (Sophomores of exceptional ability will be considered only on 
a very limited basis.) Applications may be obtained from your high school or 
by writing to Dr. George H. Gass, Department of Physiology, Southern Illinois 
University, Carbondale, Illinois. 

Summer High School Workshops in Communications 

Workshops will be held in journalism, debate, theater, photography, and radio- 
television. Open to superior high school students who are currently in their 
sophomore or junior year, the workshops will run, concurrently, for a period 
of four weeks beginning July 7. High school students will live in university- 
supervised residence halls. Each of the workshops is designed to provide an en- 
riching experience for high school students interested in communications. The 
students who attend should be those who will return to their schools with at- 
titudes and skills which make for better high school programs. 

In the journalism workshop, students will learn how to produce better school 
newspaper and yearbooks. They will receive training in photography. Students 
will write and edit four issues of a workshop newspaper and a publication 
similar to a yearbook. In the last part of the workshop period they will also 
be given writing assignments for The Egyptian, Southern's student newspaper. 

The debate students study and prepare cases in the general area of the na- 
tional high school debate proposition. In this workshop, experiences are also 
provided in oratory, extemporaneous speaking, discussion, and after-dinner 
speaking. 

The theater workshop consists of work in (1) acting and production with 
emphasis on training the individual through the use of monologues, excerpts 
from plays, and other presentational activities, and (2) technical theater and 
staging. 



SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMS / 31 

The photography workshop will provide experience in taking, developing, 
printing, and editing pictures for publication. 

The radio-television workshop will provide experiences in announcing, pro- 
gramming, writing, and producing radio shows. Students in this workshop will 
use the University's radio-television facilities. Some experience will be offered 
in television production. 

Total fee for room and board and registration fee is $102.50. 

A social program of swimming, field trips, dances, horseback riding, plays, 
and picnics is also provided. 

For further information concerning any of the workshops write to Mr. Mar- 
Ian D. Nelson, Summer School High School Workshop Co-ordinator, Depart- 
ment of Journalism, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois. 



4 / Map of Carbondale Campus 



this map has been prepared primarily to help students find classrooms, offices, 
and housing. 



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF BUILDINGS 



38 Abbott Hall (K-4) 

T32 Accounting, Department of (G-6) 

T78 Adult Education (H, 1-10) 

T65 Advisement Center (H-5) 

T63 AFROTC Supply (F-7) 

26 Agriculture Building (1-5) 

3 Allyn Building (G-6) 

104 Alpha Gamma Delta (1-4) 

2 Altgeld Hall (G-7) 

T14 Alumni Service (F-6) 

T96 American Board Examiners, Psychology (1-7) 

18 Animal Building (1-6) 

5 Anthony Hall (F-6) 

42 Anthropology, Department of (F, G-8) 

57 Applied Science Laboratory (E-4) 

T87 Area Psychological Service (C-8) 

5 Area Services (F-6) 

T159 Art Annex No. 1 (C-7) 

TI82 Art Annex No. 2 (B-7) 

Tl 16 Asian Studies (M-8) 

T35 Auditor (H-6) 

28 Bailey Hall (J-4) 

39 Baldwin Hall (K-4) 

Rl Baptist Foundation (H-7) 

R2 Baptist Foundation (J 7) 

79 Beach House (J-2) 

T94 Botany and Zoology (J 6) 

T176 Botany Research (L-8) 

31 Bowyer Hall (J-3) 

33 Brown Hall (K-3) 

T34 Bursar (H-6) 

T33 Business Manager (H 6) 

T32 Business, School of (G-6) 

T145 Business, School of (Dean) (1-9) 

T106 Cartographic Office (J-5) 

T167 Center for Study of Crime, Delinquency, and ( 

T66 Central Clinical Services (J-6) 

T39 Central Mailing (H-6) 

T86 Central Publications (D-8) 

T99 Central Research Shop (1-7) 

80 Chlorination Pump House (J-2) 
R3 Christian Foundation (E, F-8) 

T85 Civil Defense (D-8) 

T105 Climatology Laboratory (J-5) 

5 Community Development Institute (F-6) 

5 Community Development Services (F-6) 

T101 Cooperative Wildlife Research (J-7) 

T100 Coordinator of Research (L-8) 

T39 Data Processing and Computing Center (H 6) 

101 Delta Chi (M-4) 

103 Delta Zeta (M-4) 

T125 Design (J-5) 

T126 Design (J, K-6) 

T128 Design (J-6) 

T129 Design (K-6) 

T149 Design Shop A (K-6) 

T150 Design Shop B (J-6) 

T151 Design Shop C (J-6) 

T152 Design Shop D (K-6) 

T155 Dewey Editorship (M-8) 

T162 Economics Annex (L-6) 

T31 Economics, Deportment of (G-6) 

T42 Education Administration (H-5, 6) 



T102 

T136 

TI96 

R5 

5 

T135 

17-137 

T29 

34 

Tl 15 

T157 

T173 

T171 

T105 

T107 

Tl 19 

T137 

177 



7 
T85 
T138 



T26 

T25 

21 

T73 

5 

T169 

T163 

T48 

T185 

35 

T124 



17 

13 
T29 
T146 
T109 
Tl 10 
Till 
H32 
T2-T9 

R4 
T106 

25 



Educational Television Research (K-7) 

Education Classrooms (H-5, 6) 

Education Classrooms (H-5, 6) 

Education, College of (Proposed) (J-8) 

Electric Sub-station No. 9 (1-6) 

English, Department of (J-9) 

English, Department of (G-9) 

English, Department of (G-9) 

English, Department of (1-9) 

Episcopal Foundation (1-10) 
Extension Service (F-6) 

Faculty Club (G-4) 

Family Housing (B, C, D- 1 , 2, 3) 

Form Quonset Machine Shop (H-4) 

Felts Hall (K-4) 

Film Production Units (L-7) 

General Improvements (B, C-7) 
Geography Annex 1 (M-7) 
Geography Annex 2 {M-7) 
Geography, Climatology Laboratory (J-5) 
Geology (K 5) 
Geology (K-6) 

Government, Department of (H-10) 
Graduate S iooI, Dean of (H-10) 
Greenhouses (16) 
Group Housing (L, M, N-3, 4) 
Guidance, Department of (J-7) 
Gymnasium (F-7) 

Health Education and Safely (D-8) 
Health Education, Deportment of (L-8) 
Health Service (D-6, 7) 
Health Service (D-7) 
Higher Education, Department of (H-10) 
Home Economics Building Group (F, G-8) 
Housing Office (G-6) 
Illinois Avenue Residence Hall (F-9) 
Industrial Education, Classroom (H-4) 

Industrial Education Offices, Classrooms, and Drafting Room (H-4) 
Industrial Education Shops (G-5) 
Industrial Education Wing, University School (1-8) 
Industrial Psychology Annex 4 (L-7) 
Information Service (F-6) 



(L-7) 



Instructional Materials Clas 

Janitorial Services (K-7) 

Journalism, Egyptian (H-4) 

Journalism Annex (K-7) 

Kellogg Hall (K-4) 

Labor Institute (1-7) 

latin American Institute (D-7) 

Laundry (E-4) 

Lentz Hall (J-4) 

Life Science Building (1-6) 

McAndrew Stadium (F-5) 

Machine Shop, Farm Quonset (H-4) 

Management (K-9) 

Marketing (J-7) 

Mathematics (J-9) 

Mathematics (J-9) 

Mens Physical Education Research (J-6) 

Mens Residence Halls (C, D-6) 

Methodist Foundation (F-9) 

Mississippi Valley Investigation (J-5) 

Morris library (1-6) 



32 



MAP OF CARBONDALE CAMPUS / 33 



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF BUILDINGS (Continued) 



R6 


Newmon Foundation (D, E-8) 


6 


R7 


Newman Foundation (Proposed) (D, E-9) 


102 


T95 


Nursery and Psychology (K-5) 


105 


1 


Old Main (F-7) 


107 


4 


Parkinson Laboratory (G-6) 


T80 


T13 


Personnel Office (F-6) 


37 


113 


Phi Sigma Kappa (M, N-4) 


T79 


T132 


Photographic Service (D-7) 


T104 


T27 


Photography Classroom (H-4) 


T121 


41 


Physical Education and Military Training Building (Proposed) (G-3) 


T36 


T76 


Physical Education (H-10) 


T75 


T58 


Physical Education Ouonset (E-7) 


T38 


22 


Physical Education Wing, University School (1-9) 


T61 


29 


Pierce Hall (J-3) 


T156 


T162 


Pine Hills Station 


SI 


5 


Placement Service (F-6) 


32 


T120 


Plan "A" House (G-4) 


11 


12 


Power Plant (E-5) 


T39 


T45 


Presidents Office (H 7) 


9 


T142 


Psychology (L-6) 


T10 


T68 


Psychology, Department of, Anne» 1 (K-6) 


T19 


T70 


Psychology, Department of, Anne* 2 (K-6) 


T15 


T71 


Psychology, Department of, Anne« 3 (1-6) 


106 


T69 


Psychology, Main Office (K-6) 


T78 


T60 


Psychology Perception Laboratory (K-7) 


T191 


10 


Pump House (F-6) 


84 


30 


Pump House No. 2 (J-3) 


T18 


T33 


Purchasing and Accounting (H-6) 


114 


T37 


Radio Studio (G-6) 


205 


T108 


Reading Center (J-7) 


T113 


Tl 


Recreation and Apartment (D-6) 


T192 


T84 


Recreation and Outdoor Education, Department of (D-8) 


T158 


T35 


Registrar (H-6) 


45 


T62 


Rehabilitation Counselor Training (K-7) 


H1-H76 


T103 


Rehabilitation Institute (K-7) 


Til 7 


T93 


Rehabilitation Institute Administrative Offices (K-7) 


23 


T90 


Rehabilitation Perception Research (L-7) 


83 


35-39 


Residence Halls (J, K-4) 


T161 


T108 


Secondary Education (J-7) 


36 


T32 


Secretary of Faculty (G-6) 


8 


T65 


Sectioning Center (H-5) 


T67 


T18 


Security Officer (G-6) 


24 


14 


Service Building No. 1 (F-4) 


T175 


15 


Service Building No. 2 (F-4) 


T72 


78 


Shelter and Boat Dock (H, 1-3) 





Shryock Auditorium (G-7) 

Sigma Kappa (M-4) 

Sigma Pi (L-3) 

Sigma Sigma Sigma (M-4) 

Small Business Institute (L-9) 

Smith Hall (K-4) 

Sociology (J-9) 

Sociology (J-9) 

Sociology (1-9) 

Southern Playhouse (H-6) 

Special Education, Department of (J-7) 

Speech, Department of and Classrooms (H-6) 

Speech and Hearing Clinic (K-7) 

Speech Correction, Department of (K-8) 

State of Illinois Public Health Laboratory (M-6) 

Steagall Hall (J-3) 

Steel Bleachers (F-5) 

Stenographic Service (H-6) 

Storage (G-7) 

Storage Building (D-6) 

Student Affoirs Office (G-6) 

Student Employment (F-6) 

Tau Kappa Epsilon (M-3) 

Technical and Adult Education, Division of (H, 1-10) 

Technology, School of (Dean) (L-7) 

Tennis Courts (F-3) 

Testing Center (G-6) 

Theta Xi (M-4) 

Trailer Court Service Building (B-6) 

Transportation Institute (D-8) 

Typography Laboratory (K-7) 

University Architect Construction Division (L-6) 

University Center (G-6) 

University Housing (F-9, F-10, G-5, G-9, J-5, J-6, K-5, K-6) 

University Press (K-7) 

University School (1-9) 

Vice President, Office of (H-7) 

Virology Research Laboratory (M-6) 

Warren Hall (K-4) 

Wheeler Hall (F-8) 

Wildlife Research Laboratory (J-6) 

Woody Hall (G-8) 

Women's Physical Education Annex (C-7) 

Zoology (1-6) 



NUMERICAL LIST OF BUILDINGS 



1 


Old Main (F-7) 


33 


2 


Altgeld Hall (G-7) 


34 


3 


Allyn Building (G-6) 


35 


4 


Parkinson Laboratory (G-6) 


36 


5 


Anthony Hall. Area Services; Community Development Institute; 


37 




Community Development Services; Extension Service; Information 


38 




Service; Placement Service 


39 


6 


Shryock Auditorium (G-7) 


41 


7 


Gymnasiu.m (F-7) 


42 


8 


Wheeler Hall (F-8) 




9 


Storage (G-7) 


44 


10 


Pump House (F-6) 


45 


11 


Steel Bleachers (F-5) 


56 


12 


Power Plant (E-5) 


57 


13 


McAndrew Stadium (F-5) 


78 


14 


Service Building No. 1 (F-4) 


79 


15 


Service Building No. 2 (F-4) 


80 


17 


Life Science Building (1-6) 


83 


18 


Animal Building (1-6) 


84 


19 


Greenhouses (1-6) 


101 


20 


Electric Sub-Stotion No. 9 (1-6) 


102 


21 


Industrial Education Wing, University School (1-8) 


103 


22 


Physical Education Wing, University School (1-9) 


104 


23 


University School (1-9) 


105 


24 


Woody Hall (G-8) 


106 


25 


Morris library (1-6) 


107 


26 


Agriculture Building (1-5) 


108-112 


27 


lentz Hall (J-4) 


113 


28 


Bailey Hall (J-4) 


114 


29 


Pierce Hall (J-3) 


115-116 


30 


Pump House No. 2 (J-3) 


117-137 


31 


Bowyer Hall (J-3) 


205 


32 


Steagall Hall (J-3) 





Brown Hall (K-3) 

Felts Hall (K-4) 

Kellogg Hall (K-4) 

Warren Hall (K-4) 

Smith Hall (K-4) 

Abbott Hall (K-4) 

Baldwin Hall (K-4) 

Physical Education and Military Training Building (Proposed) (G-3) 

Home Economics Building Group, Department of 

Anthropology (F, G-8) 

College of Education (Proposed) (J-8) 

University Center (G-6) 

Laundry (E-4) 

Applied Science Laboratory (E-4) 

Shelter and Boat Dock (H, 1-3) 

Beach House (J-2) 

Chlorination Pump House (J-2) 

Office of the Vice President (H-7) 

Tennis Courts (F-3) 

Delta Chi (M-4) 

Sigma Kappa (M-4) 

Delta Zeta (M-4) 

Alpha Gamma Delta (1-4) 

Sigma Pi (1-3) 

Tau Kappa Epsilon (M-3) 

Sigma Sigma Sigma (M-4) 

Group Housing (M-3, 4) 

Phi Sigma Kappa (M. N-4) 

Theta Xi (M-4) 

Group Housing (N-4) 

Family Housing (B, C, D-1, 2, 3) 

Trailer Court Service Building (B-6) 



34 / SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 




MAP OF CARBONDALE CAMPUS / 35 



h r 



-» I K | I I M | N 



Carbondale Campus 




36 / SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



NUMERICAL LIST OF BUILDINGS (Continued) 



H1-H76 University Housing (F-9, 10; G-5, 9; J. K-5, 6) 
H32 Mens Physical Education Research (J-6) 



Baptist Foundation (H-7) 

Baptist Foundation (J-7) 

Christian Foundation (E, F-8) 

Methodist Foundation (F-9) 

Episcopal Foundation (1-10) 

Newman Foundation (D, E-8) 

Newman Foundation (Proposed) (D, E-9) 



SI State of Illinois Public Health laboratory (M-6) 



Tl 
T2-T9 
T10 
T13 
T14 
T15 
T18 
T19 
T25 
T26 
T27 
T29 
T31 
T32 

T33 
T34 
T35 
T36 
T37 



T40 
T41 
T42 
T44 
T45 
T48 
T57 
T58 
T60 
T61 
T62 
T63 
T65 
T66 
T67 
T68 
T69 
T70 
T71 
T72 
T73 
T74 
T75 
T76 
T77 



Recreation and Apartment (D-6) 

Men's Residence Halls (C, D-6) 

Storage Building (D-6) 

Personnel Office (F-6) 

Alumni Service (F-6) 

Student Employment (F-6) 

Housing Office; Security Officer; Testing Center (G-6) 

Student Affairs Office (G-6) 

Industrial Education Shops (G-5) 

Industrial Education Offices, Classrooms, and Drafting Room (H-4) 

Industrial Education Classroom; Photography Classroom (H-4) 

Farm Ouonset Machine Shop (H-4) 

Department of Economics (G-6) 

Department of Accounting; School of Business; Secretory of 

Faculty (G-6) 
Accounting; Business Manager; Purchasing (H-6) 
Bursar (H-6) 

Auditor; Registrar (H-6) 
Southern Playhouse (H-6) 
Radio Studio (G-6) 

Department of Speech, and Classrooms (H-6) 
Central Mailing; Data Processing and Computing Center; 

Stenographic Service (H-6) 
Education Classrooms (H-5) 
Education Classrooms (H-6) 
Education Administration (H-5, 6) 
Health Service (D-6, 7) 
Presidents Office (H-7) 
Egyptian; Journalism (H-4) 
Illinois Avenue Residence Holl (F-9) 
Physical Education Quonset (E-7) 
Psychology Perception Laboratory (K-7) 
Speech and Hearing Clinic (K-7) 
Rehabilitation Counselor Training (K-7) 
AFROTC Supply (F-7) 

Advisement Center; Sectioning Center (H-5) 
Central Clinical Services (J-6) 
Wildlife Research Laboratory (J-6) 
Department of Psychology, Annex 1 (K-6) 
Department of Psychology, Main Office (K-6) 
Department of Psychology, Annex 2 (K-6) 
Department of Psychology, Annex 3 (L-6) 
Zoology (1-6) 

Industrial Psychology, Annex 4 (L-7) 
Department of Guidance (J-7) 
Department of Special Education (J-7) 
Physicol Education (H-10) 
Dean of Graduate School (H-10) 



J78 
T79 
T80 
T84 
T85 
T86 
T87 
T90 
T91 
T92 
T93 
T94 
T95 
T96 
T98 
T99 
T100 
T101 
T102 
T103 
T104 
T105 
T106 
T107 
T108 
T109 
T110-T111 
Tl 13 
T115 
Tl 16 
Tl 17 
Tl 19 
T120 
T121 
T124 
T125 
T126 
T128-T129 
T130 
T132 
T135 
T136 
T137 
T138 
T141 
T142 
T144 
T145 
T146 
T149 
T150 
T151 
T152 
T155 
T156 
T157 
T158 
T159 
T161 
T162 
T163 
T167 
T169 
T171 
T173 
T175 
T176 
T182 
T185 
T191 
T192 
T196 



Division of Technical and Adult Education (H, 1-10) 

Sociology (J-9) 

Small Business Institute (L-9) 

Department of Recreation and Outdoor Education (D-8) 

Civil Defense; Health Education and Safety (D-8) 

Central Publications (D-8) 

Area Psychological Service (C-8) 

Rehabilitation Perception Research (L-7) 

Department of English (J-9) 

Latin American Institute (D-7) 

Rehabilitation Institute Administrative Offices (K-7) 

Botany and Zoology (J-6) 

Nursery and Psychology (K-5) 

American Board Examiners, Psychology (1-7) 

Health Service (D-7) 

Central Research Shop (1-7) 

Coordinator of Research (L-8) 

Co-operative Wildlife Research (J-7) 

Department of English (G-9) 

Rehabilitation Institute (K-7) 

Sociology (J-9) 

Geography; Climatology Laboratory (J-5) 

Cartographic Office; Mississippi Valley Investigation (J-5) 

Geology (K-5) 

Reading Center; Secondary Education (J-7) 

Marketing (J-7) 

Mathematics (J-9) 

Transportation Institute (D-8) 

Film Production Units (L-7) 

Asian Studies (M-8) 

University Press (K-7) 

Geology (K-6) 

Plan "A" House (G-4) 

Sociology (1-9) 

Labor Institute (1-7) 

Design (J-5) 

Design (J, K-6) 

Design (J, K-6) 

College of Education (J, K-7) 

Photographic Service (D-7) 

Faculty Club (G-4) 

Department of English (G-9) 

Department of Government (H-10) 

Department of Health Education (L-8) 

Educational Television Research (K-7) 

Psychology (L-6) 

Department of Higher Education (H-10) 

School of Business (Dean) (1-9) 

Management (K-9) 

Design Shop A (K-6) 

Design Shop B (J-6) 

Design Shop C (J-6) 

Design Shop D (K-6) 

Dewey Editorship (M-8) 

Department of Speech Correction (K-8) 

General Improvements (B, C-7) 

University Architect Construction Division (L-6) 

Art Annex No. 1 (C-7) 

Virology Research Laboratory (M-6) 

Pine Hills Station; Economics Annex (1-6) 

Janitorial Services (K-7) 

Center for Study of Crime, Delinquency, and Corrections (K-9) 

Instructional Materials Classroom (L-7) 

Geography Annex 2 (M-7) 

Geography Annex 1 (M-7) 

Women's Physical Education Annex (C-7) 

Botany Research (L-8) 

Art Annex No. 2 (B-7) 

Journalism Annex (K-7) 

School of Technology (Dean) (L-7) 

Typography Laboratory (K-7) 

Department of English (1-9) 



5 / Schedule of Classes 



the following material may be of value in interpreting the information ap- 
pearing in the class schedule. 



LISTING OF COURSES 



General Studies Courses 
Courses which students are to take to meet the general studies requirements 
are listed in the front of the Schedule of Classes. These courses are listed by 
the area which they satisfy and within the area by course number and section 
number. 



Departmental Courses 

Departments in which courses are being offered are listed in alphabetical order. 
Courses within each department are listed in order by course number and sec- 
tion number. For a list of academic units and the departments within each, 
see page 39. 

COURSE NUMBERS AND HOURS 

The column containing this information shows the number of the course first, 
followed by the number of hours of credit. Course numbers are three digit 
numbers. In some cases the three digits may be followed by a letter which is 
also part of the course number. The number appearing after the hyphen de- 
notes the hours of credit for the course. In some cases there may be more than 
one number following the course number such as 599-2 to 5. This represents 
a variable-hour course in which the student decides the number of hours for 
which he is going to register in consultation with his adviser. 
The course numbering system is as follows: 

000-099 Course not properly falling in the following categories 

100-199 For freshmen 

200-299 For sophomores 

37 



38 / SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

300-399 For juniors and seniors 
400-499 For seniors and graduate students 
500-600 For graduate students only 



PREREQUISITE 

The prerequisite column lists requirements which must be satisfied before a 
student registers for the course. These prerequisites may be listed in various 
ways. Usually they are other courses in the same department, indicated by a 
course number. A prerequisite in another department is indicated by the depart- 
ment's code letters and the course number. 

The listing of prerequisites provides ready information for students. An ef- 
fort has been made to have the listing be complete, but this is not guaranteed. 
For the official listing of course descriptions and prerequisites, consult the bul- 
letin of the academic unit within which the department is located. 



SECTION NUMBER, TIME, AND DAYS 

The times given indicate the beginning and ending of each class period. Cen- 
tral Daylight Time is used throughout the summer session. Students registering 
for courses listed as "to be arranged" may obtain times and days from instruc- 
tor indicated or, if no instructor is listed, from the department chairman offer- 
ing the course. 

The letter T preceding a section number indicates that the section has been 
tentatively scheduled and will be opened for registration only if staff is avail- 
able. 

Those courses being offered on the quarter basis (June 17-August 31) are 
marked with a f immediately following the section number. 



BUILDING AND ROOM NUMBER 

Buildings which house summer classrooms are listed below, in alphabetical 
order according to the code used in the Schedule of Classes. The building's 
name or description follows the colon. The numbers locate the building on 
the map of the Carbondale Campus which appears in Chapter Four. The list 
below does not include temporary buildings, which are identified in the sched- 
ule by the letter T followed by a number. Such buildings are listed in numeri- 
cal order in Chapter Four. 

If a building contains more than one classroom, then the number of the 
room follows the building's code name. A building code which contains a 



SCHEDULE OF CLASSES / 39 

number is separated from the room number by the letter R. (For example, 
"T32 Rill" means room 111 in building T32.)' 



CODE: BUILDING NAME NUMBER MAP KEY 

A: Allyn Building— 3 G-6 

Ag: Agriculture Building — 26 1-4 

Alg: Altgeld Hall— 2 1-7 

ApS: Applied Science Laboratory — 57 B-7 

Aud: Shryock Auditorium — 6 H-6 

BowlingA: Bowling Alley — 46 G-6 

Browne: Browne Auditorium — 9 H-6 

Gym: Gymnasium — 7 F-7 

HEc: Home Economics Building — 42 F-8 

Lib: Morris Library — 2 5 J- 5 



CODE: BUILDING NAME — NUMBER MAP KEY 

LG: Little Grassy Lake — 

LS: Life Science Building — 17 K-4 

M: Old Main— 1 G-7 

Office: Office of the department — 

P: Parkinson Laboratory — 4 G-6 

Pool: University Swimming Pool — 22 M-6 

RadS: Radio Studios— T 37 H-6 

TVS: Television Studios— 42 F-8 

Stadium: McAndrew Stadium — 13 E-6 

USch: University School— 23 M-7 

Wh: Wheeler Hall— 8 H-7 



DEPARTMENTAL LISTING BY ACADEMIC UNIT 



ACADEMIC UNIT 


DEPARTMENT 


ACADEMIC UNIT 


DEPARTMENT 


Agriculture 


Agricultural Industries 


Home 


Clothing & Textiles 




Animal Industries 


Economics 


Food & Nutrition 




Forestry 




Home & Family 




Plant Industries 




Home Economics 
Education 


Business 


Accounting 








Economics 


Liberal Arts 


Anthropology 




Management 


& Sciences 


Botany 




Marketing 




Chemistry 




Secretarial & 




English 




Business Education 




Foreign Languages 
Geography 


Communications 


Journalism 




Geology 




Printing & Photography 




Government 




Radio-Television 




History 




Speech 




Mathematics 




Speech Correction 




Microbiology 




Theater 




Philosophy 
Physics and 


Education 


Educational Administration 




Astronomy 




& Supervision 




Physiology 




Elementary Education 




Psychology 




Guidance 




Religion 




Health Education 




Sociology 




Higher Education 




Zoology 




Instructional Materials 








Physical Educ. for Men 


Nursing 


Nursing 




Physical Educ. for Women 








Recreation & Outdoor Educ. 


Technology 


Applied Science 




Secondary Education 




Industrial Education 




Special Education 










Vocational- 


Vocational- 


Fine Arts 


Art 


Technical 


Technical 




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Institute 


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°UNDAT1C5 



Southern Illinois University Foundation 

The Southern Illinois University Foundation is a nonprofit corporation 
chartered by the state and authorized by the Board of Trustees to receive 
gifts for the benefit of the University, to buy and sell property, and otherwise 
to serve the University. 

It respectfully asks alumni and other citizens of Southern Illinois to con- 
sider making gifts and bequests to benefit the University. Such gifts should be 
conveyed to the Foundation, with proper stipulation as to their uses. The 
Foundation, through its officers and members, will be glad to confer with in- 
tending donors regarding suitable clauses to insert in wills and suitable 
forms of gifts and memorials, including bequests by means of life insurance. 
Large or small gifts to the library will be appreciated; likewise, gifts for spe- 
cial equipment, buildings, endowment of professorships in particular subjects, 
gifts to student loan funds and scholarship funds, gifts for the use of foreign 
students, and endowments for particular sorts of research. Any gifts or be- 
quests can be given suitable memorial names. 
The staff members of the Foundation are 

Mr. Kenneth R. Miller, Executive Director, Carbondale, Illinois 

Mrs. Lois H. Nelson, Secretary, Carbondale, Illinois 

Mr. Robert L. Gallegly, Treasurer, Carbondale, Illinois 

Mr. C. Eugene Peebles, Assistant Treasurer, Edwardsville, Illinois 

Mr. C. Richard Gruny, Legal Counsel, Carbondale, Illinois 

Mr. L. James Struif, Assistant Legal Counsel, Edwardsville, Illinois 

Mr. Donald Leavitt, Patent Counsel, St. Louis, Missouri 

Mr. Warren Stookey, Field Represe?itative, Edwardsville, Illinois. 



Southern Illinois University 









EDWARDSVILLE CAMPUS 1963 




.. L 'L 






IN NATURE, 
AND IN ART ; 
TEACHING HOW TO L 
I TO KEEP THE H 



IN Alt ONES OF TRUTH 
WHEREVER THEY MAY LEA 

SHOWING HOW TO THINK 
HER THAN WHAT TO 1 

ASSISTING THE POWERS 
OF THE MIND 

IN THEIR SELF-DEVELOPMENT; 



UR DEMO 
ING RESI 

FOR OUT 
EVER PEOMOTI 

wn 



THAT KNOWLEDGE MAY LEAD 
AND UNDERSTANDING 



1963 Summer Session 

Edwardsville Campus 



June 17-August 9 
June 17-August 31 




SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 
Volume 5 Number 2 February, 1963 

Second-class postage paid at Carbondale, Illinois. 
Published by Southern Illinois University, monthly 
except in September, when published semimonthly. 



The following issues of the Southern Illinois University Bulletin 

may be obtained without charge from Central Publications, 

Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois. 

General Information 

Financial Assistance 

Summer Session (Carbondale) 

Summer Session (Edwardsville) 

Schedule of Classes (Carbondale) 

Schedule of Classes (Edwardsville) 

General Announcements (Edwardsville) 

Graduate School 

College of Education 

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 

School of Agriculture 

School of Applied Science 

School of Business 
School of Communications 

School of Fine Arts 

School of Home Economics 

University Institutes 

Division of Technical and Adult Education 

All intending students should have the General Information 
bulletin (issued once a year), plus the special bulletins of the 
various educational units in which they are most interested. 



Composed and printed by Printing Service 

Southern Illinois University 

Carbondale, Illinois 



Board of Trustees 



TERM EXPIRES 

John Page Wham, Chairman, Centralia 1965 

Kenneth L. Davis, V ice-Chairman, Harrisburg 1963 

Melvin C. Lockard, Secretary, Mattoon 1965 

Martin Van Brown, Carbondale 1967 

Harold R. Fischer, Granite City 1963 

Arnold H. Maremont, Winnetka 1967 

Lindell W. Sturgis, Metropolis 1965 
Ray Page (Ex-Officio), Springfield 
Louise Morehouse, Recorder 



Officers of Instruction 



Delyte W. Morris, President 

Charles D. Tenney, Vice-President for Instruction 



EDWARDSVILLE CAMPUS 

Clarence W. Stephens, Vice-President for Operations 

William T. Going, Dean of Instruction 

John H. Schnabel, Registrar and Director of Admissions 



This Bulletin 

contains the schedule of 
summer classes to be of- 
fered by the Edwardsville 
Campus at the Alton and 
East St. Louis Centers, be- 
ginning June 17, 1963. It 
also provides the student 
with information relative 
to advisement and regis- 
tration, fees, registration 
calendar, and allied infor- 
mation. For complete in- 
formation about the Uni- 
versity the prospective stu- 
dent should refer to the 
General Information bul- 
letin. 



Table of Contents 



University Calendar, 1963-1964 vi 

Registrar's Calendar, Summer, 1963 vii 

Final Examination Schedule viii 

General Information 1 

Admission 1 

Items Applicable to the Summer Only 2 

Social Security Number 2 

Required Tests 2 

Registration 3 

Academic Load 3 

Fees 3 

Withdrawals and Program Changes 4 

Veterans' Information 5 

Student Responsibility 5 

Student Employment 6 

Workshop 6 

Schedule of Classes 7 

Listing of Courses 7 

Course Number and Hours 8 

Prerequisites 8 

Courses "To Be Arranged" 9 

Map of the Alton Center 10 

Map of the East St. Louis Center 11 

The Schedule 12 



University Calendar, 1963-1964 

Revised January 1963 

1963 SUMMER SESSION 
Session Begins Monday, June 17 

Independence Day Holiday Thursday, July 4 

Final Examinations (8-week Session) Wednesday-Thursday, August 7-8 
Summer Commencements Friday, August 9 

Final Examinations (Summer Quarter) Monday-Saturday, August 26-31 



1963 FALL QUARTER 
New Student Week Sunday-Tuesday, September 22-24 

Quarter Begins Wednesday, September 25 

Thanksgiving Vacation Wednesday, 12 noon-Monday, 8 a.m. 

November 27-December 2 
Final Examinations Wednesday-Tuesday, December 11-17 

1964 WINTER QUARTER 

Quarter Begins Thursday, January 2 

Final Examinations Wednesday-Tuesday, March 11-17 

1964 SPRING QUARTER 
Quarter Begins Wednesday, March 25 

Memorial Day Holiday Saturday, May 30 

Final Examinations Thursday- Wednesday, June 4-10 

Commencement (Edwardsville) Thursday, June 11 

Commencement (Carbondale) Friday, June 12 



Summer classes begin on Tuesday, June 18. During the fall, 
winter, and spring quarters, classes begin on the second day of 
the quarter. 



VI 



Registrar's Calendar 
Summer Session, 1963 



June 17 



June 18 
June 19 

June 28 

June 29 

July 4 
July 9 

July 16 

July 22 

August 7-8 
August 9 
August 29-30 



Central registration for classes and workshops at Alton 
and East St. Louis. Students must register for classes at 
the center they plan to attend in accordance with the al- 
phabetical registration calendar below. 



N-R 

S-T 

U-Z 

A-C 

D-G 

H-K 

L-M 

Evening students only 



8:00 a.m.- 9:00 a.m. 

9:00 a.m.-10:00 a.m. 
10:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m. 

11:00 a.m.-12:00 Noon 

1:00 p.m.- 2:00 p.m. 

2:00 p.m.- 3:00 p.m. 

3:00 p.m.- 4:00 p.m. 

4:00 p.m.- 8:00 p.m. 
Classes start 7:30 a.m. 

Program change day — Last day to add classes. 9:00 a.m- 
12:00 Noon; 1 :00 p.m.-4:30 p.m.; 6:00 p.m.-8:00 p.m. 
Last day to withdraw from school to be eligible for a re- 
fund of fees. 

Last day for refund applications to be submitted to Regis- 
trar's Office for refund of fees. 
Independence Day Holiday. 

Last day to withdraw from eight- week courses (300 level 
and above) without receiving a letter grade. 
Last day to withdraw from summer quarter courses (100 
and 200 levels) without receiving a letter grade. 
Last day for withdrawal from school except under excep- 
tional conditions. 

Final examinations for eight-week session. 
Commencement (Carbondale Campus). 
Final examinations for summer quarter. 



vn 



Final Examination Schedule 



All classes meeting for 3 hours or more of credit will schedule two-hour 
final examination periods. Classes granting less than 3 hours of credit will 
have final examinations at the last regularly scheduled class meeting. 

SUMMER SESSION, 1963 

Wednesday, August 7 

7:30 a.m. Classes that meet at 7:30 a.m. 

9:45 a.m. Classes that meet at 10:20 a.m. 

1:10 p.m. Classes that meet at 1:10 p.m. 

6:00 p.m. Classes that meet at 6:00 p.m. on Monday and Wednesday 

8:20 p.m. Classes that meet at 8:20 p.m. on Monday and Wednesday 

Thursday, August 8 

7:30 a.m. Classes that meet at 8:55 a.m. 

9:45 a.m. Classes that meet at 11:45 a.m. 

1:10 p.m. Classes that meet at 2:25 p.m. 

6:00 p.m. Classes that meet at 6:00 p.m. on Tuesday and Thursday 

8:20 p.m. Classes that meet at 8:20 p.m. on Tuesday and Thursday 

SUMMER QUARTER, 1963 
100 & 200 LEVEL COURSES 

Thursday, August 29 

7:30 a.m. Classes that meet at 7:30 a.m. 

9:45 a.m. Classes that meet at 10:20 a.m. 

1:10 p.m. Classes that meet at 1:10 p.m. 

6:00 p.m. Classes that meet at 6:00 p.m. on Monday and Wednesday 

8:20 p.m. Classes that meet at 8:20 p.m. on Monday and Wednesday 

Friday, August 30 

7:30 a.m. Classes that meet at 8:55 a.m. 

9:45 a.m. Classes that meet at 11:45 a.m. 

1:10 p.m. Classes that meet at 2:25 p.m. 

6:00 p.m. Classes that meet at 6:00 p.m. on Tuesday and Thursday 

8:20 p.m. Classes that meet at 8:20 p.m. on Tuesday and Thursday 

viii 



General Information 



The Edwardsville Campus of Southern Illinois University has scheduled 
a summer quarter, June 17 to August 31 and an eight- week summer ses- 
sion, June 17 to August 9. 

Classes on the 100 (freshman) and 200 (sophomore) levels will be 
offered in the summer quarter. Classes numbered 300 and above will be 
offered in the eight-week summer session. 

Students may enroll for classes in either the eight-week session, the 
summer quarter, or a combination or both in accordance with regular aca- 
demic load policy. 

The Edwardsville Campus offers courses leading toward associate's, 
bachelor's, and master's degrees in selected fields. 

A variety of course offerings have been scheduled to meet the specific 
needs of (1) teachers in service, (2) freshmen — beginning and refresher 
courses, (3) upperclassmen — basic requirements, (4) graduate students, 
and (5) liberal arts graduates and individuals on temporary certificates 
desiring teacher certification. 

Anyone interested in complete general information about the Univer- 
sity should obtain a copy of the General Information issue of the Southern 
Illinois University Bulletin, available free from Central Publications, South- 
ern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois. 



ADMISSION 

Application for admission to the summer session should be initiated 
with the Admissions Office on or before June 1 to permit all necessary 
processing work to be completed by the start of the session. A general ad- 
mission requirement is the filing of a transcript of record covering all pre- 
vious high school and college work. Transcripts should be mailed to the 

1 



Admissions Office from the institution (s) attended and should reach the 
Admissions Office prior to June 10, 1963. 

Complete information relative to admission of undergraduate students 
appears in the General Information issue of the Southern Illinois Univer- 
sity Bulletin. Graduate students should refer to the Graduate School issue. 

ITEMS APPLICABLE TO THE SUMMER ONLY 

An undergraduate student attending another institution who expects 
to graduate therefrom and who desires to attend Southern during the sum- 
mer only will be admitted as an unclassified student on the basis of a letter 
of good standing from the registrar of the institution the student is at- 
tending. The letter of good standing should be sent directly to the Admis- 
sions Office in Edwardsville and must be received prior to registration. 
A former student of Southern who attended the 1962 summer session and 
who was in good standing at the close of the session need not apply for 
re-entrance clearance prior to advisement and registration for the 1963 
summer session. A high school senior who ranks in the lowest third (lower 
half for out-of-state students) of his graduating class who is permitted to 
enter (on scholastic probation) for the summer quarter must register for 
more than eight hours in order to continue in attendance during the fall 
quarter and must earn a C average or above during the summer quarter. 

SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER 

Effective with the 1964 summer session, a student seeking admission 
to the University will need to present a social security number for identifi- 
cation purposes. Any local social security office can provide assistance in 
obtaining a number or replacing a lost card. At Alton the social security 
office is in the Germania Savings Building, 543 East Broadway, and at East 
St. Louis the office is at 435 Missouri Avenue. 



REQUIRED TESTS 

Each student entering Southern Illinois University directly from high 
school is required to furnish to the University scores on the test battery 
administered by the American College Testing Program (a.c.t). These 
tests are given at regional test centers throughout the United States in 
November, February, and April. Information and application blanks are 
normally available through the high school guidance director or principal, 
or may be obtained by writing directly to: American College Testing Pro- 
gram, Box 168, Iowa City, Iowa. Each applicant taking the a.c.t. tests in 
Illinois will also be required to take the Strong Vocational Interest Blank 
at the same time the former tests are given. 



A student who finds it impossible to take the a.c.t. tests may have 
scores from the College Entrance Examination Board (c.e.e.b.) submitted. 
The specific scores, which must be submitted if the c.e.e.b. tests are sub- 
mitted, are Scholastic Aptitude Test, English Composition Test, and Math- 
ematics (Intermediate) Test. In order to have identical test data, a student 
who submits c.e.e.b test data will be required to submit scores from the 
a.c.t. and the Strong Vocational Interest Blank as soon as possible, no 
later than one month after registration. 

Transfer students are required to furnish a.c.t. scores to the Student 
Counseling and Testing Center. (A transcript of these scores is available 
by sending one dollar and a written request to the American College Test- 
ing Program in Iowa City.) If the scores are on file at the student's former 
school, a request should be made for their forwarding. Test scores are not 
normally sent with a person's transcript of grades and must be requested 
separately from the appropriate office at the former school. If the a.c.t. 
tests have not been taken, arrangements to do so should be made. 



registration 

Students registering at Alton will report to the Auditorium building 
to pick up authorization-to-register permits. Students registering at East 
St. Louis will report to the west (9th Street) door of the main building 
for authorization-to-register permits. 

Students who know that they must miss more than three days of the 
summer session should not register. The brevity of this eight-week session 
makes it difficult for students missing more than three days to complete 
the required work in time. 

ACADEMIC LOAD 

The normal academic load for the eight- week session is 10 to 12 hours 
of credit. A student with special needs may, by permission of the dean of 
his academic unit, take a maximum of 14 hours. A student on probation 
may not register for more than 10 hours. A student is considered a full- 
time student during the summer session if he carries 8 or more hours. 

The normal student load for the summer quarter is 16 hours. Except 
by permission of the dean, no student may enroll for more than 18 hours 



of credit per quarter. 



FEES 



The fee schedule for an eight-week summer session and a regular 
quarter is as follows: 



REGULAR FEES EIGHT-WEEK QUARTER 

Tuition $31.50 * $42.00 * 

Student Activity Fee 7.15 9.50 

University Center Fee 5.00 5.00 

Book Rental Fee 5.00 5.00 

$48.65 $61.50 

* Out-of-state students pay an additional .... $37.50 $50.00 

A student taking six hours or fewer during the eight-week session and 
eight hours or fewer during a regular quarter pays half tuition and book 
rental fee, full university center fee, and has an option on paying the stu- 
dent activity fee. 

Other special fees or deposits as listed in the General Information bul- 
letin will be assessed when applicable. 

If a student enrolls in both eight-week and regular-quarter classes 
his tuition and fees will be assessed on the quarter basis as listed above. 

Students attending under state teacher-education, military, or general- 
assembly scholarships are required to pay the university center fee and the 
book rental fee. Veterans attending under Public Laws 16 and 894 are not 
required to pay any of the regular fees. Students attending under Public 
Law 550 are required to pay fees, both regular and special, and may not 
use military scholarships for waiving payment of any fees. 

WITHDRAWALS AND PROGRAM CHANGES 

A prescribed procedure must be followed by any student desiring to 
change his academic program or to withdraw from the University while 
the period for which he is registered is still in progress. 

WITHDRAWALS 

A student is considered officially registered after he has cleared his 
payment of fees at the Business Office. If a student then finds he cannot 
attend college or, if after attending for a period of time finds he cannot 
continue, he must report to the Registrar's Office to indicate official with- 
drawal action. 

Failure to follow the official procedure will result in academic penalty. 

PROGRAM CHANGES 

A student is officially registered only for those courses appearing on 
his registration cards. Any change to add or drop a course can be made 
only after fees are paid and must be made through an official program 
change. A student may not drop a course merely by stopping attendance. 
Mere attendance does not constitute registration in a class, nor will attend- 



ance in a class for which a student is not registered be a basis for asking 
that a program change be approved permitting registration in that class. 

If a student desires to drop a course during the second or third week 
of the summer, the change will be approved only when the reasons appear 
valid. If a student desires to drop a course after the third week the change 
will be approved only under unusual conditions. During the last three 
weeks of the session, changes will be approved only in extreme emergencies. 

A student desiring to make a program change must initiate his re- 
quest at the Enrollment Center of the Registrar's Office. He is required to 
present his fee receipt program card and must complete the following pro- 
cedure. After having been cleared with the Enrollment Center, program 
changes for which a program change fee is assessed must be presented 
to the Business Office for payment. The student immediately returns the 
program change to the Enrollment Center in the Registrar's Office for final 
processing. A student has not completed his program change until he pre- 
sents it to the Enrollment Center. No change is official until the preceding 
procedure is complete. 

A program change must be made in order to drop a course. A student 
may not drop merely by stopping attendance. The last day for dropping a 
course without receiving a grade is July 9. 

Program changes will be accepted at the Registrar's Office from 9:00 
a.m. to 12:00 Noon, 1:00 to 4:30 p.m., and 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. on Program 
Change Day, June 19. After June 19 only program changes for withdraw- 
ing from a class will be accepted. 

VETERANS' INFORMATION 

The Edwardsville Campus is approved for veterans. Veterans eligible 
for benefits under the G.I. Bill should contact the University veterans' 
adviser during registration periods. Public Law 550 expires in 1965. War 
orphans should discuss Public Law 634 benefits with the veterans' adviser. 

To be eligible for Public Law 550 benefits, the veteran must be fully 
admitted and enrolled as a regular classified student making satisfactory 
progress in a degree program. 

veterans' sign-up period 

Veterans eligible for benefits will sign a monthly attendance certifica- 
tion on the following dates at the Registrar's Office in Alton or East St. 
Louis. 

Period Date Time 

June 17 to June 30 June 28 9:00 A.M.-12 Noon, 1-4:30 p.m. 

July 1 to July 31 July 31 9:00 A.M.-12 Noon, 1-4:30 p.m. 

August 1 to August 9 August 9 9:00 A.M.-12 Noon, 1-4:30 p.m. 

August 1 to August 30 August 30 9:00 A.M.-12 Noon, 1-4:30 p.m. 



Checks for the summer session should not be expected before Septem- 
ber 20. Veterans who fail to sign on the specified date will probably ex- 
perience delay in receiving the check for that period. 

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY 

Each student must assume responsibility for his progress by keeping 
an up-to-date record of the courses he has taken and by checking period- 
ically with his adviser and the Registrar's Office. Responsibility for errors 
in program or in interpretation of regulations of the University rests en- 
tirely with the student. 



STUDENT EMPLOYMENT 

Students interested in part-time employment on campus during the 
summer should make early application to the office of Student Employ- 
ment, Southern Illinois University, Alton, Illinois, or East St. Louis, Illinois. 



WORKSHOP 

Workshop in Intergroup Relations (Sociology 388-3) first two weeks 
of the summer session, Monday through Friday, 1:00-6:00. The course 
offers theoretical and practical understanding of cultural, social, and psy- 
chological factors associated with intergroup tensions. Students concentrate 
their efforts on problem-solving activities related to their occupational, 
professional, or civic interests. Resource and consultative staff from the 
academic areas of education, psychology, sociology, and social work will 
be utilized. The course should be particularly valuable for the staffs of 
health and welfare agencies and for community leaders. 



Schedule of Classes 



the following material may be of value in interpreting the information 
appearing in the schedule. 



LISTING of courses 

Courses are listed numerically within each subject-matter area. Areas 
in which courses are listed for the 1963 summer session appear below in 
the order of their appearance in the schedule. 

SUBJECT AREA DIVISION 

General Studies (GSA), (GSB), (GSC), (GSD), (GSE) 

Accounting (ACCT) Business 

Anthropology (ANTH) Social Sciences 

Art (ART) Fine Arts 

Chemistry (CHEM) Science and Technology 

Comparative Literature (C LT) Humanities 

Economics (ECON) Business 

Education Education 

Administration (ED AD) Education 

Elementary (ED EL). Education 

Secondary (ED SEC) Education 

Special (ED SP) Education 

English (ENG) Humanities 

Foreign Languages (FL) Humanities 

French (FR) Humanities 

German (GER) Humanities 

Geography (GEOG). Social Sciences 

Government (GOV) Social Sciences 

Guidance (GUID) Education 

Health Education (H ED) Education 

History (HIST) Social Sciences 



Instructional Materials (I M) Education 

Management (MGT) Business 

Marketing (MKTG) Business 

Mathematics (MATH) Science and Technology 

Music (MUS) Fine Arts 

Physical Education — Men (PEM) Education 

Physical Education — Women (PEW) Education 

Physics (PHYS) Science and Technology 

Physiology (PHSL) Science and Technology 

Psychology (PSYC) Education 

Radio-Television (R-T) Fine Arts 

Secretarial Science (SEC SCI) Business 

Sociology (SOC) Social Sciences 

Zoology (ZOOL) Science and Technology 



COURSE NUMBER AND HOURS 

The column containing this information shows the number of the 
course first, followed by the number of hours of credit. Course numbers 
are three digit numbers. In some cases the three digits may be followed by 
a letter which is also part of the course number. The number appearing 
after the hyphen denotes the hours of credit for the course. In some cases 
there may be more than one number following the course number such 
as 599-2 to 5. This represents a variable-hour course in which the student, 
in consultation with his adviser, decides the number of hours for which he 
is going to register. 

The course numbering system is as follows: 

000-099 Courses not properly falling in the following categories 

100-199 For freshmen 

200-299 For sophomores 

300-399 For juniors and seniors 

400-499 For seniors and graduate students 

500-600 For graduate students only 



PREREQUISITES 

For the guidance of students many courses list prerequisites needed be- 
fore the course under question can be taken. These prerequisites may be 
listed in a number of different ways. If only a number appears, it refers 
to a course in the same subject area. If the course is in another area, that 
area will be listed prior to the number. On advanced levels, registration 
for a course may require the consent of the instructor. 

8 



COURSES "TO BE ARRANGED" 

Students registering for courses listed as "to be arranged" should con- 
sult the instructor indicated or the head of the division if no instructor is 
listed, to determine time and place of meeting. 



ALTON CENTER 



MLZUne 




4073 Student Union (SU) 

Student Affairs 

Student Employment and 
Placement 

Health Service 
4079 Science (SCI) 
4081 Gymnasium (GYM) 

5070 Storage 

5071 Registrar's Office and 

Business Office 

5072 Book Store 

5077 Library 

5078 Fine Arts A (FAA) 
5080 Auditorium (AUD) 

6065 Graduate Advisement Office 
6074 Fine Arts C (FAG) 



6075 Education 

6076 Language Laboratory (LL) 

6082 Annex B (ANB) 

6083 Annex A (ANA) 

6084 Fine Arts B (FAB) 

6085 Humanities (HUM) 

6086 Administration 

General Office 
Division Heads' Office 

6087 Classrooms (HH) 

6088 Social Sciences (SS) 

6089 Business Faculty Offices 
6092 Brick Yard Building (BY) 

Madison County Mental 
Health Clinic 



10 



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Building 9096 
Building 9098 



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ALUNOfS^ 

ZZ p-TLTLl 'Z- 




^UNDATIC? 



Southern Illinois University Foundation 

The Southern Illinois University Foundation is a nonprofit corporation 
chartered by the state and authorized by the Board of Trustees to receive 
gifts for the benefit of the University, to buy and sell property, and otherwise 
to serve the University. 

It respectfully asks alumni and other citizens of Southern Illinois to con- 
sider making gifts and bequests to benefit the University. Such gifts should be 
conveyed to the Foundation, with proper stipulation as to their uses. The 
Foundation, through its officers and members, will be glad to confer with in- 
tending donors regarding suitable clauses to insert in wills and suitable 
forms of gifts and memorials, including bequests by means of life insurance. 
Large or small gifts to the library will be appreciated; likewise, gifts for spe- 
cial equipment, buildings, endowment of professorships in particular subjects, 
gifts to student loan funds and scholarship funds, gifts for the use of foreign 
students, and endowments for particular sorts of research. Any gifts or be- 
quests can be given suitable memorial names. 
The staff members of the Foundation are 

Mr. Kenneth R. Miller, Executive Director, Carbondale, Illinois 

Mrs. Lois H. Nelson, Secretary, Carbondale, Illinois 

Mr. Robert L. Gallegly, Treasurer, Carbondale, Illinois 

Mr. C. Eugene Peebles, Assistant Treasurer, Edwardsville, Illinois 

Mr. C. Richard Gruny, Legal Counsel, Carbondale, Illinois 

Mr. L. James Struif, Assistant Legal Counsel, Edwardsville, Illinois 

Mr. Donald Leavitt, Patent Counsel, St. Louis, Missouri 

Mr. Warren Stookey, Field Representative, Edwardsville, Illinois. 







Southern Illinois University 




t 







SJUAjU ^ GUiia 



DWARDSVILLE CAMPUS 1963 





f-M 



.- - 
■ ^ 



rs f™*TTLJE 



bk 



TO ANDING 

TO WISDOM. 



Schedule of Classes 

Fall Quarter, 1963 
Edwardsville Campus 




SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 
Volume 5 Number 3 March, 1963 

Second-class postage paid at Carbondale, Illinois. 
Published by Southern Illinois University, monthly 
except in September, when published semimonthly. 



The following issues of the Southern Illinois University Bulletin 

may be obtained without charge from Central Publications, 

Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois 

General Information 

Financial Assistance 

Summer Session (Carbondale) 

Summer Session (Edwardsville) 

Schedule of Classes (Carbondale) 

Schedule of Classes (Edwardsville) 

General Announcements (Edwardsville) 

Graduate School 

College of Education 

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 

School of Agriculture 

School of Applied Science 

School of Business 
School of Communications 

School of Fine Arts 
School of Home Economics 
University Institutes 
Division of Technical and Adult Education 

All intending students should have the General Information 
bulletin (issued once a year), plus the special bulletins of the 
various educational units in which they are most interested. 



Composed and printed by Pantagraph Press 
Bloomington, Illinois 



Board of Trustees 



TERM EXPIRES 

John Page Wham, Chairman, Centralia 1965 

Kenneth L. Davis, V ice-Chairman, Harrisburg 1963 

Melvin C. Lockard, Secretary, Mattoon 1965 

Martin Van Brown, Carbondale 1967 

Harold R. Fischer, Granite City 1963 

Arnold H. Maremont, Winnetka 1967 

Lindell W. Sturgis, Metropolis 1965 
Ray Page (Ex-officio), Springfield 
Louise Morehouse, Recorder 



Officers of Instruction 



Delyte W. Morris, President 

Charles D. Tenney, Vice-President for Instruction 



EDWARDSVILLE CAMPUS 

Clarence W. Stephens, Vice-President for Operations 

William T. Going, Dean of Instruction 

John H. Schnabel, Registrar and Director of Admissions 

Business Division, John J. Glynn, Head 

Education Division, Cameron W. Meredith, Head 

Fine Arts Division, Andrew J. Kochman, Head 

Humanities Division, Nicholas T. Joost, Head 

Science and Technology Division, Kermit G. Clemans, Head 

Social Sciences Division, Herbert H. Rosenthal, Head 



This Bulletin 

contains the schedule of 
classes to be offered on 
the Edwardsville Campus 
for the fall quarter of the 
1963-64 school year. It 
also provides information 
relative to advisement and 
registration. It does not 
cover all questions con- 
cerning Southern Illinois 
University. For additional 
information about the 
Edwardsville Campus 
the prospective student 
should refer to the Gen- 
eral Information bulletin 
and General Announce- 
ments (Edwardsville). 



Table of Contents 



Registration Calendar, Fall Quarter, 1963 vi 

University Calendar, 1963-1964 viii 

Calendar of Events, 1963-1964 ix 

Final Examination Schedule, Fall Quarter, 1963 xi 

General Information 1 

Admission 1 

Required Tests 1 

Advisement 2 

Change of Field of Concentration 3 

Registration 3 

Social Security Identification Number 3 

Fees 4 

Auditing of Courses 4 

Program Changes 5 

Withdrawal from School 5 

Cancellation of Registration 6 

Academic Load 6 

Personal Data Changes 6 

Veterans' Information 7 

Sign-Up Periods 8 

Schedule of Classes 9 

Listing of Courses 9 

Course Number and Hours 9 

Prerequisites 10 

Section Number, Time, and Days 10 

Free Bus Transportation 10 

Academic Units 11 

Maps of Alton Center and East St. Louis Center 12 

The Schedule 14 



Registration Calendar 
Fall Quarter, 1963 



May 20-24 
May 27-31 

July 1-12 

July 16 
July 18 

July 16-August 2 

August 2 

August 13- 
September 6 

September 6 

September 17 

September 22-24 



Advance registration: Juniors and seniors enrolled in 
the 1963 spring quarter may register 9:00 to 11:30 
a.m., 1:30 to 4:00 p.m. Evening and graduate students 
may register 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. 
Advance registration: Freshmen and sophomores en- 
rolled in the 1963 spring quarter may register 9:00 to 
11:30 a.m., 1:30 to 4:00 p.m. Evening and graduate 
students may register 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. 
Re-entering students may advance register at both 
centers, Alton and East St. Louis, 1:00 to 4:00 p.m. 
daily, Monday through Friday. 

Advisement Day for all new students, Alton Center, 
4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m., Alton Auditorium. 
Advisement Day for all new students, East St. Louis 
Center, 4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m., East St. Louis Audi- 
torium. 

Advance registration period for new students who 
have cleared their admission status, 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 
Noon, 1:00 to 4:00 p.m. 

Students will receive fee statements by mail if regis- 
tered by this date. 

Advance registration period for new students who 
have cleared their admission status, 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 
Noon, 1:00 to 4:00 p.m. Students must pay fees at time 
of registration if registering between these dates. 
Students will have their advance registrations can- 
celled if fees are not paid at the Bursar's Office by 
4:00 p.m., c.d.t., on this date. 

Program change day for students advance registered, 
9:00 a.m. to 12:00 Noon, 1:30 to 4:30 p.m., 5:00 p.m. 
to 7:00 p.m. 
New Student Orientation 



vi 



September 25 Fall Quarter begins. General registration for new and 

re-entering students. Students must register for classes 
at the center they plan to attend in accordance with 
the alphabetical registration calendar. Students regis- 
tering at Alton will report to the auditorium building 
to pick up authorization-to-register permits. Students 
registering at East St. Louis will report to the west 
( 9th street ) door of the main building for the authori- 
zation-to-register permits. 





CLASS 






HOURS 


COMPLETED 




Freshrm 


in 




47 or J 


fewer 




Sophomore 




48 to 95 




Junior 






96 to 143 




Senior 






144 or more 




Graduate 




Degree completed 




Unclassified 




Nondegree seeking 


FRESHMEN 


SOPHOMORES 


JUNIORS, SENIORS 


AC 


8:00- 8:30 


A-C 


1:00-1:15 


A-C 


2:45-3:00 


D-G 


8:30- 9:00 


D-G 


1:15-1:30 


D-G 


3:00-3:15 


H-K 


9:00- 9:30 


H-K 


1:30-1:45 


H-K 


3:15-3:30 


L-M 


9:30-10:00 


L-M 


1:45-2:00 


L-M 


3:30-3:45 


N-R 


10:00-10:30 


N-R 


2:00-2:15 


N-R 


3:45-4:00 


S-T 


10:30-11:00 


S-T 


2:15-2:30 


S-T 


4:00-4:15 


U-Z 


11:00-11:30 


U-Z 


2:30-2:45 


U-Z 


4:15-4:30 



5:00-8:00 Graduate students, unclassified students, 
and students taking evening and Saturday 
only classes register at this time. 

September 26 Classes begin 8:00 a.m. 

September 27 Program Change Day: 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 Noon, 1:00 

p.m. to 4:00 p.m., 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. All program 

changes must be completed this day. Only class drops 

will be accepted after this date. 
October 7 Last day to withdraw from school to be eligible for 

a refund of fees. 
October 9 Last day for refund applications to be submitted to 

the Registrar's Office for refund of fees. 
October 22 Last day to withdraw from a course without receiving 

a letter grade. 
December 4 Last day to drop a class or withdraw from school 

except under exceptional conditions. 

vii 



University Calendar, 1963-1964 

Revised January 1963 

1963 SUMMER SESSION 

Session Begins Monday, June 17 

Independence Day Holiday Thursday, July 4 

Final Examinations (8-week Session) Wednesday-Thursday, August 7-8 
Summer Commencements Friday, August 9 

Final Examinations (Summer Quarter) Monday-Saturday, August 26-31 



1963 FALL QUARTER 

New Student Week Sunday-Tuesday, September 22-24 

Quarter Begins Wednesday, September 25 

Thanksgiving Vacation Wednesday, 12 Noon-Monday, 8 a.m. 

November 27-Deeember 2 
Final Examinations Wednesday-Tuesday, December 11-17 



1964 WINTER QUARTER 

Quarter Begins Thursday, January 2 

Final Examinations Wednesday-Tuesday, March 11-17 



1964 SPRING QUARTER 

Quarter Begins Wednesday, March 25 

Memorial Day Holiday Saturday, May 30 

Final Examinations Thursday-Wednesday, June 4-10 

Commencement ( Edwardsville ) Thursday, June 11 

Commencement (Carbondale) Friday, June 12 



Summer classes begin on Tuesday, June 18. During the fall, 
winter, and spring quarters, classes begin on the second day 
of the quarter. 

viii 



Calendar of Events, 1963-1964 



22 Saturday 



15 Monday 



5 Monday 



22-25 Sunday- 
Wednesday 

27-28 Friday- 
Saturday 



19 Saturday 
21 Monday 



1 Friday 

4 Monday 

9 Saturday 

■6 Saturday 

'2 Friday 



7 Saturday 
9 Thursday 



JUNE 

American College Test, 8:00 a.m., Alton Student 
Union Building, East St. Louis Student Affairs Office 

JULY 

AUGUST 
National Defense Loan applications due 

SEPTEMBER 
New Student Week Activities 

Edwardsville Campus Student Council Retreat 

OCTOBER 
Student Leadership Training 

Southern Illinois University Scholarship and Activity 
Award applications for Winter Quarter due 

NOVEMBER 

National Defense Loan applications due 

uZnT-u° lleg ^ TeSt> 8:00 A - M -> AIto « Student 
Union Building, East St. Louis Student Affairs Office 

8 30 d nt After" EXaminati ° n ( ° bjeCtive Test ) 

St&TSS Examination (Essay Test > 6:0 ° 

DECEMBER 

S^n AdmiSSi ° n Examination ( Es ^7 Test) 8:30 
New Student Orientation 



Calendar of Events, 1963-1964 (Continued) 

JANUARY 1964 

24 Friday Graduate Admission Examination (Objective Test) 

6:00 p.m., Alton 
30 Thursday Southern Illinois University Scholarship and Activity 

Award applications due 

FEBRUARY 

13 Thursday National Defense Loan applications due 

14 Friday Graduate Admission Examination (Essay Test) 6:06 

p.m., Alton 

15 Saturday American College Test, 8:00 a.m., Alton Student 

Union Building, East St. Louis Student Affairs Office 

MARCH 
20 Friday New Student Orientation 

APRIL 

11 Saturday Graduate Admission Examination (Objective Test) 

8:30 a.m., East St. Louis 
22 Wednesday Southern Illinois University Scholarship and Activity 

Award applications for Summer Quarter, 1964, due 

25 Saturday American College Test, 8:00 a.m., Alton Student 

Union Building, East St. Louis Student Affairs Office 



2 Saturday 

4 Monday 

6 Wednesday 

19 Friday 

20 Saturday 

10 Friday 



MAY 

Graduate Admission Examination (Essay Test) 8:30 

a.m., East St. Louis 

Southern Illinois University Scholarship and Activity 

Award applications for 1964-65 due 

National Defense Loan applications for Summer 

Quarter, 1964, due 

JUNE 

Graduate Admission Examination (Objective Test) 
6:00 p.m., Alton 

American College Test, 8:00 a.m., Alton Student 
Union Building, East St. Louis Student Affairs Office 

JULY 

Graduate Admission Examination (Essay Test) 6:00 
p.m., Alton 



Final Examination Schedule 
Fall Quarter, 1963 



Wednesday, December 11 

7:50 a.m. Classes that meet at 8:00 a.m. 
10:10 a.m. GSD English Composition 151 — All day sections 
12:50 p.m. Classes that meet at 1:00 p.m. 

3:10 p.m. GSA 251 All day sections 

6:30 p.m. Classes that meet before 8:00 p.m. on Monday and 
Wednesday and Wednesday ONLY classes 

Thursday, December 12 

7:50 a.m. Classes that meet at 9:00 a.m. 
10:10 a.m. GSD 155 All day sections 
12:50 p.m. Classes that meet at 2:00 p.m. 

3:10 p.m. GSA 151 All day sections 

6:30 p.m. Classes that meet before 8:00 p.m. on Tuesday and 
Thursday and Thursday ONLY classes 

Friday, December 13 

7:50 a.m. Classes that meet at 10:00 a.m. 
10:10 a.m. GSB 151, 152, 153 All day sections 
12:50 p.m. Classes that meet at 3:00 p.m. 

3:10 p.m. GSB 251 All day sections 

6:30 p.m. Classes that meet after 8:00 p.m. on Tuesday and Thurs- 
day and Friday ONLY classes 

Saturday, December 14 

9:00 a.m. Classes that meet ONLY on Saturday 

Monday, December 16 

7:50 a.m. Classes that meet at 11:00 a.m. 
10:10 a.m. GSD 153 All day sections 

xi 



12:50 p.m. Classes that meet at 12:00 Noon 

4:00 p.m. Classes that meet at 4:00 p.m. 

Classes that meet at 4:20 p.m. on Monday and Wednesday 

6:30 p.m. Classes that meet after 8:00 p.m. on Monday and Wednes- 
day and Monday ONLY classes 

Tuesday, December 17 

7:50 a.m. 

10:10 a.m. Make-up period for day examinations 

12:50 p.m. 

4:00 p.m. Classes that meet at 4:20 p.m. on Tuesday and Thursday 
6:30 p.m. Classes that meet Tuesday ONLY and make-up period 
for evening examinations 

NOTE: Final examinations for one and two credit hour courses will be 
held during the last regularly scheduled class period prior to 
December 11, 1963. 

All classes meeting for 3 hours or more of credit will schedule 
two hour final examination periods. 



xu 



General Information 



This bulletin contains the schedule of classes to be offered at the 
Alton and East St. Louis centers of the Edwardsville Campus for the 
fall quarter of the 1963-64 school year. It also provides the student with 
information relative to advisement and registration, fees, various calen- 
dars of events, and allied information. 

Classes offered during the winter, spring, and summer on the 
Edwardsville Campus will continue to appear in separate bulletins. Class 
schedule information for the University's Carbondale Campus may be 
secured from Central Publications, Southern Illinois University, Carbon- 
dale, Illinois. 



ADMISSION 

A student must be officially admitted to the University before regis- 
tration in classes will be permitted. Students who have not completed the 
admission requirements by the start of the registration period will not 
be permitted to register. The student, to be permitted to attend classes 
at Southern Illinois University, must have completed registration, which 
includes admission, advisement, sectioning, and payment of fees. 

Admission policies for undergraduate students are stated in the 
General Information issue of the Southern Illinois University Bulletin. 
Admission policies for graduate students appear in the Graduate School 
issue. Either issue may be obtained from Central Publications. 

Inquiries concerning admission to Southern Illinois University 
should be directed to the Admissions Office at Edwardsville. Applica- 
tions for admission are accepted any time during the calendar year but 
should be initiated by September 1, 1963, for the fall quarter. 

REQUIRED TESTS 

All entering freshmen must take the American College Testing Pro- 
gram prior to advisement and registration. Illinois residents who ranked 

1 



in the lowest third of their graduating class must take the test battery 
before they can be considered for admission. Out-of-state students who 
rank in the lower one-half of their graduating classes must take the tests 
prior to admission. High school students are encouraged to take the 
American College Testing Program during the spring of their senior 
year and thus be ready for academic advisement during the summer. A 
complete set of dates and test centers is available from the Registrar's 
Office. Students who are not able to take the tests in the spring may 
make arrangements to be tested on one of the dates listed below. 

TESTING DATE DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF REGISTRATION FORM 

April 20, 1963 March 30, 1963 

June 22, 1963 June 1, 1963 

November 9, 1963 October 12, 1963 

February 15, 1964 January 18, 1964 

April 25, 1964 April 4, 1964 

June 20, 1964 May 31, 1964 

Transfer students are expected to take the tests unless they have 
their scores forwarded from their former school. These scores are not 
normally sent with one's transcript and should be requested from the 
appropriate office of the former school before the registration period. 



ADVISEMENT 

After a student has been admitted to the University, he should talk 
with an adviser about his educational plans and complete his registra- 
tion for the quarter he expects to enter Southern. 

To insure that an undergraduate student is properly advised con- 
cerning the choice of a course of study which will fulfill the require- 
ments of the University and prepare him for his chosen career, academic 
advisement has been made the special responsibility of a selected group 
from the teaching faculty. During his first two years he will receive 
prime advice from a chief academic adviser for his campus and, if he 
has selected a field of concentration, secondary advice from a repre- 
sentative of that field. Later, after formally declaring his field of con- 
centration, he will receive prime advice from a representative of that 
field. 

Each student must assume responsibility for his progress by keeping 
an up-to-date record of the courses he has taken and by checking peri- 
odically with his adviser and the Registrar's Office. Responsibility for 

2 



errors in program or in interpretation of regulations of the University 
rests entirely with the student. 

CHANGE OF FIELD OF CONCENTRATION 

Every student currently registered in the University will be con- 
tinued in his present curriculum unless he initiates a change in his field 
of concentration. He initiates such a change with his adviser, and the 
registrar's copy of the change form should accompany the student's reg- 
istration. No change of concentration made after a registration has been 
processed will be reflected in the student's record until the next registra- 
tion. 

REGISTRATION 

At Southern, a program of advance registration is in operation. The 
period of time from the third through the tenth week of each quarter 
and from the third through the seventh week of the eight-week summer 
session is used for advisement and registration for the following quarter. 
For example, a student who plans to attend during the winter quarter 
may register between the third and tenth week, inclusive, of the fall 
quarter. All students are urged to take advantage of the advance regis- 
tration period. A one day general registration is also held the first day 
of each quarter for new and re-entering students. 

Registration for any session of the University is contingent upon 
being eligible for registration. Thus, a registration including the pay- 
ment of tuition and fees may be considered invalid if the student is 
declared to be ineligible to register due to scholastic reasons. The same 
situation may exist due to financial or disciplinary reasons if certified 
to the registrar by the director of the Student Affairs Office. 

SOCIAL SECURITY IDENTIFICATION NUMBER 

The University will require students to present social security num- 
bers for student identification in the fall of 1964. Students should be 
prepared to present their social security card bearing the identification 
number at the time of registration for the fall quarter, 1963. Persons who 
do not have social security numbers should apply to their local social 
security offices or to the Social Security Office in the Germania Savings 
Building, 543 East Broadway, Alton, Illinois, or 435 Missouri Avenue, 
East St. Louis, Illinois 

FEES 

A student who advance registers will receive his fee statement and 
receipt card by mail and his fees may be paid either by mail or in person 

3 



by the deadline date specified in the Registration Calendar. Upon pay- 
ment of fees, the fee statement and receipt card will be stamped by the 
bursar and returned to the student. This card which serves as the official 
authorization to attend classes as scheduled must be presented to obtain 
textbooks and activity cards and to process program changes. It should 
be carried at all times. If fees are paid in person, the card will be given 
to the student at the time of payment. If paid by mail, the card may be 
picked up at any time thereafter at the Bursar's Office. 

A student who does not advance register must pay his fees at the 
time he registers. 

Illinois students taking more than 8 hours will pay the following 
regular fees: 

Tuition $42.00 

Book rental 5.00 

Activity fee 9.50 

Student union building fund 5.00 

Total $61.50 

Illinois students taking 8 or fewer hours will pay the following fees: 

Tuition $21.00 

Book rental , . . . 2.50 

Student union building fund 5.00 

Total $28.50 

The activity fee of $9.50 is optional for part-time students. Once an 
option has been made by a student at the time of registration as to 
whether or not to pay the activity fee, such option is irrevocable. 

Out-of-state students will pay an additional $50 if they take more 
than 8 hours, or an additional $25 if they take 8 hours or fewer. 

In addition to the above, there are some physical education classes 
that require a special fee. 

Students having special fee status, such as scholarship holders, fac- 
ulty, and staff, will pay their respective fees according to the particular 
status. 

The University reserves the right to change fees and have the 
change go into effect whenever the proper authorities so determine. 

AUDITING OF COURSES 

A student may register for courses in an "audit" status. He receives 
no letter grade and no credit for such courses. An auditor's registration 

4 



card must be marked accordingly. He pays the same fees as though he 
were registering for credit. He is expected to attend regularly and is to 
determine from the instructor the amount of work expected of him. If 
an auditing student does not attend regularly, the instructor may deter- 
mine that the student should not have the audited course placed on his 
record card maintained in the Registrar's Office. A student registering 
for a course for credit may not later change to an audit status or vice 
versa except for fully justified reasons. Such a change will ordinarly re- 
quire the academic dean's approval. 

PROGRAM CHANGES 

Mere attendance does not constitute registration in a class, nor will 
attendance in a class for which a student is not registered be a basis 
for asking that a program change be approved permitting registration 
in that class. A student is officially registered for only those courses ap- 
pearing on his registration cards. Any change therefrom can be made 
only after fees are paid and must be made through an official program 
change. A student is considered officially registered after he has cleared 
his payment of fees at the Bursar's Office. 

A program change must be made in order to drop or add a course. 
A student may not drop a course merely by stopping attendance. If a 
student desires to drop a course during the second, third, or fourth week 
of a quarter, the change will be approved only when the reasons appear 
valid. If a student desires to drop a course after the fourth week, the 
change will be approved only under unusual conditions. In the last three 
weeks changes will be approved only in extreme emergencies. 

A student desiring to make a program change must initiate his re- 
quest at the Enrollment Center of the Registrar's Office. He is required 
to present his fee receipt program card and must complete the following 
procedure. After having been cleared with the Enrollment Center, pro- 
gram changes for which a program change fee is assessed must be pre- 
sented to the Business Office for payment. The student immediately re- 
turns the program change to the Enrollment Center in the Registrar's 
Office for final processing. A student has not completed his program 
change until he presents it to the Enrollment Center in the Registrars 
Office. No change is official until the preceding procedure is complete. 

A program change day is listed in the registration calendar. 

WITHDRAWAL FROM SCHOOL 

A student who finds it necessary to withdraw from school while 
the quarter is in progress must report to the Enrollment Center in the 

5 



Registrar's Office to initiate official withdrawal action. No withdrawal 
will be permitted during the last two weeks of a quarter except under 
exceptional conditions. A refunding of fees is permitted only if a with- 
drawal is officially completed within the first two weeks of a quarter 
and if the application for a refund is received in the Registrar's Office 
within two weeks following the last regular registration period. See the 
registration calendar for the specific dates concerning withdrawal and 
refunding of fees. 

CANCELLATION OF REGISTRATION 

A registration including the payment of tuition and fees may be 
considered invalid if the student is declared to be ineligible to register 
due to scholastic reasons. The same situation may exist due to financial 
or disciplinary reasons if certified to the registrar by the director of the 
Student Affairs Office. 



ACADEMIC LOAD 

The normal class load is 16 quarter hours for undergraduate stu- 
dents and 12 quarter hours for graduate students. The maximum load 
for both is 18 hours. A student with a 4.25 average or above for the pre- 
ceding quarter may be allowed by the chief academic adviser of the 
center or by the head of his division to take as many as 21 hours. In no 
case may a student carry or be credited with more than 21 hours in any 
quarter. A student on probation may not take more than 14 hours. 

A person may not register for more than 8 hours if he is employed 
full time. 

The Selective Service System requires a minimum of 12 hours to 
qualify for a student deferment. 

The National Defense Education Act requires a minimum of 12 
hours to qualify for a student loan. 



PERSONAL DATA CHANGES 

1. A CHANGE IN ADDRESS, whether local, home, or parents', 
is to be reported by the student to the Registrar's Office as soon as pos- 
sible after the change occurs. The above addresses for a student are ob- 
tained from his Number 7 registration card when he first registers for a 
quarter during the year. Address changes are not made thereafter during 
the year unless they are reported by the student. 

6 



2. A CHANGE IN NAME is to be reported to the Enrollment 
Center in the Registrar's Office. A change for marital reasons will be 
made on the basis of a signed statement. Other changes may require 
the presenting of legal evidence. 

3. A CHANGE IN MARITAL STATUS is to be reported to the 
Registrar's Office. A change will be made if it is based upon incorrect 
coding or punching. Any other change must be accompanied by a signed 
statement. 

4. A CHANGE IN LEGAL RESIDENCE (whether an Illinois or 
out-of-state resident) is to be requested on the Application to be De- 
clared an Illinois Resident form in the Registrar's Office. Before the 
request is honored, the registrar must be satisfied that the student has 
met the regulations governing residency status as established by the 
Board of Trustees. 



VETERANS' INFORMATION 

The Edwards ville Campus is approved for veterans. Veterans eli- 
gible to receive benefits under the GI bill should contact the University 
veterans' adviser during registration periods. Public Law 550 expires in 
1965. War orphans should discuss Public Law 634 benefits with the 
veterans' adviser. 

Veterans enrolled under Public Law 550 and war orphans under 
Public Law 634 are subject to the following regulations regarding aca- 
demic load required for proportional subsistence for the regular quarter. 

Number of Hours Required 
Type of Enrollment 

Full-time enrollment 
%-time enrollment 
%-time enrollment 
Less than ^-time enrollment 

To be eligible for the benefits of Public Law 550 or Public Law 634, 
the student must be fully admitted and enrolled as a regular classified 
student making satisfactory progress in a degree program. 

Veterans attending under one of the public laws should note that 
the Registrar's Office will certify enrollment and attendance to the Vet- 
eran's Administration for subsistence purposes only as of the date when 
fees were cleared at the Bursar's Office. 



Undergraduate 


Graduate 


Quarter 8-Week 


Quarter 8-Week 


14 10 


10 7 


10-13 7-9 


8-9 6 


7-9 5-6 


5-7 4-5 


6 or less 4 or less 


4 or less 3 or less 



SIGN-UP PERIODS 

Veterans and war orphans eligible for benefits will sign a monthly 
attendance certification on the last Thursday of each month starting 
October 31, 1963, at the Registrar's Office in Alton or East St. Louis. 

Veterans who fail to sign on the specified date will probably experi- 
ence delay in receiving the check for that period. 



Schedule of Classes 



The following material may be of value in interpreting the informa- 
tion appearing in the class schedule. 

The University reserves the right to change or cancel any class. 



LISTING OF COURSES 

Courses are listed numerically within each subject-matter area. 
Areas in which courses are offered for the 1963 fall quarter are listed 
on page 11 in the order of their appearance in the schedule. Beside each 
area is its code (in parentheses) used for registration purposes. A single 
letter following the area's code letters indicates one of the six divisions: 
B indicates the Business Division, E the Education Division, F the Fine 
Arts Division, H the Humanities Division, T the Science and Technology 
Division, and S the Social Sciences Division. 



COURSE NUMBER AND HOURS 

The column containing this information shows the number of the 
course first, followed by the number of hours of credit. Course numbers 
are three-digit numbers. In some cases the three digits may be followed 
by a letter which is also part of the course number. The number appear- 
ing after the hyphen denotes the hours of credit for the course. In some 
cases there may be more than one number following the course number 
such as 599-2 to 5. This represents a variable-hour course in which the 
student decides the number of hours for which he is going to register 
in consultation with his adviser. 



The course numbering system is as follows: 

000-099 Course not properly falling in the following categories 

100-199 For freshmen 

200-299 For sophomores 

300-399 For juniors and seniors 

400-499 For seniors and graduate students 

500-600 For graduate students only 



PREREQUISITES 

For the guidance of students many courses list the courses which 
need to have been taken before the one under question can be taken. 
These prerequisites may be listed in a number of different ways. If only 
a number appears, it refers to a course in the same subject area. If the 
course is in another subject area, that area will be listed prior to the 
number. On advanced course levels, registration in a course may require 
the consent of the instructor. 



SECTION NUMBER, TIME, AND DAYS 

Section numbers for classes at Alton are between 1 and 49. Those 
for classes at E. St. Louis are between 51 and 99. 

A letter prefixed to a section number has one of the following inter- 
pretations: E means beginning at 5:30 p.m. or later, B means scheduled 
for inter-campus bus transportation, and S means meeting on Saturdays. 

Students registering for courses listed as "to be arranged" should 
consult with the division head to determine time and place of meeting. 



FREE BUS TRANSPORTATION 

To provide students with a broader program, certain upper division 
classes have been scheduled around a bus transportation schedule. Free 
bus service will be provided between Alton and East St. Louis on Mon- 
days, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays at times given below. 

Classes scheduled for inter-campus bus transportation meet twice 
weekly for periods of one and one-half or two hours. 

The bus will depart from East St. Louis on the Ohio Street side 
and from Alton on College and Seminary Streets. 

Students taking courses on the bus schedule will not need to travel 

10 



during the week of final examinations to take their tests. The examina- 
tion will be proctored at the other center by the chief academic adviser 
or a member of his staff. 

Likewise, students will not need to travel to return their textbooks. 
The bookstore at either center will accept texts for courses on the bus 
schedule provided that the student makes clear this situation to the 
attendant at the time of book return; otherwise record confusion will 
result. 



DEPART 
EAST ST. LOUIS 

8:00 a.m. 
10:00 a.m. 
12:00 Noon 

2:00 p.m. 

4:00 p.m. 



ARRIVE 
ALTON 

8:50 A.M. 
10:50 A.M. 

12:50 P.M. 
2:50 p.m. 
4:50 p.m. 



ACADEMIC UNITS 



EAST ST. LOUIS 


9:50 


A.M. 


11:50 


A.M. 


1:50 


P.M. 


3:50 


P.M. 


AREA 


DIVI- 


CODE 


SION 



SUBJECT AREA 



AREA 
CODE 



DIVI- 
SION 



General Studies Area A . . (GSA) 

General Studies Area B . . (GSB) 

General Studies Area C . . (GSC) 

General Studies Area D . . (GSD) 

General Studies Area E . . (GSE) 

Accounting (Acct) B 

Applied Science (Ap Sci) T 

Art (Art) F 

Botany (Bot) T 

Chemistry (Chem) T 

Comparative Literature . . (C Lt) H 

Economics (Econ) B 

Education E 

Administration (Ed Ad) E 

Elementary (Ed El) E 



DEPART 
ALTON 

9:00 A.M. 

11:00 a.m. 
1:00 p.m. 
3:00 p.m. 



SUBJECT AREA 

Government (Gov) S 

Guidance (Guid) E 

Health Education (H Ed) E 

History (Hist) S 

Humanities (Hum) H 

Instructional Materials . . (I M) E 

,.H 
..B 
..B 
..T 
..F 
.H 



Journalism (Jrnl) . . 

Management (Mgt) . 

Marketing (Mktg) 

Mathematics (Math) 

Music (Mus) . 

Philosophy ...(Phil). 

Physical Education — 

Men (PEM) 

Physical Education — 

Women (PEW) 

Physics (Phys) . 



Secondary (Ed Sec) . 

Special (EdSp). 

English (Eng) . . . 

Foreign Languages (F L) . . . 

French (Fr) 

German (Ger) 

Russian (Russ) . . . 

Spanish (Span) . . 

Geography (Geog) . . 



..E 
..T 

Physiology (Phsl) T 

Psychology (Psyc) E 

Radio and Television (R-T) F 

Secretarial and 

Business Education (Sec) B 

Sociology (Soc) S 

Speech (Spch) F 

Speech Correction (Sp C) F 

Theater (Thea) F 

Zoology (Zool) T 



11 



EAST ST. LOUIS CENTER 



L 



Summit Avenue 



Summit Avenue 

















B7099W 




Ohio Street 



Ohio Street 



LEGEND: 



Building 7099: 
Building 9090: 
Building 9096: 
Building 9098: 

12 



Main Building 
Faculty Offices 
Faculty Offices 
Faculty Offices 




ALTON CENTER 



6074 



jL 



COLLEGE AVE. 
16082 TENNIS 
COURTS 
16083 




6075 



6065 



LEVERETT AVE. 



EDWARDS ST. 



4073 Student Union (SU) 

Student Affairs 

Student Employment and 
Placement 

Health Service 
4079 Science (SCI) 
4081 Gymnasium (GYM) 

5070 Storage 

5071 Registrar's Office and 

Business Office 

5072 Book Store 

5077 Library 

5078 Fine Arts A (FAA) 
5080 Auditorium (AUD) 

6065 Graduate Advisement Office 
6074 Fine Arts G (FAG) 



ir 



6075 Education 

6076 Language Laboratory (LL) 

6082 Annex B (ANB) 

6083 Annex A (ANA) 

6084 Fine Arts B (FAB) 

6085 Humanities (HUM) 

6086 Administration 

General Office 
Division Heads* Office 

6087 Classrooms (HH) 

6088 Social Sciences (SS) 

6089 Business Faculty Offices 
6092 Brick Yard Building (BY) 

Madison County Mental 
Health Clinic 

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XLLINOIS^ 




°UNDATIC^ 



Southern Illinois University Foundation 

The Southern Illinois University Foundation is a nonprofit corporation 
chartered by the state and authorized by the Board of Trustees to receive 
gifts for the benefit of the University, to buy and sell property, and otherwise 
to serve the University. 

It respectfully asks alumni and other citizens of Southern Illinois to con- 
sider making gifts and bequests to benefit the University. Such gifts should be 
conveyed to the Foundation, with proper stipulation as to their uses. The 
Foundation, through its officers and members, will be glad to confer with in- 
tending donors regarding suitable clauses to insert in wills and suitable 
forms of gifts and memorials, including bequests by means of life insurance. 
Large or small gifts to the library will be appreciated; likewise, gifts for spe- 
cial equipment, buildings, endowment of professorships in particular subjects, 
gifts to student loan funds and scholarship funds, gifts for the use of foreign 
students, and endowments for particular sorts of research. Any gifts or be- 
quests can be given suitable memorial names. 
The staff members of the Foundation are 

Mr. Kenneth R. Miller, Executive Director, Carbondale, Illinois 

Mrs. Lois H. Nelson, Secretary, Carbondale, Illinois 

Mr. Robert L. Gallegly, Treasurer, Carbondale, Illinois 

Mr. C. Eugene Peebles, Assistant Treasurer, Edwardsville, Illinois 

Mr. C. Richard Gruny, Legal Counsel, Carbondale, Illinois 

Mr. L. James Struif, Assistant Legal Counsel, Edwardsville, Illinois 

Mr. Donald Leavitt, Patent Counsel, St. Louis, Missouri 

Mr. Warren Stookey, Field Representative, Edwardsville, Illinois. 



BUS SCHEDULE 

depart arrive depart arrwe 

east st. louis alton alton east st. louis 

8:00 a.m. 8:50 a.m. 9:00 a.m. 9:50 a.m. 

10:00 a.m. 10:50 a.m. 11:00 a.m. 11:50 a.m. 

12:00 m. 12:50 p.m. 1:00 p.m. 1:50 p.m. 

2:00 p.m. 2:50 p.m. 3:00 p.m. 3:50 p.m. 

4:00 p.m. 4:50 p.m. 



Southern Illinois University 





4 * 

;.-v ; :■■■:;■;■■ '. ' ■ 



lllli 




t>dUAJut o£ Ql*nei 




C ARBONDALE CAMPUS 1963 



I \J l'v ;-.'■■.. c 






Schedule of Classes 

Fall Quarter, 1963 
Carbondale Campus 




SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 
Volume 5 Number 4 April 1, 1963 

Second-class postage paid at Carbondale, Illinois. 
Published by Southern Illinois University, monthly 
except semimonthly in April, June, and September. 



The following issues of the Southern Illinois University Bulletin 

may be obtained without charge from Central Publications, 

Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois. 

General Information 

Financial Assistance 

Summer Session (Carbondale) 

Summer Session (Edwardsville) 

Schedule of Classes (Carbondale) 

Schedule of Classes (Edwardsville) 

General Announcements (Edwardsville) 

Graduate School 

College of Education 

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 

School of Agriculture 

School of Applied Science 

School of Business 
School of Communications 

School of Fine Arts 

School of Home Economics 

University Institutes 

Division of Technical and Adult Education 

All intending students should have the General Information 
bulletin (issued once a year), plus the special bulletins of the 
various educational units in which they are most interested. 



Composed and printed by Printing Service 

Southern Illinois University 

Carbondale, Illinois 






Board of Trustees 



TERM EXPIRES 

John Page Wham, Chairman, Centralia 1965 

Kenneth L. Davis, Vice -Chairman, Harrisburg 1963 

Melvin C. Lockard, Secretary, Mattoon 1965 

Martin Van Brown, Carbondale 1967 

Harold R. Fischer, Granite City 1963 

Arnold H. Maremont, Winnetka 1967 

Lindell W. Sturgis, Metropolis 1965 
Ray Page (Ex-Officio), Springfield 
Louise Morehouse, Recorder 



Officers of Instruction 



Delyte W. Morris, President 

Charles D. Tenney, Vice-President for Instruction 

CARBONDALE CAMPUS 
John E. Grinnell, Vice-President for Operations 
William J. McKeefery, Dean of Academic Affairs 
Robert A. McGrath, Registrar and Director of Admissions 

The Graduate School, Willis G. Swartz, Dean 

College of Education, Arthur E. Lean, Dean 

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Henry Dan Piper, Dean 

School of Agriculture, Wendell E. Keepper, Dean 

School of Business, H. J. Rehn, Dean 

School of Comunications, C. Horton Talley, Dean 

School of Fine Arts, Burnett Shryock, Dean 

School of Home Economics, Eileen E. Quigley, Dean 

School of Technology, Julian H. Lauchner, Dean 

Division of University Extension, Raymond H. Dey, Dean 

Division of Technical and Adult Education, Ernest J. Simon, Dean 



This Bulletin 



contains the schedule of 
Carbondale Campus class- 
es offered at Carbondale, 
at Southern Acres, and at 
the Little Grassy Lake 
camp during the fall quar- 
ter, 1963. It also provides 
information relative to ad- 
visement and registration. 
It does not cover all ques- 
tions concerning Southern 
Illinois University. For 
complete information 
about the University the 
prospective student should 
refer to the General Infor- 
mation bulletin. 



Table of Contents 



University Calendar, 1963-1964 vi 

Registration Calendar, Fall, 1963 vii 

Calendar of Events, Fall, 1963 viii 

General Information 1 

Advisement and Registration System 1 

Advisement and Registration Procedure 2 

Payment of Fees 3 

Fees for a Regular Quarter 3 

Registering for only Night and/or Saturday Classes 4 

Late Registration 4 

Auditing of Courses 5 

Registering for and Withdrawing from Courses 5 

Withdrawal from School 6 

Cancellation of Registration 7 

Personal Data Changes 7 

Map of the Carbondale Campus 8 

Alphabetical List of Buildings 8 

Numerical List of Buildings 9 

Map 10 

Schedule of Classes 13 

Listing of Courses 13 

General Studies Courses 13 

Departmental Courses 13 

Course Numbers and Hours 13 

Prerequisites 14 

Section Number, Time, and Days 14 

Building and Room Number 14 

Freshman Convocations 15 

The Schedule 16 

General Studies Courses 16 

Departmental Listing by Academic Unit 51 

Departmental Courses 52 

Vocational-Technical Institute Courses 128 

v 



University Calendar, 1963-1964 

Revised January 1963 

1963 SUMMER SESSION 
Session Begins Monday, June 17 

Independence Day Holiday Thursday, July 4 

Final Examinations (8-week Session) Wednesday-Thursday, August 7-8 
Summer Commencements Friday, August 9 

Final Examinations (Summer Quarter) Monday-Saturday, August 26-31 



New Student Week 
Quarter Begins 
Thanksgiving Vacation 

Final Examinations 



1963 FALL QUARTER 

Sunday-Tuesday, September 22-24 

Wednesday, September 25 

Wednesday, 12 noon-Monday, 8 a.m. 

November 27-December 2 

Wednesday-Tuesday, December 11-17 



Quarter Begins 
Final Examinations 



1964 WINTER QUARTER 

Thursday, January 2 
Wednesday-Tuesday, March 11-17 



1964 SPRING QUARTER 



Quarter Begins 
Memorial Day Holiday 
Final Examinations 
Commencement (Edwardsville) 
Commencement (Carbondale) 



Wednesday, March 25 

Saturday, May 30 

Thursday- Wednesday, June 4-10 

Thursday, June 11 

Friday, June 12 



Summer classes begin on Tuesday, June 18. During the fall, 
winter, and spring quarters, day classes begin on the second day 
of the quarter. Evening classes (5:45 p.m. or later) on the Car- 
bondale Campus begin on the first day of the quarter. 



Registration Calendar, Fall 1963 



April 10-May 31 
April 16-17 

July 1-August 2 

August 12-23 
August 23 
September 13 

September 22-24 

September 25 



September 26 
October 8 



October 8 
October 9 
October 22 
December 3 



Advance registration period only for students enrolled 
in the 1963 spring quarter. 

Advance registration for night and Saturday classes for 
off-campus students and for vocational rehabilitation 
students (5:00-7:00 p.m.). 

Advance registration period for students enrolled in the 
1963 summer session and for new and re-entry students 
who have cleared their admission status. 
Advanced registration period for new and re-entry stu- 
dents. 

Students will receive fee statements by mail if regis- 
tered by this date. 

Students will have their advance registrations cancelled 
if fees are not paid at the Bursar's Office by 4:00 p.m., 
c.d.t., on this date, unless they have received approval 
for deferred payment. 

New Student Week. New students (undergraduates 
and graduate) who did not advance register may do so. 
All other students must wait until Wednesday, Septem- 
ber 25. 

Fall Quarter begins. 

Last day of regular registration period. Night classes 
(5:45 p.m. or later) begin. Fall extension classes begin. 
Day classes begin. Late registration period begins. 
Last registration day without dean's written approval. 
Last day to withdraw from school to be eligible for a 
refund of fees. 

Deadline for payment of fees by students whose fees 
were deferred. 

Last day for refund applications to be submitted to 
Registrar's Office for refund of fees. 
Last day to withdraw from a course without receiving 
a letter grade. 

Last day for making a program change or withdrawing 
from school except under exceptional conditions. 



VI i 



Calendar of Events, Fall, 1963 

this calendar contains all the dates and events within the official 
University Calendar. It also lists certain test dates and a few other all- 
university events which are related to the academic program. 

SEPTEMBER 

21 Saturday. American College Testing Program (Make-up session for 
late applicants, fall quarter), 8:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m. 

21 Saturday. Lado English Examination (for new foreign students), 
2:00-4:30 p.m. 

22 Sunday. New Student Week begins. 

24 Tuesday. New Student Week ends. 

25 Wednesday. Fall Quarter begins. 

OCTOBER 

19 Saturday. Graduate English and Scholastic Aptitude Tests (English 
speaking students), 1:00-4:00 p.m., Furr Auditorium. 

19 Saturday. Graduate English Test (non-English speaking students), 
1:00-4:00 p.m., Studio Theater, University School. 

19 Saturday. Medical College Admission Test, 8:30 a.m.-1:00 p.m., Mor- 
ris Library Auditorium. 

31 Thursday. Undergraduate English Qualifying Examination, 9:00 a.m- 
12:00 noon, Muckelroy Auditorium. 

NOVEMBER 

1 Friday. Registration closes for Graduate Record Examination (Na- 
tional Program) to be given on November 16. 

2 Saturday. Graduate English Theme Test, 1:00-3:00 p.m., Browne 
Auditorium. 

2 Saturday. Ph.D. in Education Selection Test Battery, 8:00 a.m.-3:00 
p.m., Muckelroy Auditorium. 

16 Saturday. Graduate Record Examination (National Program), 8:00 
a.m.- 5:00 p.m., Morris Library Auditorium. 

27 Wednesday. Thanksgiving Recess begins, 12:00 noon. 

DECEMBER 

2 Monday. Thanksgiving Recess ends, 8:00 a.m. 
1 1 Wednesday. Fall Quarter final examinations begin. 

17 Tuesday. Fall Quarter final examinations end. 

viii 



General Information 



this bulletin contains the schedule of classes for the Carbondale Campus, 
fall quarter, 1963. It also provides the student with information relative to 
advisement and registration, fees, various calendars of events, and allied 
information for the Carbondale Campus. 

The schedule of classes for the Edwardsville Campus may be secured 
from Central Publications, 113 East Grand, Carbondale, or from the Gen- 
eral Offices at the Alton Center or the East St. Louis Center. 



ADVISEMENT AND REGISTRATION SYSTEM 

The Carbondale Campus uses an academic advisement system whereby 
each undergraduate academic unit has a chief academic adviser and a 
number of assistant advisers selected from the teaching faculty. After a 
student has received his Certificate of Admission, his next step is to contact 
the Academic Advisement Center for an appointment with an academic 
adviser of the academic unit which he is entering. Graduate students should 
contact the Graduate School. 

After advisement the student may register for classes. The new student 
should also familiarize himself with the registration system used on the 
Carbondale Campus. For a number of years, an advance registration sys- 
tem has been used through which a student is expected to register for a 
quarter before the quarter starts. The registration calendar appears on 
page vii. 

During the registration process the student goes through the Sectioning 
Center where the assignment is made to specific sections of the courses the 
student is to take. For a number of years the Carbondale Campus has had 
to schedule classes at night and on Saturday mornings because of space 
limitations. A student is to expect assignment to night or Saturday morn- 
ing classes even though it is recognized that these may be considered un- 
desirable class hours. 

1 



ADVISEMENT AND REGISTRATION 
PROCEDURE 

NEW STUDENTS 

Students entering the University for the first time with the 1963 fall 
quarter are permitted to advance register only after they have been admit- 
ted to the University as evidenced by their receiving the Certificate of Ad- 
mission from the Admissions Office. In addition, new freshmen are required 
to have completed the necessary tests. 

Undergraduate students initiate the advance registration process by 
contacting the Academic Advisement Center, building T65, for an appoint- 
ment with an adviser. Graduate students contact the Graduate School, 309 
West Mill Street. Specific advisement and registration information is sent 
to each student when he is admitted. 

The Academic Advisement Center will be open July 1-August 2 and 
August 12-23, Monday through Friday, 8:00 to 12:00 and 1:00 to 3:30, 
c.d.t. The Sectioning Center will be open on the same days, 8:00 to 11:30 
and 1:00 to 4:30, c.d.t. They will also be open on Saturdays from 8:30 
to 11:30 during these periods, but the number of students who can be 
handled is restricted. Students must write at least ten days in advance for 
appointments for advisement. 

New students who cannot take advantage of the advance registration 
process should refer to the Registration Calendar on page vn to find out 
when they may register at the beginning of the fall quarter. 

RE-ENTERING STUDENTS 

Students who have attended the University at some former time but 
not during the session immediately prior to the time they plan to re-enter 
should initiate action by contacting the Admissions Office. Specific advise- 
ment and registration information will be furnished as they complete their 
re-entrance procedure with the Admissions Office. 

CURRENT STUDENTS, CARBONDALE CAMPUS 

All students currently registered in the University will be continued in 
their present curriculum unless a change of college or major is made. A 
change of college or major is initiated with the student's adviser. Either 
change should be made at the time of advisement, and the registrar's copy 
of the change form should accompany the student's registration. Changes 



of college or major made after a registration has been processed will not 
be reflected in the student's records until the next registration. 

An undergraduate student currently registered in the University will 
schedule an appointment with his adviser. At the time of advisement he 
will secure his authorization card and other registration cards. These are 
to be processed through the Sectioning Center as soon as possible after ad- 
visement. 

A graduate student currently registered in the University will report 
to the Graduate School, 309 West Mill Street, to initiate the registration 
process. After the registration forms have been approved by the dean of the 
Graduate School, they will be brought to the Sectioning Center, T65. 

CURRENT STUDENTS, EDWARDSVILLE CAMPUS 

A student attending the Edwardsville Campus who plans to attend 
the Carbondale Campus during the 1963 fall quarter must initiate his 
registration process by contacting the Admissions Office. At that time, 
he will need to have either an official transcript of his Southern record or 
a letter of good standing from the registrar at the Edwardsville Campus. 



PAYMENT OF FEES 

A student who advance registers will receive his fee statement and re- 
ceipt card by mail, and his fees may be paid either by mail or in person 
by the deadline date specified in the Registration Calendar. Upon payment 
of fees, the fee statement and receipt card will be stamped by the bursar 
and returned to the student as a fee receipt together with the No. 3 pro- 
gram card. These cards should be carried at all times. They serve as official 
authorization to attend classes as scheduled and must be presented to ob- 
tain books and activity cards and to process program changes. If fees are 
paid in person, these cards will be given to the student at the time of pay- 
ment. If paid by mail, they may be picked up at any time thereafter at 
the Bursar's Office. 

A student who does not advance register must pay his fees at the time 
he registers. 

EEES FOR A REGULAR QUARTER 

Illinois students taking more than 8 hours will pay the following reg- 
ular fees: 

Tuition $42.00 

Book rental 5.00 



Activity fee 9.50 

Student union building fund fee 5.00 

Total $61.50 

Illinois students taking eight or fewer hours will pay half tuition and 
book rental, will have an option of paying the activity fee, and will pay 
the full student union building fund fee. Once an option has been made by 
a student at the time of registration as to whether or not to pay the activi- 
ty fee, such option is irrevocable. A part-time student, then, will pay either 
$28.50 or $38.00. 

Out-of-state students will pay an additional tuition of $50.00 if 
taking more than eight hours and an additional $25.00 if taking eight 
hours or fewer. 

In addition to the above, students registering for the first time during 
the year for AF ROTC will be subject to a $5.00 equipment deposit. 

Students having special fee status, such as scholarship holders, faculty, 
and staff, will pay fees according to their particular status. 

The University reserves the right to change fees and have the change 
go into effect whenever the proper authorities so determine. 



REGISTERING FOR ONLY 

NIGHT AND/OR SATURDAY CLASSES 

Students registering for only night and/or Saturday classes may ad- 
vance register, during regular office hours, the same as other students. 
Registration offices are also open on two nights, between 5 and 7 p.m., dur- 
ing each advance registration period for the convenience of these students. 
(Refer to Registration Calendar). In addition, registration offices are open 
on the first night of each quarter from 6 to 8 p.m. and on the first Satur- 
day of each quarter from 8:30 a.m. to 12 noon for registering these stu- 
dents. 



LATE REGISTRATION 

The first day of a quarter is considered the last day of the regular reg- 
istration period. Registrations thereafter, including those involving "to be 
arranged," are considered late registrations and are assessed the appropriate 
late registration fee. This is $2.00 the first day with an additional $1.00 per 
day to a maximum of $5.00. The only exception to this late fee rule is 
for students taking only night and/or Saturday classes. These students 
may register on the first Saturday without a late fee. Thereafter, these stu- 



dents pay a straight $5.00 late registration fee. Registration is permitted 
during the first two weeks of a quarter. Registration thereafter will be per- 
mitted only with the written approval of the student's academic dean and 
will apply only to those students who, for valid reasons could not arrive 
on campus during the first two weeks. Any student who was on campus 
during the first two weeks of a quarter and who attempts to complete his 
registration (clearing his fees at the Bursar's Office) thereafter will not be 
permitted to do so. 

Veterans attending under one of the public laws should note that the 
Registrar's Office will certify enrollment and attendance to the Veteran's 
Administration, for subsistence purposes, only as of the date when fees 
were cleared at the Bursar's Office, should registration take place after the 
opening date of the quarter. 

Students registering only for a course(s) whose meeting time is listed 
as "to be arranged" in the Schedule of Classes must be registered by the 
first day of a quarter or be assessed late registration fees the same as regular 
students. 



AUDITING OF COURSES 

A student may register for courses in an "audit" status. He receives no 
letter grade and no credit for such courses. An auditor's registration card 
must be marked accordingly. He pays the same fees as though he were 
registering for credit. He is expected to attend regularly and is to determine 
from the instructor the amount of work expected of him. If an auditing 
student does not attend regularly, the instructor may determine that the 
student should not have the audited course placed on his record card main- 
tained in the Registrar's Office. A student registering for a course for credit 
may not later change to an audit status or vice versa except for fully 
justified reasons. Such a change will ordinarily require the student's 
academic dean's approval. 



REGISTERING FOR AND WITHDRAWING 
FROM COURSES 

Mere attendance does not constitute registration in a class nor will 
attendance in a class for which a student is not registered be a basis for 
asking that a program change be approved permitting registration in that 
class. 

A student is officially registered only for those courses appearing on 
his registration cards. Any change therefrom can be made only after fees 



are paid and must be made through an official program change, which in- 
cludes the following steps: 

Step 1. Initiating the change. 

A graduate student changing courses initiates the change by pre- 
senting his fee receipt and No. 3 program card to his graduate 
adviser. He then must secure the approval of the Graduate School. 
An undergraduate student changing courses initiates the change 
by presenting his fee receipt and No. 3 program card to his aca- 
demic adviser at the Academic Advisement Center. 
A student changing sections hut not courses initiates the change 
by taking his fee receipt and No. 3 program card to the Section- 
ing Center. 
Step 2. Sectioning. 

The student must take his program change form to the Section- 
ing Center within two days after approval by his adviser. 
Step 3. Paying the program change fee. 

If a program change fee has been assessed, then the program 
change form must be presented to the Bursar's Office for payment. 
(Otherwise, this step is omitted.) 
Step 4. Final Processing. 

The student completes his program change by presenting it to the 
Enrollment Center in the Registrar's Office. 
All program changes made by graduate students (except section 
changes) require Graduate School approval. Undergraduate student pro- 
gram changes (except for section changes and dropping of courses) made 
after the second week of a quarter require the approval of the student's aca- 
demic dean or his designated representative. 

A program change must be made in order to drop a course. A student 
may not drop merely by stopping attendance. The last date for dropping 
a course without receiving a W-grade is the last day of the fourth week 
of a quarter. (Refer to Registration Calendar.) 

Program changes will not be accepted at the Sectioning Center on the 
first day of a quarter. 



WITHDRAWAL FROM SCHOOL 

A student who finds it necessary to withdraw from school while the 
quarter is in progress must report to the Student Affairs Office to initiate 
official withdrawal action. No withdrawal will be permitted during the last 
two weeks of a quarter except under exceptional conditions. A refunding 
of fees is permitted only if a withdrawal is officially completed within the 



first two weeks of a quarter and if the application for a refund is received 
in the Registrar's Office within two weeks following the last regular regis- 
tration period. See the Registration Calendars in this bulletin for the spe- 
cific dates concerning withdrawal and refunding of fees. 

A student who advance registers, including paying of fees, and then 
finds that he cannot attend school must also officially withdraw from 
school. He may do this by writing the Student Affairs Office and asking 
them to initiate official withdrawal action for him. This must be done by 
the end of the first two weeks if the student expects to get a refund. 



CANCELLATION OF REGISTRATION 

An advance registration including the payment of tuition and fees may 
be considered invalid if the student is declared to be ineligible to register 
due to scholastic reasons. The same situation may exist due to financial 
or disciplinary reasons if certified to the Registrar by the Director of Stu- 
dent Affairs. 



PERSONAL DATA CHANGES 

1. A CHANGE IN ADDRESS, whether local, home, or parents', is 
to be reported by the student to the reception desk in the Registrar's 
Office as soon as possible after the change occurs. The above ad- 
dresses for a student are obtained from his Number 4 registration 
card when he first registers for a quarter during the year. Address 
changes are not made thereafter during the year unless they are 
reported as above by the student. 

2. A CHANGE IN NAME is to be reported to the Enrollment Center 
in the Registrar's Office. A change for marital reasons will be done 
on the basis of a signed statement. Other changes may require the 
presenting of legal evidence. 

3. A CHANGE IN MARITAL STATUS is to be reported to the En- 
rollment Center. A change will be made if it is based upon incor- 
rect coding or punching. Any other change must be accompanied 
by a signed statement. 

4. A CHANGE IN LEGAL RESIDENCE (whether an Illinois or 
out-of-state resident) is to be requested on the Application to be 
Declared an Illinois Resident form in the Registrar's Office. Be- 
fore the request is honored, the Registrar must be satisfied that the 
student has met the regulations governing residency status as estab- 
lished by the Board of Trustees. 



Carbondale Campus Map 

this map has been prepared primarily to help students find classrooms, 
offices, and housing. 



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF BUILDINGS 



38 


Abbott Hall (K-4) 


T141 


T32 


Accounting, Department of (G-6) 


T40 


T78 


Adult Education (H, 1-10) 


T41 


T65 


Advisement Center (H-5) 


44 


T63 


AFROTC Supply (F-7) 


20 


26 


Agriculture Building (1-5) 


T91 


3 


Allyn Building (G-6) 


T102 


104 


Alpha Gamma Delta (L-4) 


T136 


2 


Altgeld Hall (G-7) 


T196 


114 


Alumni Service (F-6) 


R5 


T96 


American Board Examiners, Psychology (1-7) 


5 


18 


Animal Building (1-6) 


T135 


5 


Anthony Hall (F-6) 


117-137 


42 


Anthropology, Department of (F, G-8) 


T29 


57 


Applied Science Laboratory (E-4) 


34 


T87 


Area Psychological Service (C-8) 


Tl 15 


5 


Area Services (F-6) 


T157 


T159 


Art Annex No. 1 (C-7) 


T173 


T182 


Art Annex No. 2 (B-7) 


T171 


T116 


Asian Studies (M-8) 


T105 


T35 


Auditor (H-6) 


T107 


28 


Bailey Hall (J-4) 


T119 


39 


Baldwin Hall (K-4) 


T137 


Rl 


Baptist Foundation (H-7) 


T77 


R2 


Baptist Foundation (J-7) 


19 


79 


Beach House (J-2) 


101-116 


T94 


Botany and Zoology (J-6) 


T74 


T176 


Botany Research (18) 


7 


31 


Bowyer Hall (J-3) 


T85 


33 


Brown Hall (K-3) 


T138 


T34 


Bursar (H-6) 


T44 


T33 


Business Manager (H-6) 


T98 


T32 


Business, School of (G-6) 


T144 


T145 


Business, School of (Dean) (1-9) 


42 


T106 


Cartographic Office (J-5) 


T18 


T167 


Center for Study of Crime, Delinquency, and Corrections (K-9) 


T57 


T66 


Central Clinical Services (J-6) 


T27 


T39 


Central Mailing (H-6) 


T26 


T86 


Central Publications (D-8) 


T25 


T99 


Central Research Shop (L-7) 


21 


80 


Chlorination Pump House (J-2) 


T73 


R3 


Christian Foundation (E, F-8) 


5 


T85 


Civil Defense (D-8) 


T169 


T105 


Climatology Laboratory (J-5) 


T163 


5 


Community Development Institute (F-6) 


T48 


5 


Community Development Services (F-6) 


T185 


T101 


Cooperative Wildlife Research (J-7) 


35 


T100 


Coordinator of Research (L-8) 


T124 


T39 


Data Processing and Computing Center (H-6) 


T92 


101 


Delta Chi (M-4) 


56 


103 


Delta Zela (M-4) 


27 


T125 


Design (J-5) 


17 


T126 


Design (J, K-6) 


13 


T128 


Design (J-6) 


T29 


T129 


Design (K-6) 


T146 


T149 


Design Shop A (K-6) 


TI09 


T150 


Design Shop B (J-6) 


T110 


T151 


Design Shop C (J-6) 


Till 


T152 


Design Shop D (K-6) 


H32 


T155 


Dewey Editorship (M-8) 


T2-T9 


T162 


Economics Annex (1-6) 


R4 


T31 


Economics, Department of (G-6) 


T106 


T42 


Education Administration (H-5, 6) 


25 



Educational Television Research (K-7) 

Education Classrooms (H-5, 6) 

Education Classrooms (H-5, 6) 

Education, College of (Proposed) (J-8) 

Electric Sub-station No. 9 (1-6) 

English, Department of (J-9) 

English, Department of (G-9) 

English, Department of (G-9) 

English, Department of (1-9) 

Episcopal Foundation (1-10) 

Extension Service (F-6) 

Faculty Club (G-4) 

Family Housing (B, C, D-l, 2, 3) 

Farm Quonset Machine Shop (H-4) 

Felts Hall (K-4) 

Film Production Units (L-7) 

General Improvements (B, C-7) 

Geography Annex 1 (M-7) 

Geography Annex 2 (M-7) 

Geography; Climatology Laboratory (J-5) 

Geology (K-5) 

Geology (K-6) 

Government, Department of (H-10) 

Graduate S iooI, Dean of (H-10) 

Greenhouses (1-6) 

Group Housing (L, M, N-3, 4) 

Guidance, Department of (J-7) 

Gymnasium (F-7) 

Health Education and Safely (D-8) 

Health Education, Department of (L-8) 

Health Service (D-6. 7) 

Health Service (D-7) 

Higher Education, Department of (H-10) 

Home Economics Building Group (F, G-8) 

Housing Office (G-6) 

Illinois Avenue Residence Hall (F-9) 

Industrial Education, Classroom (H-4) 

Industrial Education Offices, Classrooms, and Draf 

Industrial Education Shops (G-5) 

Industrial Education Wing, University School (1-8) 

Industrial Psychology Annex 4 (L-7) 

Information Service (F-6) 

Instructional Materials Classroom (L-7) 

Janitorial Services (K-7) 

Journalism, Egyptian (H-4) 

Journalism Annex (K-7) 

Kellogg Hall (K-4) 

Labor Institute (1-7) 

Latin American Institute (D-7) 

Laundry (E-4) 

Lentz Hall (J-4) 

Life Science Building (1-6) 

McAndrew Stadium (F-5) 

Machine Shop, Farm Quonset (H-4) 

Management (K-9) 

Marketing (J-7) 

Mathematics (J-9) 

Mathematics (J-9) 

Men's Physical Education Research (J-6) 

Mens Residence Halls (C, D-6) 

Methodist Foundation (F-9) 

Mississippi Valley Investigation (J-5) 

Morris Library (1-6) 



ALPHABETICAL LIST OF BUILDINGS (Continued) 



T132 
T27 



22 

29 

TI62 



T45 
TW2 
T68 
T70 
T71 
T69 
T60 
10 
30 
T33 
T37 
T108 
Tl 
T84 
T35 
T62 
TI03 
T93 
T90 
3539 
T108 
T32 
T65 
T18 
14 
15 
78 



Newman Foundation (D, E-8) 

Newman Foundation (Proposed) (D, E-9) 

Nursery and Psychology (K-5) 

Old Main (F-7) 

Parkinson laboratory (G-6) 

Personnel Office (F-6) 

Phi Sigma Kappa (M, N-4) 

Photographic Service (D-7) 

Photography Classroom (H-4) 

Physical Education and Military Training Building (Proposed) (G-3) 

Physical Education (H-10) 

Physical Education Ouonset (E-7) 

Physical Education Wing, University School (1-9) 

Pierce Hail (J-3) 

Pine Hills Station 

Placement Service (F-6) 

Plan "A" House (G-4) 

Power Plant (E-5) 

President's Office (H-7) 

Psychology (L-6) 

Psychology, Deportment of, Annex 1 (K-6) 

Psychology, Department of, Annex 2 (K-6) 

Psychology, Department of. Annex 3 (L-6) 

Psychology, Main Office (K-6) 

Psychology Perception Laboratory (K-7) 

Pump House (F-6) 

Pump House No. 2 (J-3) 

Purchasing and Accounting (H-6) 

Radio Studio (G-6) 

Reading Center (J-7) 

Recreation and Apartment (D-6) 

Recreation and Outdoor Education, Department of (D-8) 

Registrar (H-6) 

Rehabilitation Counselor Training (K-7) 

Rehabilitation Institute (K-7) 

Rehabilitation Institute Administrative Offices (K-7) 

Rehabilitation Perception Research (1-7) 

Residence Halls (J. K-4) 

Secondary Education (J-7) 

Secretary of Faculty (G-6) 

Sectioning Center (H-5) 

Security Officer (G-6) 

Service Building No. 1 (F-4) 

Service Building No. 2 (F-4) 

Shelter and Boat Dock (H, 1-3) 



6 


Shryock Auditorium (G-7) 


102 


Sigma Kappa (M-4) 


105 


Sigma Pi (L-3) 


107 


Sigma Sigma Sigma (M-4) 


T80 


Small Business Institute (L-9) 


37 


Smith Hall (K-4) 


T79 


Sociology (J-9) 


T104 


Sociology (J-9) 


T121 


Sociology (1-9) 


T36 


Southern Playhouse (H-6) 


T75 


Special Education, Department of (J-7) 


T38 


Speech, Department of and Classrooms (H-6) 


T61 


Speech and Hearing Clinic (K-7) 


T156 


Speech Correction, Department of (K-8) 


SI 


State of Illinois Public Health Laboratory (M-6) 


32 


Steagall Hall (J-3) 


11 


Steel Bleachers (F-5) 


T39 


Stenographic Service (H-6) 


9 


Storage (G-7) 


T10 


Storage Building (D-6) 


T19 


Student Affairs Office (G-6) 


T15 


Student Employment (F-6) 


106 


Tau Kappa Epsilon (M-3) 


T78 


Technical and Adult Education, Division of (H, 1-10) 


T191 


Technology, School of (Dean) (1-7) 


84 


Tennis Courts (F-3) 


T18 


Testing Center (G-6) 


114 


Theta Xi (M-4) 


205 


Trailer Court Service Building (B-6) 


T113 


Transportation Institute (D-8) 


T192 


Typography Laboratory (K-7) 


T158 


University Architect Construction Division (L-6) 


45 


University Center (G-6) 


H1-H76 


University Housing (F-9, F-10, G-5, G-9, J-5, J-6, K-5, K- 


Tl 17 


University Press (K-7) 


23 


University School (1-9) 


83 


Vice President, Office of (H-7) 


T161 


Virology Research Laboratory (M-6) 


36 


Warren Hall (K-4) 


8 


Wheeler Hall (F-8) 


T67 


Wildlife Research laboratory (J-6) 


24 


Woody Hall (G-8) 


T175 


Women's Physical Education Annex (C-7) 


T72 


Zoology (L-6) 



NUMERICAL LIST OF BUILDINGS 



1 


Old Main (f-7) 


2 


Altgeld Hall (G-7) 


3 


Allyn Building (G-6) 


4 


Parkinson Laboratory (G-6) 


5 


Anthony Hall. Area Services; Community Developme 




Community Development Services) Extension Service 




Service; Placement Service 


6 


Shryock Auditorium (G-7) 


7 


Gymnasium (F-7) 


8 


Wheeler Hall (F-8) 


9 


Storage (G-7) 


10 


Pump House (F-6) 


11 


Steel Bleachers (F-5) 


12 


Power Plant (E-5) 


13 


McAndrew Stadium (F-5) 


14 


Service Building No. 1 (F-4) 


15 


Service Building No. 2 (F-4) 


17 


Life Science Building (1-6) 


18 


Animal Building (1-6) 


19 


Greenhouses (1-6) 


20 


Electric Sub-Station No. 9 (1-6) 


21 


Industrial Education Wing, University School (1-8) 


22 


Physical Education Wing, University School (1-9) 


23 


University School (1-9) 


24 


Woody Hall (G-8) 


25 


Morris Library (1-6) 


26 


Agriculture Building 11-5) 


27 


Lentz Hall (J-4) 


28 


Bailey Hall (J-4) 


29 


Pierce Hall (J-3) 


30 


Pump House No. 2 (J-3) 


31 


Bowyer Hall (J-3) 


32 


Steagall Hall (J-3) 



33 


Brown Hall (K-3) 


34 


Felts Holl (K-4) 


35 


Kellogg Hall (K-4) 


36 


Warren Holl (K-4) 


37 


Smith Hall (K-4) 


38 


Abbott Hall (K-4) 


39 


Baldwin Hall (K-4) 


41 


Physical Education and Military Training Building (Proposed) (G-3) 


42 


Home Economics Building Group, Deportment of 




Anthropology (F, G-8) 


44 


College of Education (Proposed) (J-8) 


45 


University Center (G-6) 


56 


laundry (E 4) 


57 


Applied Science laboratory (E-4) 


78 


Shelter and Boat Dock (H. 1-3) 


79 


Beach House (J-2) 


80 


Chlorination Pump House (J-2) 


83 


Office of the Vice President (H-7) 


84 


Tennis Courts (F-3) 


101 


Delta Chi (M-4) 


102 


Sigma Kappa (M-4) 


103 


Delta Zeta (M-4) 


104 


Alpha Gamma Delta (1-4) 


105 


Sigma Pi (1-3) 


106 


Tau Kappa Epsilon (M-3) 


107 


Sigma Sigma Sigma (M-4) 


108-112 


Group Housing (M-3, 4) 


113 


Phi Sigma Kappo (M. N-4) 


114 


Theto Xi (M-4) 


115-116 


Group Housing (N-4) 


117-137 


Family Housing (B, C, D-l, 2, 3) 


205 


Trailer Court Service Building (B-6) 



I ~ 



I 



1 M | ~~N~ 



Carbondale Campus 




10 



1 i 



11 



M | N 



NUMERICAL LIST OF BUILDINGS (Continued) 



H1-H76 
H32 



University Housing (F-9 
Men's Physical Educali 



10; G-5. 9; J, K-5, 6) 
,n Research (J-6) 



Tl 

T2-T9 

T10 

T13 
T14 
T15 

T18 
TI9 
T25 
T26 
T27 
T29 
T31 
T32 

T33 
T34 
T35 
T36 
T37 
T38 
T39 



T42 
T44 
T45 
T48 
157 
T58 
T60 
T61 
T62 
T63 
T65 
T66 
T67 
T68 
T69 
T70 
T71 
T72 
T73 
T74 
775 
T76 
T77 



Baptist Foundation (H-7) 

Baptist Foundation (J-7) 

Christian Foundation |E. F-8) 

Methodist Foundation (F-9) 

Episcopal Foundation (1-10) 

Newman Foundation (D, E-8) 

Newman Foundation (Proposed) (D, E-9) 



State of Illinois Public Health Laboratory (M-6) 



Recreation and Apartment (D-6) 

Men's Residence Halls (C. D-6) 

Storage Building (D-6) 

Personnel Office (F-6) 

Alumni Service (F-6) 

Student Employment (F-6) 

Housing Office; Security Officer; Testing Center (G-6) 

Student Affairs Office (G-6) 

Industrial Education Shops (G-5) 

Industrial Education Offices, Classrooms, and Drafting Room (H-4) 

Industrial Education Classroom; Photography Classroom (H-4) 

Farm Quonset Machine Shop (H-4) 

Department of Economics (G-6) 

Deportment of Accounting; School of Business; Secretary of 

Faculty (G-6) 
Accounting; Business Manager; Purchasing (H-6) 
Bursar (H 6) 

Auditor; Registrar (H-6) 
Southern Playhouse (H-6) 
Radio Studio (G-6) 

Department of Speech, and Classrooms (H-6) 
Central Mailing; Data Processing and Computing Center; 

Stenographic Service (H-6) 
Education Classrooms (H-5) 
Education Classrooms (H-6) 
Education Administration (H-5, 6) 
Health Service (D-6, 7) 
President's Office (H-7) 
Egyptian; Journalism (H-4) 
Illinois Avenue Residence Hall (F-9) 
Physical Education Quonset (E-7) 
Psychology Perception Laboratory (K-7) 
Speech and Hearing Clinic (K-7) 
Rehabilitation Counselor Training (K-7) 
AFROTC Supply (F-7) 

Advisement Center; Sectioning Center (H-5) 
Central Clinical Services (J-6) 
Wildlife Research laboratory (J-6) 
Department of Psychology, Annex 1 (K-6) 
Department of Psychology, Main Office (K-6) 
Department of Psychology, Annex 2 (K-6) 
Department of Psychology, Annex 3 (L-6) 
Zoology (L-6) 

Industrial Psychology, Annex 4 (1-7) 
Department of Guidance (J-7) 
Department of Special Education (J-7) 
Physical Education (H-10) 
Dean of Graduate School (H-10) 



T78 


Division of Technical and Adult Education (H, 1-10) 




T79 


Sociology (J-9) 




T80 


Small Business Institute (1-9) 




T84 


Department of Recreation and Outdoor Education (D-8) 




T85 


Civil Defense; Health Education and Safety (D-8) 




T86 


Central Publications (D-8) 




T87 


Area Psychological Service (C-8) 




T90 


Rehabilitation Perception Research (1-7) 




T91 


Department of English (J-9) 




T92 


lotin American Institute (D-7) 




T93 


Rehabilitation Institute Administrative Offices (K-7) 


T94 


Botany and Zoology (J-6) 




T95 


Nursery and Psychology (K-5) 




T96 


American Board Examiners, Psychology (1-7) 




T98 


Health Service (D-7) 




T99 


Central Research Shop (1-7) 




T100 


Coordinator of Research (1-8) 




T101 


Co-operative Wildlife Research (J-7) 




T102 


Department of English (G-9) 




T103 


Rehabilitation Institute (K-7) 




T104 


Sociology (J-9) 


T105 


Geography; Climatology Laboratory (J-5) 




T106 


Cartographic Office; Mississippi Valley Investigation (J-5) 




T107 


Geology (K-5) 




T108 


Reading Center; Secondary Education (J-7) 




T109 


Marketing (J-7) 




110-T111 


Mathematics (J-9) 




Tl 13 


Transportation Institute (D-8) 




T115 


Film Production Units (L-7) 




T116 


Asian Studies (M-8) 




T117 


University Press (K-7) 




Tl 19 


Geology (K-6) 




T120 


Plan "A" House (G-4) 




T121 


Sociology (1-9) 




T124 


Labor Institute (1-7) 




T125 


Design (J-5) 




T126 


Design (J, K-6) 




128-T129 


Design (J, K-6) 




T130 


College of Education (J, K-7) 




T132 


Photographic Service (D-7) 




T135 


Faculty Club (G-4) 




T136 


Department of English (G-9) 




T137 


Department of Government (H-10) 




T138 


Department of Health Education (1-8) 




T141 


Educational Television Research (K-7) 




T142 


Psychology (1-6) 




T144 


Department of Higher Education (H-10) 




T145 


School of Business (Dean) (1-9) 




T146 


Management (K-9) 




T149 


Design Shop A (K-6) 


T150 


Design Shop B (J-6) 


T151 


Design Shop C (J-6) 




T152 


Design Shop D (K-6) 




T155 


Dewey Editorship (M-8) 




T156 


Department of Speech Correction (K-8) 




T157 


General Improvements (B, C-7) 




T158 


University Architect Construction Division (L-6) 




T159 


Art Annex No. 1 (C-7) 


" 


T161 


Virology Research Laboratory (M-6) 




T162 


Pine Hills Station; Economics Annex (L-6) 




T163 


Janitorial Services (K-7) 




T167 


Center for Study of Crime, Delinquency, and Corrections (K-9) 


T169 


Instructional Materials Classroom (L-7) 




T171 


Geography Annex 2 (M-7) 




T173 


Geography Annex 1 (M-7) 




T175 


Women's Physical Education Annex (C-7) 




T176 


Botany Research (L-8) 




T182 


Art Annex No. 2 (B-7) 




TI85 


Journalism Annex (K-7) 




T191 


School of Technology (Dean) (1-7) 




T192 


Typography laboratory (K-7) 




T196 


Department of English (1-9) 





12 



Schedule of Classes 



the following material may be of value in interpreting the information 
appearing in the class schedule. 



LISTING OF COURSES 

GENERAL STUDIES COURSES 

Courses which students are to take to meet the General Studies re- 
quirements are listed in the front of the Schedule of Classes. These courses 
are listed by the area which they satisfy and within the area by course 
number and section number. 



DEPARTMENTAL COURSES 

Departments in which courses are being offered are listed in alpha- 
betical order. Courses within each department are listed in order by course 
number and section number. For a list of academic units and the depart- 
ments within each, see page 51. 



COURSE NUMBERS AND HOURS 

The column containing this information shows the number of the 
course first, followed by the number of hours of credit. Course numbers 
are three digit numbers. In some cases the three digits may be followed by 
a letter which is also part of the course number. The number appearing 
after the hyphen denotes the hours of credit for the course. In some cases 
there may be more than one number following the course number such 

13 



as 599-2 to 5. This represents a variable-hour course in which the student 
decides the number of hours for which he is going to register in consulta- 
tion with his adviser. 

The course numbering system is as follows: 

000-099 Course not properly falling in the following categories 

100-199 For freshmen 

200-299 For sophomores 

300-399 For juniors and seniors 

400^99 For seniors and graduate students 

500-600 For graduate students only 



PREREQUISITE 

The prerequisite column lists requirements which must be satisfied 
before a student registers for the course. These prerequisites may be listed 
in various ways. Usually they are other courses in the same department, 
indicated by a course number. A prerequisite in another department is in- 
dicated by the department's code letters and the course number. 

The listing of prerequisites provides ready information for students. 
An effort has been made to have the listing be as complete as possible but 
this is not guaranteed. For the. official listing of course descriptions and 
prerequisites, a student needs to consult the bulletin of the academic unit 
within which the department is located. 



SECTION NUMBER, TIME, AND DAYS 

The times given indicate the beginning and ending of each class 
period. Students registering for courses listed as "to be arranged" may ob- 
tain times and days from instructor indicated or, if no instructor is listed, 
from the department chairman offering the course. 

The letter T preceding a section number indicates that the section 
has been tentatively scheduled and will be opened for registration only if 
staff is available. 



BUILDING AND ROOM NUMBER 

The following list of building abbreviations will help in the location 
of classrooms. Buildings are listed alphabetically according to the code 
used in the class schedule. The numbers refer to the map on page 10. 
Temporary buildings, which are indicated in the schedule by the letter T 

14 



or H followed by a number, and religious foundations, which are indi- 
cated by the letter R and a number, are listed on page 12. 

code: building name — number map key code: building name — number map key 



A: Allyn Building— 3 


G-6 


Ag: Agriculture Building — 26 


1-4 


Alg: Altgeld Hall— 2 


1-7 


ApS: Applied Science Laboratory — 57 


B-5 


Aud: Shryock Auditorium — 6 


H-6 


Bailey: Bailey Hall— 28 


1-3 


BowlingA: Bowling Alley — 46 


G-6 


Browne: Browne Auditorium — 9 


H-6 


BrownH: Brown Hall— 33 


1-3 


Ed: Education Building — 44 


J-8 


Felts: Felts Hall— 34 


1-3 


Furr: Furr Auditorium 




(in USch)— 23 


M-7 


Gym: Gymnasium — 7 


F-7 


HEc: Home Economics Building — 42 


1-8 


Lake: Lake on the Campus 


2,3 


Lib: Morris Library — 25 


J-5 



LG: Little Grassy Lake 

LS: Life Science Building — 17 

M: Old Main— 1 

Office: Office of the department 

P: Parkinson Building — 4 

Pierce: Pierce Hall— 29 

Pool: University Swimming Pool 

Quon: Quonset Hut— T 58 

RadS: Radio Studios— T 37 

Stables: Stables at Little Grassy Lake 

Stadium: McAndrew Stadium — 13 

Tennis: Tennis Courts 

USch: University School— 23 

USchI: Industrial Education — 21 

VTI: Vocational-Technical Institute 

(Southern Acres) 
Wh: Wheeler Hall— 8 



K-4 
G-7 

G-6 

1-3 

22 M-6 

F-8 

H-6 



E-6 

M-7 
L-6 



H-7 



If a building contains more than one classroom, then the number of 
the room follows the building's code name. A building code which contains 
a number is separated from the room number by the letter R. (For ex- 
ample, "T32 Rill" means room 1 1 1 in building T32.) 



FRESHMAN CONVOCATIONS 

In order to establish a continuing interest in general education, a fresh- 
man convocation is held each week. All freshmen are required to register 
for convocations each quarter. Although no degree credit is granted, at- 
tendance is recorded. Each freshman must present a satisfactory attendance 
record of at least nine convocations per quarter for three quarters. 



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&UNDAT1CT 



Southern Illinois University Foundation 

The Southern Illinois University Foundation is a nonprofit corporation 
chartered by the state and authorized by the Board of Trustees to receive 
gifts for the benefit of the University, to buy and sell property, and otherwise 
to serve the University. 

It respectfully asks alumni and other citizens of Southern Illinois to con- 
sider making gifts and bequests to benefit the University. Such gifts should be 
conveyed to the Foundation, with proper stipulation as to their uses. The 
Foundation, through its officers and members, will be glad to confer with in- 
tending donors regarding suitable clauses to insert in wills and suitable 
forms of gifts and memorials, including bequests by means of life insurance. 
Large or small gifts to the library will be appreciated; likewise, gifts for spe- 
cial equipment, buildings, endowment of professorships in particular subjects, 
gifts to student loan funds and scholarship funds, gifts for the use of foreign 
students, and endowments for particular sorts of research. Any gifts or be- 
quests can be given suitable memorial names. 
The staff members of the Foundation are 

Mr. Kenneth R. Miller, Executive Director, Carbondale, Illinois 

Mrs. Lois H. Nelson, Secretary, Carbondale, Illinois 

Mr. Robert L. Gallegly, Treasurer, Carbondale, Illinois 

Mr. C. Eugene Peebles, Assistant Treasurer, Edwardsville, Illinois 

Mr. C. Richard Gruny, Legal Counsel, Carbondale, Illinois 

Mr. L. James Struif, Assistant Legal Counsel, Edwardsville, Illinois 

Mr. Donald Leavitt, Patent Counsel, St. Louis, Missouri 

Mr. Warren Stookey, Field Representative, Edwardsville, Illinois. 



Southern Illinois 




ersity 



w 





ARDSVILLE CAMPUS 1962-64 

on, East St. Louis, Edwardsville 



n il 



T T. 



Edwardsville Campus 

Announcements for 1962-1964 




SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 
Volume 5 Number 5 April 17, 1963 

Second-class postage paid at Carbondale, Illinois. Pub- 
lished by Southern Illinois University, monthly except 
semimonthly in April, June, and September. 



The following issues of the Southern Illinois University Bulletin 

may be obtained without charge from Central Publications, 

Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois. 

General Information 

Financial Assistance 

Summer Session (Carbondale) 

Summer Session (Edwardsville) 

Schedule of Classes (Carbondale) 

Schedule of Classes (Edwardsville) 

Divisional Announcements (Edwardsville) 

Graduate School 

College of Education 

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 

School of Agriculture 

School of Applied Science 

School of Business 
School of Communications 

School of Fine Arts 

School of Home Economics 

University Institutes 

Division of Technical and Adult Education 

All intending students should have the General Information 
bulletin (issued once a year), plus the special bulletins of the 
various educational units in which they are most interested. 



Composed and printed by Printing Service 

Southern Illinois University 

Carbondale, Illinois 



Board of Trustees 



TERM EXPIRES 

John Page Wham, Chairman, Centralia 1965 

Kenneth L. Davis, Vice -Chairman, Harrisburg 1963 

Melvin C. Lockard, Secretary, Mattoon 1965 

Martin Van Brown, Carbondale 1967 

Harold R. Fischer, Granite City 1963 

Arnold H. Maremont, Winnetka 1967 

Lindell W. Sturgis, Metropolis 1965 
Ray Page (Ex-Officio) , Springfield 
Louise Morehouse, Recorder 



Officers of Instruction 



Delyte W. Morris, President 

Charles D. Tenney, Vice-President for Instruction 

EDWARDSVILLE CAMPUS 

Clarence W. Stephens, Vice-President for Operations 

William T. Going, Dean of Instruction 

John H. Schnabel, Registrar and Director of Admissions 

Business Division, John J. Glynn, Head 

Education Division, Cameron W. Meredith, Head 

Fine Arts Division, Andrew J. Koch man, Head 

Humanities Division, Nicholas T. Joost, Head 

Science and Technology Division, Kermit G. Clemans, Head 

Social Sciences Division, Herbert H. Rosenthal, Head 



This Bulletin 

covers in detail questions 
concerning the Edwards- 
ville Campus. It does not 
cover all questions con- 
cerning Southern Illinois 
University. For complete 
information about the 
University the prospective 
student should refer to the 
General Information bul- 
letin. 



Table of Contents 



University Calendar, 1963-1964 vi 

The University 1 

Location 1 

Sessions 2 

Regulations 2 

Edwardsville Campus 3 

Programs of Instruction 4 

Bachelor's Degree Programs 4 

Preprofessional Programs 4 

Graduate Programs 4 

Admission to the University 5 

Tuition and Fees - 5 

Advisement for Registration 6 

Registration Information 6 

Requirements for a Bachelor's Degree 6 

Outline of General Studies Requirements 7 

Concentration Requirements 8 

Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements 9 

Business Division 1 1 

Education Division 27 

Fine Arts Division 52 

Humanities Division 65 

Science and Technology Division 79 

Social Sciences Division 95 

Technical and Adult Education 115 

Index 119 

v 



University Calendar, 1963-1964 

Revised January 1963 

1963 SUMMER SESSION 

Session Begins Monday, June 17 

Independence Day Holiday Thursday, July 4 

Final Examinations (8-week Session) Wednesday-Thursday, August 7-8 
Summer Commencements Friday, August 9 

Final Examinations (Summer Quarter) Monday-Saturday, August 26-31 



1963 FALL QUARTER 



New Student Week 
Quarter Begins 
Thanksgiving Vacation 

Final Examinations 



Sunday-Tuesday, September 22-24 

Wednesday, September 25 

Wednesday, 12 noon-Monday, 8 a.m, 

November 27-December 2 

Wednesday-Tuesday, December 11-17 



Quarter Begins 
Final Examinations 



1964 WINTER QUARTER 



Thursday, January 2 
Wednesday-Tuesday, March 11-17 



1964 SPRING QUARTER 



Quarter Begins 
Memorial Day Holiday 
Final Examinations 
Commencement (Edwardsville) 
Commencement (Carbondale) 



Wednesday, March 25 

Saturday, May 30 

Thursday- Wednesday, June 4-10 

Thursday, June 11 

Friday, June 12 



Summer classes begin on Tuesday, June 18. During the fall, 
winter, and spring quarters, classes begin on the second day of 
the quarter. 



VI 



The University 



Southern Illinois University was established in 1869 as Southern Illinois 
Normal University. The shortened name became official in 1947 by action 
of the state legislature. 

For some years after its establishment, Southern operated as a two- 
year normal school. In 1907 it became a four-year, degree-granting in- 
stitution, though continuing its two-year course until 1936. In 1943 the 
state legislature changed the institution, which had been in theory ex- 
clusively a teacher-training school, into a university, thereby taking official 
recognition of the great demand in the area for diversified training. 

The Graduate School, approved in 1943, at first granted only the 
Master of Science in Education degree. In 1948 it was authorized to grant 
also the Master of Arts and Master of Science degrees. In 1952 the Master 
of Fine Arts degree was added to this list, and in 1955 the Doctor of 
Philosophy degree was added. The Master of Music and the Master of 
Music Education degrees were authorized in 1956. 

In 1949 the Belleville Residence Center was established and the Alton 
and East St. Louis residence centers in 1957. In 1958 the Southwestern Illi- 
nois Residence Office was created to co-ordinate and direct the University's 
educational activities in the Madison-St. Clair counties area. As a result of 
substantial purchases of land by the citizens of the area, a new campus 
at Edwardsville, co-ordinate with the campus at Carbondale, is now being 
developed. 



LOCATION 

Carbondale is located at the intersection of Highways U.S. 51 and 
Illinois 13 and is served by the Illinois Central Railroad. 

The new campus site southwest of Edwardsville is on By-pass 66, but 



1 



2 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

temporarily instruction is carried on at Alton and East St. Louis. The 
facilities of the former Shurtleff College have been leased by the University 
for the operation of the Alton Center. The East St. Louis Center is located 
in the former East St. Louis high school building on Tenth and Ohio 
streets. 



SESSIONS 

The nine-month academic year is divided into three quarters. The 
fall quarter opens near the middle of September and closes just prior to the 
Christmas vacation period. The winter quarter begins early in January and 
ends around the middle of March. The spring quarter begins the latter part 
of March and ends about the second week in June. Definite dates for each 
quarter may be found in the University Calendar. 

In addition to the three regular quarters, there are a two-month sum- 
mer session and a full summer quarter which begin immediately following 
the close of the spring quarter. The summer session consists of a compre- 
hensive program of courses offered by most departments and divisions of 
the University. In addition to the courses which run the full two or three 
months, there are workshops and short courses of lesser duration. 



REGULATIONS 

The University and its various instructional units reserve the right to 
change the rules regulating admission, instruction, and graduation; to 
change courses and fees; and to change any other regulation affecting the 
student body. Such regulations shall go into force whenever the proper 
authorities so determine, and shall apply both to prospective students and 
to those who have enrolled in the University. 

Each student must assume responsibility for his progress by keeping 
an up-to-date record of the courses he has taken and by checking period- 
ically with his adviser. Responsibility for errors in program or in interpre- 
tation of regulations of the University rests entirely upon the student. 
Advice is always available on request. 

A copy of the regulations governing student life may be obtained from 
the Student Affairs Office on the campus which the student attends. 



Edwardsville Campus 



the first residence center of Southern Illinois University was established 
in 1949 at Belleville under the auspices of the Graduate School and the 
Division of University Extension. Limited to an evening program, it of- 
fered classes almost exclusively for in-service training of teachers. 

In the summer of 1957, a residence center was established at Alton on 
the former Shurtleff College campus, and in September of the same year 
a residence center opened in East St. Louis. 

During the year 1958-59 the communities of Madison and St. Clair 
counties joined hands to help provide for the program in southwestern 
Illinois a large central campus site, located southwest of Edwardsville on 
By-pass 66. The central administrative offices of the Edwardsville Campus 
are housed on this site. 

In Alton eight permanent buildings form the nucleus of a 40-acre 
campus. Eleven additional buildings have been prepared on a temporary 
basis to meet the needs of an expanded undergraduate and graduate pro- 
gram. 

The East St. Louis center occupies a city block facing Ohio Street at 
Ninth and Tenth. Laboratories, classrooms, libraries, and other facilities 
of a former senior high school have been redesigned and re-equipped to 
provide for a comprehensive undergraduate and graduate program. Faculty 
offices are located in nearby temporary buildings. 



PROGRAMS OF INSTRUCTION 

The academic organization of the Edwardsville Campus comprises a 
general studies program and six major divisions of instruction, with a num- 
ber of programs in each division. 



SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



BACHELOR'S DEGREE PROGRAMS 

The six academic divisions of the Edwardsville Campus prepare stu- 
dents for the following degrees: Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), Bachelor of Sci- 
ence (B.S.), Bachelor of Science in Education (B.S. in Ed.), and Bachelor 
of Music (B. Mus.). Programs leading to these degrees are described in 
subsequent chapters of this bulletin. 



PREPROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS 

Preprofessional students may obtain, subject to certain conditions, a 
bachelor's degree after three years' work (144 quarter hours) at Southern 
and one or more years' work in a professional school. During their three 
years of residence at Southern they need to have completed all requirements 
other than elective hours for the bachelor's degree which they are seeking. 
In some cases the completion of concentration requirements is possible by 
their taking certain courses at the professional school, but this is permitted 
only upon the prior approval of the appropriate divisional head. Also, there 
needs to be completion of at least one year of professional work with accept- 
able grades in a Class A medical school, a Class A dental school, a Class A 
veterinary school, or an approved law school. In all cases, all University 
graduation requirements must be met. It is advisable for a student interested 
in this program to make his decision to seek a bachelor's degree before enter- 
ing the professional school so that any questions may be clarified at an 
early date. 

Students working toward the Bachelor of Science in Agriculture degree 
may attend the Edwardsville Campus their freshman year and transfer 
to the Carbondale Campus for the completion of the degree. In preparing 
for one of the agricultural professions, the student should follow closely the 
appropriate curriculum as suggested in the School of Agriculture bulletin. 

Students working toward a Bachelor of Science degree in home eco- 
nomics may attend the Edwardsville Campus their freshman and sopho- 
more years and transfer to the Carbondale Campus for the completion of 
the degree. In preparing for this degree, the student should follow closely 
the appropriate curriculum in the School of Home Economics bulletin. 

GRADUATE PROGRAMS 

For information concerning programs leading to master's degrees and 
the Doctor of Philosophy degree, refer to the Graduate School issue of the 
Southern Illinois University Bulletin. 



EDWARDSVILLE CAMPUS 5 

The purpose of graduate course offerings is to make available to ad- 
vanced students courses and other work which will increase their com- 
petencies in particular fields. Development of the power of independent 
investigation is especially sought. The association of mature and beginning 
scholars is an important aspect of graduate work and is encouraged. Major 
study may be done in educational administration and supervision, elemen- 
tary education, guidance, secondary education, and special education. 
Graduate courses in other areas are also available. 



complete details concerning admission, tuition, fees, and student 
employment are given in the General Information bulletin. For a 
free copy write to Central Publications, Southern Illinois Univer- 
sity, Carbondale, Illinois. 



ADMISSION TO THE UNIVERSITY 

All inquiries concerning admission to the Edwardsville Campus of 
Southern Illinois University should be directed to the Registrar's Office, 
Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville, Illinois. Application for admis- 
sion and transcripts of high school and previous college work should be 
in the Registrar's Office at least thirty days in advance of the desired en- 
trance date. Applications for admission may be submitted earlier if desired. 
High school seniors should apply for admission at the beginning of the 
last semester of the senior year. 

Many students find it helpful to visit the campus prior to making ap- 
plication for admission. The University encourages such visits and wel- 
comes interviews with prospective students. 

Students desiring to pursue a master's degree program should refer 
to the Graduate School bulletin and consult with the graduate adviser in 
the Graduate Office at the Alton or East St. Louis center. 

For regulations and procedures see the General Information issue of 
the Southern Illinois University Bulletin. 



TUITION AND FEES 

At the present time legal residents of Illinois registered for more than 
eight hours pay a total of $61.50 per quarter. This includes $42.00 tuition, 
a $5.00 book rental fee, a $5.00 student union building fund fee, and a 



6 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

$9.50 student activity fee. Out-of-state students pay an additional $50.00 
tuition, or a total of $111.50. Students registered for eight hours or fewer 
pay one-half tuition, one-half book rental fee, and full student union 
building fund fee; they have the option of paying the student activity fee. 



ADVISEMENT FOR REGISTRATION 

To insure that an undergraduate student is properly advised on a 
course of study which will both broaden his background and prepare him 
for his chosen career, the Edwardsville Campus has made academic advise- 
ment a major concern of a chief academic adviser (at each center) and his 
staff and the division heads and their staffs. 

Advisement sessions for the new freshmen are held during the summer 
and as part of New Student Orientation each fall. Each new transfer stu- 
dent should plan to meet with his adviser prior to initial registration; ap- 
pointments can be initiated by calling the office of Academic Advisement. 



REGISTRATION INFORMATION 

Registration for classes on the Edwardsville Campus is completed at 
the enrollment division of the Registrar's Office at the Alton and East St. 
Louis centers. Southern uses a system of advance registration in which 
the period of time from the third through the tenth week of each quarter 
is used for registration for the following quarter. All students are expected 
to take advantage of the advance registration period. A new student may 
also register on the opening day of each quarter. 

Registration for any session of the University is contingent upon being 
eligible for registration. Thus a registration including the payment of tuition 
and fees may be considered invalid if the student is declared to be ineligible 
to register due to scholastic reasons. The same situation may exist due to 
financial reasons or to disciplinary reasons if certified to the registrar by 
the Director of Student Affairs. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR THE 
BACHELOR'S DEGREE 

Each candidate for the degree must complete 192 hours of credit in 
approved courses. At least 64 hours must be in 300-level courses or above. 
Each student must have a C average and grades not lower than C in sub- 



EDWARDSVILLE CAMPUS 7 

jects aggregating at least three- fourths of the work. A C average is re- 
quired in the field of concentration. These averages are required for credit 
made at Southern as well as for the total record. A transfer student must 
present either a total of three years of work (144 hours) earned at Southern 
or 48 senior college hours earned at Southern, 16 of which may be earned 
in extension. 

Every bachelor's degree candidate is expected to meet the University's 
general requirements and to follow the recommendations of his academic 
unit. The general requirements have been undergoing intensive study with 
a view to giving the students further options and providing them with a 
more effective background not only for their professional careers but also 
for their standing as citizens in the communities to which they go after 
graduation. This study has resulted in the initiation of a new General 
Studies program. During the period of transition from the old program to 
the new, students who have begun their work in the old program will con- 
tinue in it. Courses to satisfy the old requirements will continue to be avail- 
able for several quarters after the inauguration of the new program. The 
first of the General Studies courses were available for the 1962 fall quarter. 
The new requirements are outlined below. The old are summarized in the 
1961-62 General Announcements bulletin. 



OUTLINE OF GENERAL STUDIES REQUIREMENTS 

Area A: Mans Physical Environment and Biological Inheritance.... 24 hours 
A first-level basic sequence 9 hours 

A second-level continuation sequence 9 hours 

Third-level advanced courses 6 hours 

Area B: Mans Social Inheritance and Social Responsibilities 24 hours 

A first-level basic sequence 9 hours 

A second-level continuation sequence 9 hours 

Third-level advanced courses 6 hours 

Area C: Man's Insights and Appreciations 24 hours 

A first-level basic sequence 9 hours 

A second-level continuation sequence 9 hours 

Third-level advanced courses 6 hours 

Area D: Organization and Communication of Ideas 18 hours 

Required college composition and speech 9 hours 

Either a foreign language sequence or a basic 

mathematics sequence 9 hours 

Area E: Health and Physical Development 6 hours 

First-level required physical education 3 hours 

Second-level required health education 3 hours 



8 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

Specific courses available in these areas are described in the General 
Information bulletin and listed in the Schedule of Classes. 

There are three ways in which partial requirements of the General 
Studies program may be met without taking the courses specifically de- 
signed to meet those requirements. They are waivers, advanced-standing 
assignments, and proficiency examinations. These are described in the 
General Information bulletin. 

The physical education requirement can be waived only by the Grad- 
uation Appeals Committee upon the recommendation of a physician 
approved by the University. Waiver procedure should be initiated early in 
the student's college course and in no case later than the end of the sopho- 
more year. Any student thirty years of age or older is not subject to this 
requirement. 

Because of the importance of written and oral communication, each 
full-time student must enroll each quarter in English Composition until the 
required sequence has been satisfactorily passed. A transfer student will be 
granted English proficiency credit only in those composition courses in 
which he has received a grade of C or better at an accredited institution. 
(Proficiency credit in courses with grades lower than C will be at the dis- 
position of the English faculty, approved by the head of the Humanities 
Division.) 

CONCENTRATION REQUIREMENTS 

Every degree candidate is expected to follow the basic program set 
out here, plus the advanced work recommended by the division in which 
he expects to concentrate as indicated in the following pages of this bulletin. 
If the student intends to take his degree elsewhere, the adviser may recom- 
mend changes in these requirements in favor of those of the institution 
from which the student plans to be graduated. If the student changes his 
mind and decides to take his degree at Southern, none of the degree re- 
quirements can be waived. 

EXCEPTIONS 

A student may satisfy any of the above requirements by passing non- 
credit attainment tests. (These tests, which may be taken only one time, 
must be applied for before the middle of the quarter in which the noncredit 
pass is to appear on the student's record.) In some cases, more advanced 
work may be substituted for the required courses listed. A student who 
transfers in his junior or senior year may substitute senior college courses 
in most areas for the freshman and sophomore courses listed previously. 



EDWARDSVILLE CAMPUS 



APPLICATION FOR GRADUATION 

Every degree candidate should signify his intention to graduate by 
making application for graduation no later than the first week of his last 
quarter in attendance before the desired graduation date. Therefore, a person 
desiring to graduate in the June commencement must make application for 
graduation during the first week of the spring quarter. The application 
forms are available in the Registrar's Office. 



BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 
REQUIREMENTS 

In addition to the University's general requirements for a bachelor's 
degree, a person working toward a Bachelor of Arts degree must have the 
following: 

1. A reading knowledge of a foreign language, ordinarily requiring 9 
hours of university study or its equivalent. 

2. A course in either philosophy or psychology (or a General Studies 
equivalent in those fields) . 

3. A primary concentration of at least 42 hours and a secondary con- 
centration of at least 24 hours. Some areas of concentration require more 
than the minimum number of hours. 



Business Division 



Accounting; Economics; Management; Marketing; Secretarial and 
Business Education 

The Business Division seeks to prepare the student for successful perform- 
ance in the business world. Opportunity is provided for the student to gain 
a knowledge of the operational phases of business and a familiarity with 
the sources of information and methods of collecting and interpreting data. 
The programs seek to develop in the student an understanding of, and a 
skill in, the art of human relations and a high sense of integrity and re- 
sponsibility. 

Professor Walter L. Blackledge, Ph.D. (Iowa) 1959 

Professor Leo Cohen, Ph.D. (California) 1959 

Associate Professor Mary Margaret Brady, Ed.D. (New York) 1957 

Associate Professor John E. Dwyer, M.B.A. (Chicago) 1962 

Associate Professor John J. Glynn, Ph.D. (St. Louis) 1957 

Associate Professor John V. Meador, Ph.D. (Iowa) 1962 

Associate Professor Richard J. Milles, M.S. in C. (St. Louis) 1960 

Associate Professor Joe R. Small, M.B.A. (Kansas) 1958 

Assistant Professor Donald P. Bedel, M.B.A. (St. Louis) 1962 

Assistant Professor Richard L. Davison, M.S. (Illinois) 1959 

Assistant Professor Robert W. Eckles, M.B.A. (Miami, Ohio) 1962 

Assistant Professor David C. Luan, Ph.D. (Texas) 1960 
Assistant Professor Kenneth E. Martin, M.S. (Kansas State) 1958-59; 1962 

Assistant Professor Norbert V. Schmitt, M.S. in C. (St. Louis) 1958 

Assistant Professor Paul R. Tarpey, M.S. (Oklahoma State) 1962 

Assistant Professor Thomas E. VanDahm, Ph.D. (Michigan) 1960 

Assistant Professor Clarence E. Vincent, D.B.A. (Indiana) 1960 

Instructor Emery R. Casstevens, B.S.E.E. (U. S. Nava! Academy) 1959 

Instructor Virgil I. Pinkstaff, M.A. (Washington University) 1957 

11 



12 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

Instructor Karl A. Sauber, B.S. (Kent State) 1960 



Lecturer Dale F. Blount, B.S. (Rockhurst) 1960 

Lecturer Daniel B. Bosse, M.B.A. (Indiana) 1959-63 

Lecturer Norman J. Bucher, M.S. in C. (St. Louis) 1962-63 

Lecturer Alice Marie Burkhead, M.B.A. (Texas) 1961-62 

Lecturer Dona F. Frost, M.S. (North Dakota) 1961-63 

Lecturer John Ingwersen, M.B.A. (New York) 1960 

Lecturer Donald R. McCauley, M.B.A. (Texas A. & M.) 1961-62 

Lecturer Richard N. McKinney, M.A. (Iowa) 1961-63 
Lecturer Robert J. Motley, M.A. (State Teachers College, 

Kirksville, Mo.) 1962-63 

Lecturer Ann S. Schwier, Ph.D. (St. Louis) 1960-63 

Lecturer Paul J. Skjerseth, M.B.A. (Indiana) 1960-63 

The Bachelor of Science degree may be earned in the Business Division 
with the following concentrations: accounting, economics, management, 
marketing, secretarial and business education. The Bachelor of Arts degree 
may be earned in the Social Sciences Division in economics. The Bachelor 
of Science in Education degree may be earned in the Education Division 
in secretarial and business education or in economics. 



DIVISIONAL REQUIREMENTS 

The following courses are required of all candidates for the Bachelor 
of Science degree in the Business Division as well as all students electing a 
primary concentration within the division: Accounting 251, 252, 253, Eco- 
nomics 205, 206 (or the General Studies equivalents), and Marketing 230. 
The student should have at least 77 quarter hours in the Business Division 
and at least 77 outside the division. 



ACCOUNTING 

Accounting is the means by which the many transactions of business 
are analyzed, recorded, presented, and interpreted. The ability to analyze, 
present, and interpret is not acquired easily; it is one that takes thorough 
and serious study. 

The accounting program is designed to develop those abilities which 
lead to professional positions in cost accounting, auditing, income tax, 
financial statement analysis, and general financial accounting. The opera- 



ACCOUNTING 13 

tion of a business and its financial condition are of interest to its owners, 
to its employees, to its creditors, to the various governmental bodies, and 
to the public. 

The accounting curriculum is designed to cover four basic areas of 
study; theory, cost accounting, tax, and auditing. In addition to the four 
basic areas, special courses are offered in governmental accounting, ac- 
counting systems, and Certified Public Accountant problems. Although in- 
dividuals trained in accounting might work in private industrial firms, 
public accounting firms, governmental agencies, or in college teaching, the 
four basic areas in accounting are needed as background. Those individuals 
desiring to engage in public accounting in Illinois should familiarize them- 
selves with the Illinois laws and regulations covering the certification of 
certified public accountants. The regulations are published by the Com- 
mittee on Accountancy, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois. 

SUGGESTED CURRICULUM 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 

General Studies Requirements (See page 7. Waive GSB 151, 152, 

153.) 87 

Business Division Requirements (See page 12.) 26 

Accounting Concentration Requirements 68-70 

Accounting 331, 341, 351, 352, 353, 356, 442 29 

Accounting 355, 432, 458, 459, 461 (any one) 3-4 

Economics 307, 315, 317 or 470 11-12 

Management 170, 271, 320, 340 or 380, 371, 372 or 373 25 

Electives 9-11 

Total 192 



SECONDARY CONCENTRATION 

A 24-hour concentration in accounting consists of 251, 252, 253, 8 hours 
of senior credit courses (300-499) in accounting, and Management 170. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

251-4, 252-4, 253-4. ELEMENTARY ACCOUNTING I, II, III. Principles and 
practices in handling transactions in books of original entry and books 
of accounts — trial balances, adjustments, and financial statements — for 
proprietorships, partnerships, and corporations. Basic problems concern- 
ing statement analysis, presentation, and interpretation. 

301-1 to 6. ACCOUNTING READINGS. Directed readings in books and peri- 



14 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

odicals in a defined field, under supervision of one or more staff mem- 
bers. Periodic written and oral reports are required. Prerequisite: junior 
standing and consent of division head. 

309-2. INCOME TAXES FOR INDIVIDUALS. Preparation of income tax re- 
turns. Federal income tax law as applied to individuals. Not open to 
those concentrating in accounting. 

331-5. TAX ACCOUNTING. Study of accounting principles and procedures for 
meeting requirements of current laws and regulations which relate to 
federal income tax and social security taxes. Laboratory problems and 
preparation of tax returns with special emphasis on the individual tax- 
payer. Prerequisite: 253. 

341-3. COST ACCOUNTING. Departmental, job order, and process cost. Ac- 
cumulation of material and labor costs; factory overhead and its alloca- 
tion; cost reports to management — their preparation and use. Prereq- 
uisite: 253. 

351-4, 352-4, 353-4. ADVANCED ACCOUNTING I, II, III. Accounting prin- 
ciples and procedures for the preparation of adequate financial state- 
ments. Special attention given depreciation, appraisals, investments, in- 
tangibles, installment sales, consignments, branch accounts, sinking 
funds, annuities, leaseholds, and bonds. Preparation and use of special 
statements, application of funds, statement of affairs, and consolidated 
statements. Prerequisite: 253. 

355-3. GOVERNMENTAL ACCOUNTING. Budget and operating fund ac- 
counts, with emphasis on accounting control as a means of improving 
administration of public enterprises. Prerequisite: 253. 

356-5. AUDITING. Procedures and practices of public accountants in verifying 
accounts and supplementary data; training in preparation and analysis 
of reports. Prerequisite: 353 or consent of instructor. 

432-4. PROBLEMS IN FEDERAL TAXATION. Study of income tax problems 
which arise from partnership, corporation, estate, and trust type of or- 
ganization. Brief study of federal estate and gift taxes. Student does re- 
search in source materials in arriving at solutions of complicated tax 
problems. Prerequisite: 331. 

442-4. ADVANCED COST ACCOUNTING. Standard costs and distribution 
costs. Special problems in cost accounting, including joint product, by- 
product, and capacity costs. Prerequisite: 341. 

458-4. ACCOUNTING SYSTEMS. Problems in accounting systems design and 
installation. Examination of existing systems and practice in system de- 
sign. Prerequisite: 341 and 353. 

459-4. INTERNSHIP IN ACCOUNTING. Supervised work experience in pro- 
fessional accounting. Prerequisite: outstanding record in accounting and 
recommendation of the committee on internship. 

461-4. C.P.A. AND ADVANCED ACCOUNTING PROBLEMS. A problems 
course, using problems from the examinations sponsored by the Ameri- 
can Institute of Certified Public Accountants and given in the last few 
years. Some problems also drawn from other sources. Prerequisite: 341 
and 353. 



ECONOMICS 15 



ECONOMICS 

Courses in economics will help students understand the principles con- 
cerning the production and distribution of goods and services. Important 
but controversial issues, such as depression, inflation, labor unions and 
business monopoly, tariffs, and government spending, are discussed and 
analyzed. 

Training in economics will prepare an individual for a position in 
private industry, government service, or teaching. Business and govern- 
mental agencies employ economists in management training programs, re- 
search, and administrative positions. Economics also provides an excellent 
background needed for the individual's understanding and evaluation of 
economic policy of government. 

Students interested in economics, as a field of concentration, may 
pursue a somewhat specialized study in such fields as money and banking, 
industrial relations, finance, and international trade. The over-all sequence 
of courses, including those in related areas such as business, education, 
psychology, mathematics, and government, should be planned in co-opera- 
tion with an adviser in the Business Division. 



SUGGESTED CURRICULA 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 

General Studies Requirements (See page 7. Waive GSB 151, 152, 

153.) 87 

Business Division Requirements (See page 12.) 26 

Economics Concentration Requirements 64 

Economics 307, 310, 315, 317, 328, 330, 418, 440, 450, 451, 
470, 481 43 

Management 320, 340, 371, 380, 473 21 

Electives - 15 

Total 192 



BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

For a degree in the Social Sciences Division, the following courses 
constitute a concentration in economics: 205, 1 206, 1 307, 310, 315, 317, 
328, 330, 418, 440, 450, 470, 481; Accounting 251; Mathematics 111. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION DEGREE 

For this degree in the Education Division, the following courses consti- 



16 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

tute a 48-hour concentration in economics: 205, 1 206, 1 307, 310, 315, 317, 
328 or 330, 418, 440 or 450 or 451 or 470, 460 or 481; Accounting 251; 
Marketing 230. These constitute a 36-hour concentration in economics: 
205, 1 206, 1 307, 315, 317, 310 or 328 or 330, 418, 460 or 470 or 481, and 
one elective. 

SECONDARY CONCENTRATION 

Courses constituting a secondary concentration in economics are 205, 1 
206, 1 307, 315, 317, 310 or 328 or 330; Accounting 251. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

205-5. SURVEY OF ECONOMIC PRINCIPLES. 

206-4. ECONOMIC PRINCIPLES AND PROBLEMS. Prerequisite: 205. 1 

301-1 to 6. ECONOMIC READINGS. Reading in books and periodicals in a 
defined field, under direction of one or more staff members. Periodic 
written and oral reports. Prerequisite: consent of division head. 

307-4. ECONOMIC AND BUSINESS STATISTICS I. Prerequisite: 205; recom- 
mended, GSD 157. 

310-4. LABOR PROBLEMS. Prerequisite: 206, 1 or 205 * and consent of instruc- 
tor. 

315-4. MONEY AND BANKING I. Prerequisite: 205/ 

317-4. ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES. Prerequisite: 205. 1 

328-4. INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS I. Prerequisite: 206, 1 or 205 1 and 
consent of instructor. 

330-4. PUBLIC FINANCE I: NATIONAL. Prerequisite: 206, 1 or 205 * and 
consent of instructor. 

408-4. ECONOMIC AND BUSINESS STATISTICS II. 3 hours lecture; 2 hours 
laboratory. Prerequisite: 307 or consent of instructor. 

411-4. COLLECTIVE BARGAINING AND DISPUTE SETTLEMENT. Na- 
ture, issues, procedures, economic effects. Analysis of actual collective 
bargaining situations. Prerequisite: 310 or consent of instructor. 

416-4. MONEY AND BANKING II. Emphasis upon the Federal Reserve and 
other banking systems. Prerequisite: 315 or consent of instructor. 

418-4. ECONOMIC HISTORY OF EUROPE. A survey of the economic growth 
of Europe with emphasis upon the development of European agriculture, 
industry, finance, and international trade since 1750. Prerequisite: 205, 1 
206, 1 or consent of instructor. 

432-3. FISCAL POLICY OF THE UNITED STATES. Countercyclical, secular, 
and emergency use of government expenditures, debt, taxes. Prerequisite: 
205, 1 206, 1 or consent of instructor. 

436-3. GOVERNMENT AND LABOR. A study of labor relations and legisla- 
tion considering both constitutional and economic aspects. Prerequisite: 
205 *; Government 210 1 or consent of instructor. 

440-3. INTERMEDIATE THEORY. A more intensive treatment of price and 
income theory. Prerequisite: 206, 1 or 205 1 and consent of instructor. 

450-3. HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT. Great economists and the de- 



ECONOMICS 17 

velopment of economic theory. Prerequisite: 205, 1 and 206 * or consent 
of instructor. 

451-3. ECONOMIC THEORIES. A study of the theories of the recent leading 
economists. Prerequisite: 450 or consent of instructor. 

460-4. RUSSIAN ECONOMY. A study of the development of Russian trade, 
agriculture, industry, government, finance, and standards of living in 
successive periods in relation to the historical, geographic, economic, and 
ideological background. Prerequisite: 205 1 or consent of instructor. 

470-3. BUSINESS CYCLES. Major business fluctuations in the United States- 
prices, employment, production, credit, inflation and deflation, and gov- 
ernment action during the cycles. Prerequisite: 315 or consent of in- 
structor. 

481-3. COMPARATIVE ECONOMIC SYSTEMS. Capitalism, socialism, fas- 
cism, and other forms of the economy. Prerequisite: 205 1 or consent of 
instructor. 

490-4. WORKSHOP IN ECONOMIC EDUCATION. (Same as Secondary Ed- 
ucation 490.) Designed to assist elementary and secondary school teach- 
ers in promoting economic understanding through the translation of eco- 
nomic principles and problems into classroom teaching materials. 

1 Or the General Studies equivalents. 



MANAGEMENT 

Courses are offered in these areas of management: general business, 
finance, and personnel management. Students who do not wish to specialize 
will select the first area. The latter two areas are more restrictive in their 
requirements. The objective is to provide a broad, general, liberal educa- 
tional experience rather than a narrow professional training. 

SUGGESTED CURRICULUM 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 

General Studies Requirements (See page 7. Waive GSB 151, 152, 

153.) 87 

Business Division Requirements (See page 12.) 26 

Management Concentration Requirements 70 

Economics 307, 310, 315, 317-4 or 470-3 15 

Management 170, 271, 320, 361, 371, 372 or 373, 385 28 

One of three specializations: 1, General Business; 2, Fi- 
nance; 3, Personnel Management 27 

1. Management 327, 340, 380, 421, 473, 479-4 24 
Marketing 334, 341, 438 (any one) 4 

2. Management 323, 327, 328, 340 or 380, 421, 475 23 
Marketing 334, 341, 438 (any one) 4 



18 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

3. Management 340, 380, 382-3 or Economics 411-4, 

480, 481, 485 23 
Psychology 201 4 
Electives 9 

Total 192 



SECONDARY CONCENTRATION 

Requirements for a 24-hour concentration in management with a 
specialization in finance include 170, 320, 323, 327, 340; Accounting 251. 

Requirements for a 24-hour concentration in management with a 
specialization in general business include 170, 320, 340, 371; Accounting 
251; Marketing 230. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

170-4. INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION. A survey of 
business, intended to give to the student a general knowledge of the 
modern business world, a better basis for choosing his specialty, and 
certain information not covered in the various specialized courses offered. 

240-4. INTRODUCTION TO DATA PROCESSING. Development of the con- 
cept of an organization; problems of co-ordination and control; feed- 
back loop; management by exception. Study covers machine functions, 
procedure planning, flow charting and integrated data processing; also, 
the stored program concept, input-output methods and problems in- 
volved with electronic data processing equipment. Prerequisite: Sopho- 
more standing. 

241-4. PRINCIPLES OF PROGRAMMING FOR ELECTRONIC DATA 
PROCESSING. Comparative study of stored program concepts, binary 
coding principles, study of machine language and symbolic coding; def- 
inition of problem and preparation of flow charts and block diagrams; 
symbolic programming system; timing sequences for input-output func- 
tions. Laboratory work involves practice problems requiring the prepara- 
tion of flow charts, block diagrams, coding and preparation of source, 
program, and test running on IBM 1401 equipment. Three hours lec- 
ture; two hours laboratory. Prerequisite: 240-4, or equivalent, or con- 
sent of instructor. 

271-4. BUSINESS WRITING. Principles and practice in writing typical kinds 
of business correspondence and reports. Prerequisite: GSD 152. 

301-1 to 6. MANAGEMENT READINGS. Reading in books and periodicals in 
a defined field, under direction of one or more staff members. Periodic 
written and oral reports. Prerequisite: consent of division head. 

320-5. CORPORATION FINANCE. Financial structure in industry, sources of 
capital, regulation of securities, stock exchanges, and the Security and 
Exchange Commission; dividend and other financial policies. Interpret- 
ing corporation reports and evaluating securities through the analysis 
of financial statements. Prerequisites: Accounting 253, Economics 205. 1 



MANAGEMENT 19 

323-4. INVESTMENTS. Survey of the problems and procedures of investment 
management; types of investment risks; security analysis; investment 
problems of the individual as well as the corporation. Prerequisite: 320. 

327-4. GENERAL INSURANCE. Underlying principles and functions of in- 
surance in the economic life of the individual and of business. Prereq- 
uisites: Accounting 253, Economics 206. 1 

328-3. REAL ESTATE. Purchasing, financing, owning, developing, improving, 
assessing, maintaining, zoning, subdividing, conveying, managing, op- 
erating in a real estate business; the influence of recent court decisions 
on real estate. 

340-4. BUSINESS ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT. Theory and 
practice. Prerequisite: junior standing or consent of instructor. 

361-3. BUSINESS REPORT WRITING. Discussion, illustration, and practical 
application of report writing techniques, including study of uses, forms, 
and structures of different types of reports. 

371-4. BUSINESS LAW I. Introduction to law, contract law, and agency law. 

372-4. BUSINESS LAW II. Real property law, personal property law, partner- 
ship law, and corporation law. 

373_4. BUSINESS LAW III. Negotiable instrument law, sales law, suretyship 
law, and insurance law. 

380-4. PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT. Plant location, design, and con- 
struction; internal organization for operations, production control, stores 
control, routing of materials, job analysis, and time study; wage sys- 
tems, subdivision of executive responsibilities and duties; methods of co- 
ordination and planning. Prerequisite: Economics 206. 1 

382-3. TIME AND MOTION STUDY. Principles and methods for simplifying 
work and establishing sound time-allowances for performance. 

385-4. PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT. Relation of the human element to pro- 
duction; the art of securing understanding and co-operation; employee 
organizations and outside activities; work of the personnel department; 
wage standards and working conditions. Prerequisite: Economics 206. 1 

421-4. MANAGEMENT OF BUSINESS FINANCE. The principal problems of 
managing the financial operations of an enterprise with emphasis upon 
analysis and solutions of problems pertaining to policy decisions. The 
scope includes both short-term working capital and long-term financing. 
Prerequisite: 320. 

442-4. MANAGEMENT OF DATA PROCESSING SYSTEMS. A systematic 
examination of the principles and practices of data processing manage- 
ment. Includes installation layout, employment requirements, machine 
utilization, scheduling, work loads, interdepartmental relations, legal 
considerations, etc Prerequisite: 241. 

472-4. SMALL BUSINESS. The position of small business in our national 
economy, including the organization, financing, location, personnel poli- 
cies, merchandising practices, records, government regulation, and taxes. 

473-4. BUSINESS ENTERPRISE AND PUBLIC POLICY. Some of the major 
problems of social control of business arising out of the operation of 
business in modern society; covering types of control, necessity and effects 
of control. Prerequisite: senior standing. 

475-4. BUDGETING AND SYSTEMS. Budgeting and systems as aids in co- 
ordinating and directing business operation. Prerequisites: 320, Ac- 
counting 253. 



20 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

479-2 to 8. PROBLEMS IN BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS. Application of 
economic theory to practical business problems. Open to those concen- 
trating in business administration or economics with senior standing. 

480-4. SEMINAR IN LABOR LAW. An analysis of the constitutional aspects 
and recent cases that have arisen interpreting the Taft-Hartley Act, Fair 
Labor Standards Act, Fair Employment Practice Laws, and "right-to- 
work" laws. Prerequisite: two quarters of business law or Economics 310. 

481-4. ADMINISTRATIVE MANAGEMENT. An intensive study of the prin- 
ciples of management and their application to the current industrial 
setting. Lecture and case methods are used. Prerequisite: 340. 

483-4. ADVANCED PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT. Internal problems of 
managerial control of production including recent developments in the- 
ory and techniques; case material utilized for the development of ana- 
lytical ability. Prerequisite: 380. 

485-4. PROBLEMS IN PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT. Analysis of problems 
in personnel administration arising from current developments in organ- 
ization and techniques; case problems and special reports. Prerequisite: 
385. 

1 Or the General Studies equivalents 



MARKETING 

Marketing, which includes all activities concerned with determining 
and satisfying consumer desires, is rapidly becoming a major function in 
the business process. From the initial determination of consumer desires 
through the medium of market research to the final step of putting products 
into the consumer's hands through personal salesmanship, marketing 
knowledge and techniques provide the tools for developing and distributing 
goods and services in the dynamic economy of today and the future. 

The area of marketing offers a variety of courses that prepare the 
future marketer for his role in American business. Undergraduate courses 
are offered in areas such as sales, advertising, marketing management, 
transportation, retailing, wholesaling, and market research. Additional 
senior-level or graduate courses are offered to prepare the student for more 
specialized positions in marketing management. 

SUGGESTED CURRICULUM 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 

General Studies Requirements (See page 7. Waive GSB 151, 152, 

153.) 87 

Business Division Requirements (See page 12.) 26 

Marketing Concentration Requirements 68 

Economics 307, 315, 317-4 or 470-3 11 



MARKETING 21 

Management 170, 320, 340, 361, 371, 373 24 
Marketing (230 is also a divisional requirement) (5) 
Marketing 331, 333, 334, 336, 337, 341, 349-3 or 384-4 26 
Marketing 332-4, 438-4, 451-4, 463-3 (any two) 7 
Electives 11 

Total . 192 

SECONDARY CONCENTRATION 

Requirements for a 24-hour concentration in marketing include 230, 
333, 337, and one of the four following options: 
General Marketing: 331 or 332, 341, and Accounting 251. 
Sales and Advertising: 384, 438, and 463. 
Retailing: 331, 332, and 334. 
Industrial Marketing: 334, 336, 341, and 349. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

230-5. PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING. A general survey course to acquaint 
the student with the entire field of marketing. Consideration is given to 
the underlying economic principles; historical development of distributive 
systems, channels, agents, institutions, functions, policies, and principles. 
Prerequisite: Economics 205 or the General Studies equivalent or consent 
of instructor. 

301-1 to 6. MARKETING READINGS. Readings in books and periodicals in a 
denned field, under the direction of one or more staff members. Periodic 
written and oral reports. Prerequisite: consent of division head. 

331-4. RETAILING. Principles underlying the evolution, organization, and op- 
eration of retailing, including techniques used and opportunities offered 
in this field. 

332-4. STORE MANAGEMENT. Store management; organization, location; 
layout. Procedures in receiving goods, handling sales; packing; wrapping; 
customer complaints; telephone orders, etc. Prerequisite: 331. 

333-4. PRINCIPLES OF ADVERTISING. Advertising fundamentals in relation 
to modern business activities; fields of advertising; advertising media, 
campaigns, and systems. Prerequisite: 230. 

334-4. CREDITS AND COLLECTIONS. Organization and operation of the 
credit department, including the sources and analysis of credit informa- 
tion, collection methods, and correspondence. Retail credit management 
emphasized. Prerequisite: 230. 

336-3. PURCHASING. Dealer-supplier relationship, in manufacturing, whole- 
saling, and retailing. Purchasing for resale and for consumption. Influ- 
ence in sales promotion materials. Buying from single and multiple sup- 
pliers. Prerequisite: 230. 

337-4. PRINCIPLES OF SALESMANSHIP. History, scope, and importance of 
selling in modern business; the sales department; the salesman's part in 
the selling process. Prerequisite: 230. 



22 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

341-4. TRANSPORTATION. Evolution of American transportation systems, 
and of the current problems of transportation facilities in connection with 
governmental control and regulation. Prerequisite: 230. 

349-3. WHOLESALING. Evolution, economic status, and management of non- 
retail marketing. Position of wholesaling in distribution. Kinds of whole- 
saling; types of middlemen; internal organization and operation of whole- 
salers; trading areas. Analyze relationship between marketing policies of 
wholesaler and manufacturer and changing patterns of wholesale dis- 
tribution. Prerequisite: 230. 

384-4. ADVERTISING MEDIA ANALYSIS. A study of the businessman's prob- 
lems of selecting appropriate advertising media for the particular adver- 
tising mix that affords him the best strategy. Prerequisite: 333. 

438-4. SALES MANAGEMENT. Developing and training a sales force. The dif- 
ferent types of sales forces. Managing sales functions: determining sales- 
man's territories, quotas, compensation. Budget preparation. Developing 
and implementing the merchandise plan. Prerequisites: 230, and 337 or 
consent of the instructor. 

451-4. TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT. Primary industrial traffic management 
functions, including determination of rates, classification, routing, and 
proper documentation. Consideration given to loss and damage claims, 
terminal charges, demurrage, reconsignment and conversion, transit privi- 
leges, warehousing, and packing. Emphasis upon co-operative aspects of 
traffic management requiring transportation. Prerequisite: 341. 

463-3. ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT. The effective way of advertising by 
business management. An understanding of what advertising can be ex- 
pected to accomplish under different sets of marketing factors and prod- 
ucts. The selection of advantageous advertising programs under different 
marketing mixes. Prerequisite: 333 or 384. 

490-4. MARKETING RESEARCH AND ANALYSIS. A non-mathematical de- 
velopment of the basic precedures, methods, and theory underlying anal- 
ysis of primary and secondary market data. Prerequisite: 230, and one 
quarter of basic statistics or its equivalent. 



SECRETARIAL AND BUSINESS EDUCATION 

Two concentrations are offered in secretarial and business education: 
(1) business-teacher education for students preparing to teach business 
subjects in high school, and (2) secretarial and office management. 

The business-teacher education program, leading to the Bachelor of 
Science in Education degree in the Education Division, is divided into three 
sequences: (a) preparation for teaching all high school business subjects, 
(b) preparation for teaching all high school business subjects except short- 
hand, and (c) preparation for teaching basic business subjects only. 

The secretarial and office-management program, leading to the Bache- 
lor of Science degree in the Business Division, offers a course of study in 
office skills for a typist, stenographer, secretary, or machine operator, with 
training in office management and supervision. 



SECRETARIAL AND BUSINESS EDUCATION 23 



SUGGESTED CURRICULA 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE 

General Studies Requirements (See page 7. Waive GSB 151, 152, 

153.) 87 

Business Division Requirements (See page 12.) 26 

Business and Secretarial Education Concentration Requirements 62-87 

Secretarial and Business Education 102, 103, 104, 105, 

106, 107, 113,213,216,308 8-33 

Secretarial and Business Education 307, 313, 407 12 

Economics 307 4 

Management 170, 271, 320, 340, 361, 371, 372 or 373, 385 32 
Marketing (any two courses, in addition to 230) 6 

Electives 0-17 

Total 192-200 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION DEGREE 

Candidates for this degree in the Education Division who are prepar- 
ing to teach all high school business subjects must satisfy the requirements 
of the Business Division as well as the following Secretarial and Business 
Education Concentration Requirements, which total 37 to 64 hours. 
Secretarial and Business Education 1 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 

213, 216, 307 or 407, 308, 313 13-40 

Secretarial and Business Education 403, 404, 405, 406, 408 (any 

two) 6-8 

Management 170, 271, 371, 372 or 373 16 

Students preparing to teach the business subjects usually taught in 
high school except shorthand, transcription, and secretarial practice must 
satisfy the requirements of the Business Division as well as the following 
Secretarial and Business Education Concentration Requirements, which 
total 44-56 hours: 

Accounting 351 4 

Secretarial and Business Education ] 102, 103, 104, 213, 313, 407 .. 11-20 
Secretarial and Business Education 403, 405, 406, 408 (any two) 6-8 

Management 170, 271, 371, 372 or 373, and one elective 20 

Marketing (one elective) 3-4 

Students preparing to teach only the basic business subjects in high 
school must satisfy the requirements of the Business Division as well as 

1 Students who have had work in this area will be placed at the level for which their 
ability qualifies them. 



24 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

the following Secretarial and Business Education Concentration Require- 
ments, which total 52-53 hours: 

Accounting 351 4 

Secretarial and Business Education 405, 408 6 

Secretarial and Business Education or Management, electives 16 

Economics 355 3 

Management 170, 271, 371, 372, 373 20 

Marketing (one elective) 3-4 

SECONDARY CONCENTRATION 

Students desiring less intensive concentrations in business-teacher edu- 
cation or in secretarial training and office management should plan their 
programs in consultation with representatives of the Business Division. It 
is necessary to plan each student's program individually because of varying 
backgrounds and needs. The following illustrative programs, however, will 
fit the needs of many students. 

BUSINESS-TEACHER EDUCATION 

Preparation for teaching bookkeeping, calculating machines, and gen- 
eral business: 313, 405, and 408; Accounting 251, 252, 253; Management 
170, 371. Total: 30 hours. 

Preparation for teaching typewriting and general business, for students 
without previous training in typewriting: 102, 103, 104, 213, 403, 405; 
Management 170, 271, 371. Total: 30 hours. 

Preparation for teaching typewriting and shorthand, for students 
without previous training in typewriting and shorthand: 102, 103, 104, 105, 
106, 107, 213, 216, 308, 403, 404. Total: 38 hours. 

Preparation for teaching typewriting, shorthand, office practice, and 
office machines, for students with two years of previous training in type- 
writing and one year of previous training in shorthand: 107, 213, 216, 307, 
308, 313, 403, 404. Total: 29 hours. 

Preparation for teaching typewriting, shorthand, and secretarial prac- 
tice, for students with two years of previous training in both typewriting 
and shorthand, and who can take sustained, new-matter dictation at 80 
words per minute: 213, 216, 307 or 407, 308, 313, 403, 404; Management 
271. Total: 29 hours. 

Preparation for teaching typewriting, shorthand, and secretarial prac- 
tice, for students with two years of previous training in both typewriting 
and shorthand, and who can take sustained, new-matter dictation at 100 
words per minute: 213, 307, 308, 313, 403, 404, 407; Management 271. 
Total: 29 hours. 

Preparation for teaching typewriting, shorthand, bookkeeping, and gen- 



SECRETARIAL AND BUSINESS EDUCATION 25 

eral business, for students with two years of previous training in both type- 
writing and shorthand, and who can take sustained, new-matter dictation 
at 100 words per minute: 213, 308, 403 or 404, 405 or 408; Accounting 251, 
252, 253; Management 170, 371. Total: 33 hours. 

SECRETARIAL TRAINING AND OFFICE MANAGEMENT 

For students with no previous training in typewriting or shorthand: 
102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 213, 216, 308. Total: 32 hours. 

For students with one year of previous training in both typewriting 
and shorthand: 104, 107, 213, 216, 307, 308, 313. Total: 26 hours. 

For students with two years of previous training in both typewriting 
and shorthand who can take sustained, new-matter dictation at 80 words 
per minute: 213, 216, 307, 308, 313, 407; Management 271. Total: 27 hours. 

For students with two years of previous training in both typewriting 
and shorthand who can take sustained, new-matter dictation at 100 words 
per minute: 213, 307, 308, 407; Management 271, 361. Total: 26 hours. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

102-3. TYPEWRITING I. An introductory course in touch typewriting aimed 
at developing a typing rate of at least 30 words per minute. Includes 
simple business correspondence, tables, and manuscripts. Noncredit for 
those who have had previous formal training in typewriting. 

103-3. TYPEWRITING II. Emphasis on skill development, on business cor- 
respondence, and on other vocational and personal applications of typ- 
ing skill. Prerequisite: 102, or one semester of high school typing and 
the ability to type at least 30 words per minute and to prepare simple 
business correspondence. 

104-3. TYPEWRITING III. Further skill development, with emphasis on more 
complicated vocational and personal applications of typing skill. Prereq- 
uisite: 103, or one year of high school typing and the ability to type at 
least 35 words per minute and to type business correspondence, tables, 
etc. of moderate difficulty. 

105-4. SHORTHAND I. An introductory course in Gregg shorthand. May not 
be taken for credit by students who have had previous high school or 
other formal training in shorthand. 

106-4. SHORTHAND II. Completion of shorthand theory and introduction 
to dictation and transcription. Prerequisite: 105, or approximately one 
semester of shorthand instruction in high school, or equivalent. 

107-4. SHORTHAND III. Major emphasis on improving dictation and tran- 
scription skills. Prerequisite: 106, or one year of high school instruction 
in shorthand (or equivalent) and the ability to take sustained, new- 
matter dictation at 60 words per minute for three minutes. 

113-1. DUPLICATING . Skills and knowledges in (1) the preparation of mas- 
ter copies and stencils and (2) the operation of liquid and stencil du- 
plicating machines. Prerequisite: 102 or equivalent. 

213-3. TYPEWRITING IV. Development of advanced skills in typing straight 
copy, business correspondence, manuscripts, forms, and tables; prepara- 



26 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

tion of copy from rough draft materials; typing master copies for du- 
plicating machines; transcription from machine dictation. Prerequisite: 
104 or \ l / 2 to 2 years of high school typing and the ability to type at 
least 45 words per minute and to prepare business correspondence, tables, 
manuscripts, forms, etc. 

216-4. SHORTHAND IV. Development of high-level dictation and transcrip- 
tion skills and knowledges. Prerequisites: 107, or l ! / 2 to 2 years of pre- 
vious high school training in shorthand and transcription (or equiva- 
lent) and the ability to transcribe on the typewriter sustained, new- 
matter dictation taken at 70 words per minute. 

307-4. SECRETARIAL PRACTICE. An advanced course for secretaries, cover- 
ing such topics as personality and human relationships, office mail, of- 
fice equipment, travel, sources of information, communications, business 
reports, and filing. Prerequisites: 213 and 216. 

308-4. SHORTHAND V. Development of advanced dictation and transcription 
competencies. Prerequisite: 216, or two years of previous high school 
training in shorthand and transcription (or equivalent) and the ability 
to transcribe on the typewriter sustained, new-matter dictation taken at 
80 words per minute. 

313-4. CALCULATING MACHINES. Operation of basic types of office cal- 
culating machines, emphasizing the characteristic uses of each kind of 
machine in the office. Laboratory practice required. 

403-3. TEACHING TYPEWRITING. Conduct of instruction in typewriting; 
the programming of activities in typewriting training, methods of in- 
struction, skill-building principles and techniques, selection and prepara- 
tion of practice materials, standards of achievement, and evaluation of 
pupils progress. Prerequisite: 213 or equivalent. 

404-3. TEACHING SHORTHAND AND TRANSCRIPTION. Conduct of in- 
struction in shorthand and transcription: the programming of activities 
in shorthand and transcription training, methods of instruction, skill- 
building principles and techniques, selection and preparation of practice 
and homework materials, standards of achievement, and evaluation of 
pupil progress. Prerequisite: 308 or equivalent. 

405-3. TEACHING BASIC BUSINESS SUBJECTS. Instructional methods and 
materials for, and the evaluation of pupil progress in, such basic busi- 
ness subjects as general business, consumer education, economic geog- 
raphy, and business law. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

406-4. TEACHING CLERICAL PRACTICE AND OFFICE MACHINES. In- 
structional methods and materials for, and the evaluation of pupil 
progress in, clerical practice and office machines. Prerequisites: 213, 313 
or equivalent. 

407-4. OFFICE MANAGEMENT. A study of the principles of management as 
applied to office problems. Emphasis on the role of the office in business 
management; office organization; physical facilities of the office; office 
services, procedures, standards, and controls; records management; and 
office automation, including integrated data processing. Prerequisite: 
consent of instructor. 

408-3. TEACHING BOOKKEEPING AND ACCOUNTING. Instructional 
methods and materials for, and the evaluation of pupil progress in, 
bookkeeping and accounting. Attention also given to the teaching of busi- 
ness arithmetic. Prerequisite: Accounting 253 or equivalent. 



Education Division 



Education Administration; Elementary Education; Guidance; 
Health Education; Instructional Materials; Nursing; Physical 
Education for Men; Physical Education for Women; Psychology; 
Secondary Education; Special Education; Student Teaching 

The Education Division prepares teachers for all grades from kindergarten 
through high school and provides basic training in the fields of psychology 
and guidance. The division is committed to giving professional training to 
teachers, supervisors, administrators, and specialists. For most undergraduate 
students preparing to teach in high school, the subject-matter concentration 
will be taken in other divisions, and the provisional preparation for teach- 
ing, including student teaching, will be taken in the Education Division. 

Professor H. Bruce Brubaker, Ed.D. (Indiana) 1959 

Professor Alfred E. Kuenzli, Ed.D. (Indiana) 1958 

Professor Cameron W. Meredith, Ph.D. (Michigan) 1959 

Professor Glen R. Rasmussen, Ph.D. (Michigan) 1962 

Professor Harry H. Smith, Ed.D. (Washington University) 1958 

Professor Daniel W. Soper, Ph.D. (Syracuse) 1962 

Professor Clarence W. Stephens, Ed.D. (Indiana) 1952 

Professor Mark M. Tucker, Ed.D. (California, Los Angeles) 1959 

Professor Leonard B. Wheat, Ph.D. (Columbia) 1958 
Associate Professor David E. Bear, Ed.D. (Washington University) 1957 
Associate Professor Howard V. Davis, 

Ed.D. (Washington University) 1957 

Associate Professor Charles V. Matthews, M.A. (Kansas City) 1962 

Associate Professor John H. Schnabel, Ed.D. (Indiana) 1957 

Associate Professor Myllan Smyers, Ed.D. (Indiana) 1959 

Associate Professor Howard D. Southwood, Ed.D. (Florida) 1962 

Associate Professor Lawrence E. Taliana, Ph.D. (Purdue) 1957 

27 



28 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

Assistant Professor Rosemarie Archangel, M.A. (Iowa) 1961 

Assistant Professor William F. Banaghan, Ph.D. (Purdue) 1959 

Assistant Professor Gordon C. Bliss, Ed.D. (Nebraska) 1960 

Assistant Professor Regan Carpenter, Ed.D. (Colorado) 1959 

Assistant Professor Lawrence E. Dameron, Ph.D. (Chicago) 1960 

Assistant Professor Orval Gust Johnson, Ph.D. (Wisconsin) 1961 

Assistant Professor Walter C. Klein, H.S.D. (Indiana) 1961 

Assistant Professor Babette Marks, M.Ed. (North Carolina) 1957 

Assistant Professor Richard D. Spear, H.S.D. (Indiana) 1960 

Assistant Professor Roy S. Steinbrook, Ed.D. (Indiana) 1960 

Assistant Professor Robert H. Steinkellner, Ed.D. (Missouri) 1958 

Assistant Professor Raymond Edwin Troyer, Ph.D. (Chicago) 1960 

Instructor Thomas D. Evans, M.S. in Ed. (Southern Illinois) 1957 

Instructor Russell J. Hatheway, M.S. in Ed. (Southern Illinois) 1962 

Instructor Betty Jo Kelley, M.S. in Ed. (Southern Illinois) 1959 

Instructor Larry Neil Moehn, M.S. (Indiana) 1962 

Instructor Robert M. Reed, M.A. (Iowa State) 1962 

Instructor Norman E. Showers, M.S. (Southern California) 1957 

Instructor David R. Van Horn, M.S. (Oklahoma State) 1957 
Instructor Guanaviere M. Wheeler, 

M.S. in Ed. (Southern Illinois) 1961-62 



Visiting Professor Charles A. Lee, Ed.D. (Columbia) 1961-63 

Visiting Professor John G. Rockwell, Ph.D. (Chicago) 1959-63 

Lecturer Alfred D. Curry, M.Ed. (Missouri) 1960 

Lecturer Frank L. Eversull, Ph.D. (Yale) 1957-63 

Lecturer Loren B. Jung, M.S. in Ed. (Southern Illinois) 1961 

Lecturer Osborne E. Parker, M.S. in Ed. (Indiana) 1962 

Lecturer Elmer H. Wagner, M.M. (Indiana) 1962 



DIVISIONAL REQUIREMENTS 

All candidates for the Bachelor of Science in Education degree, except 
those concentrating in psychology, must take the following courses, which 
carry 19 hours of credit, and must successfully complete a student teaching 
assignment of 8-16 hours: Administration 331, 355, Guidance 305, 422, 
and Instructional Materials 417. 



ADMINISTRATION 

This area of study includes introductory courses and basic offerings in 



EDUCATION— ADMINISTRATION 29 

administration, supervision, and curriculum as well as in the social and 
philosophical foundations of education and advanced courses and seminars 
in these areas. The emphasis is mainly on graduate work toward the mas- 
ter's degree. 

Persons desirous of pursuing such programs should familiarize them- 
selves with the requirements as set forth in the Graduate School bulletin. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

331-3. THE AMERICAN EDUCATIONAL SYSTEMS. A comprehensive study 
of the structure, financing, and administration of American public school 
systems, made from the teacher's point of view. 

355-4. PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION. The philosophical principles of edu- 
cation and the educational theories and agencies involved in the work of 
the schools. 

420-4. LEGAL BASIS OF AMERICAN EDUCATION. Legal concepts govern- 
ing education in the United States. Particular emphasis is placed on 
common-law principles. 

424-4. SCHOOL ADMINISTRATION. Primarily for those who look forward 
to positions as supervisors, principals, or superintendents. 

431-4. HISTORY OF EDUCATION IN THE UNITED STATES. A historical 
study of the problems of American education which have relevance to 
contemporary education. 

432-4. PUBLIC OPINION, PROPAGANDA, AND EDUCATION. Analysis 
and classification of propaganda; how public opinion is formed; current 
materials from the different channels of communication. 

456-4. SCHOOL SUPERVISION. The function of the principal or supervisor 
in the improvement of instruction. Some activities, methods, and devices 
for improving the effectiveness of teaching. 

460-4. CURRICULUM. Modern practices and procedures in curriculum devel- 
opment, with attention to the professional, social, economic, and other 
major factors in curriculum planning. 

485-4 to 9. WORKSHOP IN EDUCATIONAL UTILIZATION OF COM- 
MUNITY RESOURCES. (Same as Guidance 485.) Opportunity for 
teachers, supervisors, and administrators to acquire detailed knowledge 
of community area resources; produce teaching units, assemble files of 
resource materials. Visits to business and industries; specialists and con- 
sultants enrich the program. 



ELEMENTARY 

The Education Division offers undergraduate work leading to the 
Bachelor of Science in Education degree in elementary education. Comple- 
tion of the requirements for the degree qualifies one for the State Elemen- 
tary Certificate on either the early-childhood or the elementary level. 

A student in this curriculum must ( 1 ) meet all requirements pertaining 
to prerequisites to student teaching and should study the section in this 



30 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

bulletin which lists such requirements; (2) have at least 24 hours in each 
of these three fields: language arts, natural science, social science; and (3) 
satisfy the general requirements of the University and of the Education 
Division. 

Students interested in programs on the master's level should consult 
the Graduate School bulletin. 

REQUIREMENTS BASED UPON, OR IN ADDITION TO, 
STATE MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS 

Language Arts 24 hours 

General Studies Area D 151, 152, 153, English 300 or 391, 6 hours 

selected from General Studies Area C 251, 252, 253; plus hours 

to equal 24. 
Natural Science 24 hours 

General Studies Area A 151, 152, 153, 251, 252, 253; plus 6 hours. 
Social Science 24 hours 

General Studies Area B 151, 152, 153, 251, 252, plus 8 or 9 hours 

from History 201, 202 and Government 210 or the General Studies 

equivalents. 
Mathematics 9 hours 

General Studies Area D 155, 156, 157 
Fine and Applied Arts 18 hours 

General Studies Area C 153 or 154; Art 300; Music 200, 300; plus 

electives to equal 18. Students in early-childhood education should 

take three quarters of Music 040 or pass a piano proficiency test. 
Health Education and Physical Education ... 10 hours 

General Studies Area E 251, plus 3 hours in physical education 

activity; plus Physical Education 350. 
General Psychology 3 hours 

General Studies Area B 253 
Education 48 hours 

Administration 331, 355; Elementary 314, 337, 351-8; Guidance 

305, 422; Instructional Materials 417; plus approved electives to 

equal 48 hours. 

Students in early-childhood education should take Elementary 

313, 316, 350-12 in place of 314, 351. 

SUGGESTED CURRICULUM 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION DEGREE 

General Studies Requirements (See page 7. Waive GSC 151, 152.) 90 
Education Division Requirements (See page 28.) 19 



ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 31 

Elementary Education Concentration Requirements 74 

General Studies Area A 151, 152, 153, 251, 252, 253 (18) 
General Studies Area B 151, 152, 153, 251, 252, 253 (18) 

General Studies Area C 153 or 154, 251, 252, 253 (12) 

General Studies Area D 151, 152, 153, 155, 156, 157 (18) 

General Studies Area E 251 (3) 

Total General Studies credit which applies toward con- 
centration and certification requirements (69) 

Art 300 4 

Elementary Education, Group (1) or (2) below 29 

(1) For elementary certification: 

Elementary 314, 337, 351-8 16 

Approved Professional Electives* 13 

(2) For early-childhood certification: 

Elementary 313, 316, 337, 350-12 24 
Approved Professional Electives* 5 
English 300-4 or 391-3, and Language Arts electives 9 
Government 210, History 201, 202 (any two or the Gen- 
eral Studies equivalents) 8 
Music 200 and 300 6 
Fine and Applied Arts electives (For early-childhood 
certification, include 3 quarters in Music 040 or pass 
a piano proficiency test.) 5 
Natural Science electives 6 
Physical Education 350 and 3 hours in activity 7 
Electives 9 

Total 192 

* Approved professional electives: All elementary education courses, Instructional 
Materials 405 or Elementary 313, Psychology 301, Guidance 412, 420, 442, Special Educa- 
tion 200 or 414, 410, 412, 420, Speech (Correction) 428. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

203-3. UNDERSTANDING THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL CHILD. Con- 
cepts needed to understand the child in the elementary school situation. 
Two hours of lecture and two hours of observation. Prerequisite: Psy- 
chology 201. 

313-4. CHILDREN'S LITERATURE. Emphasizes types of literature, analysis 
of literary qualities, selection and presentation of literature for children. 
Not for students who have had English 213. Prerequisite: Guidance 305. 

314-4. ELEMENTARY SCHOOL METHODS. The fundamental principles of 
education, the interpretation of current educational theory and practice, 
the processes of teaching and learning involved in elementary education. 



32 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

Education 314 cannot be substituted for 315, nor 315 for 314. Prereq- 
uisite: Guidance 305. 

316-4. KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY METHODS AND CURRICULUM. 
Philosophy and principles underlying the teaching of four-to-eight-year- 
olds. Emphasis upon organization, equipment, materials and methods for 
promoting growth of young children. Prerequisite: Guidance 305. 

337-4. READING IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. The principles of read- 
ing, factors that condition reading, together with grade placement of 
aims and materials; diagnostic and remedial treatment. Prerequisite: 
314 or 315; Guidance 305. 

350D-8 to 12. KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY STUDENT TEACHING. 

350E-4 to 8. ADVANCED KINDERGARTEN-PRIMARY STUDENT TEACH- 
ING. Prerequisite: 350D. 

351D-8to 12. ELEMENTARY STUDENT TEACHING. 

351E-4to8. ADVANCED ELEMENTARY STUDENT TEACHING. Prereq- 
uisite: 351D. 

415-2 to 4. IMPROVEMENT OF INSTRUCTION IN ARITHMETIC IN THE 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. Items to be taught, the grade placement of 
content, newer instructional practices and materials in instruction, and 
means of evaluating achievement. Prerequisite: Mathematics 210 or 
consent of instructor. 

433-4. WORKSHOP IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION. Meets needs of in- 
service teachers in such areas as curriculum adjustment, remedial teach- 
ing, child development. 

435-4 to 8. WORKSHOP IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL FOREIGN LAN- 
GUAGE INSTRUCTION. (Same as Foreign Languages 435.) Designed 
to assist elementary school teachers in integrating foreign languages 
into their teaching program as well as to encourage high school teachers 
to introduce or supervise foreign languages or education. Prerequisite: 
basic language credit. 

437-4. PROBLEMS IN READING. Practices and trends in the teaching of 
reading; materials of instruction in reading, particularly remedial mate- 
rials; techniques and materials for prevention of reading difficulties; 
diagnosis and remediation of reading difficulties. Prerequisite: 337. 

441-4. TEACHING ELEMENTARY SCIENCE. A workshop course for teachers 
of elementary school science. 

442-4. MATERIALS AND METHODS IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL SCI- 
ENCE. Study of the content and the methods of elementary school sci- 
ence. 

465-4. SEMINAR IN PSYCHOLOGY OF ELEMENTARY SCHOOL SUB- 
JECTS. Psychological principles of learning applied to the mastery of 
materials used in elementary school subjects. Prerequisites: 314, Guid- 
ance 305. 



GUIDANCE 

No undergraduate concentration is offered in guidance. One who plans 
to take a master's degree in guidance should consult the Graduate School 
bulletin and include Guidance 305, 412, and 422 in his undergraduate 



GUIDANCE 33 

work. Guidance 305 and 422 are Education Division requirements for the 
Bachelor of Science in Education degree. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

305-4. EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY. Designed to help the prospective 
teacher understand human development, learning and adjustment, with 
special emphasis on individual differences, motivation, evaluation, and 
discipline in classroom situations. Prerequisite: Psychology 201. 

412-4. MENTAL HYGIENE. An integration of knowledge and principles con- 
cerning factors and conditions in the personal life that tend to facilitate 
or deter mental health. Prerequisite: 305. 

420-4. EDUCATIONAL STATISTICS. The statistics needed by teachers for 
classroom use, the reading of educational literature, and informal educa- 
tional research. Includes methods of describing group performance, meas- 
ures of reliability, and tests of significance. Prerequisite: 305. 

422-4. EDUCATIONAL MEASUREMENTS I. Study of the philosophy and 
techniques of measurement. Special attention to the construction and 
use of teacher-made tests. Prerequisite: 305. 

426-4. INDIVIDUAL INVENTORY. Principles and procedures for studying 
individual pupils and their problems, for guidance purposes. Emphasis 
on interview, observation, ratings, case study, and cumulative records. 
Prerequisites: 422, 442. 

442-4. BASIC PRINCIPLES OF GUIDANCE. Introductory course on student 
personnel services. Survey of philosophy, principles, and organization of 
guidance services. Prerequisite: 305. 

485-4 to 9. WORKSHOP IN EDUCATIONAL UTILIZATION OF COM- 
MUNITY RESOURCES. Opportunity for teachers, supervisors, and ad- 
ministrators to acquire detailed knowledge of community area resources; 
produce teaching units, assemble files of resource materials. Visits to 
businesses and industries; specialists and consultants enrich the program. 



HEALTH EDUCATION 

A secondary concentration in health education is 30 hours, including 
205, 300, 313S or 334S, 350 or 460, 471, GSE 251, Guidance 412 or Psy- 
chology 301. Additional courses may be taken in safety education, school 
health, and community health. 

Courses constituting a 30-hour concentration in health education, for 
a student whose primary concentration is in physical education, are 205, 300, 
313S, 334S, 471, GSE 251, Guidance 412 or Psychology 301. Additional 
courses may be taken in safety education and school health. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
205-4. INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH EDUCATION. Introduction to phi- 



34 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

losophy and history of health education. The function of the school, the 
health department, and voluntary agencies in a health education pro- 
gram. Prerequisite: GSE 251. 

300-3. COMMUNICABLE DISEASE. A study of the communicable diseases 
with emphasis on control and principles of prevention, and application 
of these principles to the individual and the community. Prerequisite: 
GSE 251. 

302S-4. DRIVER EDUCATION AND TRAINING. To prepare the college 
student for teaching driver education and training in the secondary 
school. Prerequisite: Illinois driver's license, GSE 251. 

313S-4. INTRODUCTION TO SAFETY EDUCATION. Prepares for safety 
education in the public schools. Concerns safety as a social problem, 
development of safety skills, accident causes, teacher liability, research 
in the field. Prerequisite: GSE 251. 

334S-4. FIRST AID. Red Cross first aid course with lectures, demonstrations, 
and practical applications. Red Cross Instructor's Certificate given. Pre- 
requisite: GSE 251. 

350-4. METHODS AND MATERIALS IN ELEMENTARY HEALTH EDU- 
CATION. Designed to show the prospective teacher fundamental proc- 
esses, techniques, and material aids involved in elementary school health 
teaching. Prerequisite: GSE 251. 

400-4. HEALTH APPRAISAL OF CHILDREN. The role of the teacher in the 
health appraisal of the school child, including school health examina- 
tions, use of health records, and emphasis on training for recognition of 
health deviations from normal common among school children. Prereq- 
uisite: GSE 251. 

415S-4. WORKSHOP IN DRIVER EDUCATION AND TRAFFIC SAFETY. 
For pre-service and in-service teachers. Individual and group problems 
are treated. Lectures by safety authorities, demonstrations, field trips, 
audio-visual materials, and individually supervised research in special 
problem areas. Prerequisite: 302S or equivalent. 

443S-4. METHODS AND MATERIALS IN DRIVER EDUCATION. An ad- 
vanced course in driver education which includes a study of existing 
courses of study, review of research, course-of-study planning, visitation 
and reporting, panel discussions, accident statistics, conducting the 
secondary school program, testing, and demonstration in the car. Prereq- 
uisite: 302S. 

460-4. METHODS AND MATERIALS IN SECONDARY SCHOOL HEALTH 
EDUCATION. Shows the prospective teacher the fundamental processes 
involved in the teaching of health education at the secondary level. 

471-4. ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF SCHOOL HEALTH. 
Appraisal of over-all school organization for health education, including 
health service and personnel, health and safety instruction, school en- 
vironment, school health examination, local, state, and federal resources 
for health, health councils, and interdepartmental relationships. 

480S-4. WORKSHOP IN SAFETY EDUCATION. Summer course for in-serv- 
ice teachers, nurses, administrators, advanced students, and others in- 
terested in safety education as it applies to the public school and the 
community. Individual problems, lectures, demonstrations, films, field 
trips, and individual group study in special areas of interest. Prereq- 
uisite: 313S or consent of instructor. 



INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS 35 



INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS 

The Education Division offers a secondary concentration in library 
science to qualify persons trained primarily as teachers for part-time pro- 
fessional service in a school library. 

The required courses are 201, 306, 308, 403, 405, 406, and 417 or 420. 
Total: 26 hours. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

201-2. THE INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS APPROACH TO LEARNING. 

An introductory course to the study of instructional materials. A survey 
of the history of libraries and audio-visual centers; the complete range 
of materials of teaching with their unique and common characteristics; 
the background of the school instructional materials program. 

306-4. SCHOOL LIBRARIES AS INFORMATION CENTERS. Evaluation, se- 
lection, and use of reference sources for elementary and secondary school 
libraries. Principles and methods of reference service. 

308-4. SCHOOL LIBRARY TECHNICAL PROCESSES. Organization of li- 
brary materials for effective service to readers. Acquisition, classification, 
cataloguing, preparation, preservation, and circulation of materials. Lab- 
oratory assignments. 

400-2. LIBRARY RESEARCH METHODS. Introduction to the use of library 
materials in graduate research. Includes a survey of scholarly publishing 
and the use of reference work in various subjects. 

403-4. SCHOOL LIBRARY FUNCTIONS AND MANAGEMENT. Effective 
library services in relation to the educational objectives of elementary 
and secondary school programs; organization, supervision, finance, hous- 
ing, equipment, standards, and evaluation. 

405-4. LIBRARY MATERIALS FOR CHILDREN. Study of the aids, methods, 
and criteria for the selection and use of books and other instructional 
materials for children in the elementary schools. Open to juniors with 
consent of instructor. 

406-4. LIBRARY MATERIALS FOR ADOLESCENTS. A study of the aids, 
methods, and criteria for the selection and use of books and other in- 
structional materials for students in the high school. Open to juniors 
with consent of instructor. 

417-4. AUDIO- VISUAL METHODS IN EDUCATION. Selection and utiliza- 
tion of audio-visual methods in the teaching situation, elementary 
through adult levels. Motion pictures, slides, filmstrips, and recordings 
particularly stressed. Prerequisite: Guidance 305. 

420-4. SCHOOL LIBRARY ACTIVITIES AND PRACTICE. Supervised prac- 
tice and observation integrated with instruction in the typical activities 
of school librarianship; storytelling, publicity, developing units of library 
instruction, and work with students. Prerequisites: 306, 308, 403, and 
405 or 406. 



36 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



NURSING 

The nursing program of the Edwardsville Campus is undergoing re- 
evaluation. Any further developments will be announced in later bulletins. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR MEN 

Courses leading to the Bachelor of Science in Education degree with 
a concentration in physical education are offered. 

Three hours of physical education are required for all bachelor's de- 
gree students under 30 years of age on the Edwardsville Campus as part of 
the University's general requirements. These courses, 251, 252, and 253, 
are activities of a group and individual nature. Special sections are provided 
for those using these courses to satisfy the general requirement. These 
courses should be completed in the freshman and sophomore years. 

SUGGESTED CURRICULUM 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION DEGREE 

General Studies Requirements (See page 7.) 96 

Education Division Requirements (See page 28.) 15 

(Physical Education 370 satisfies Education Division require- 
ment of Guidance 422.) 

Additional Professional Education Requirements 16 

Secondary Education 315, 352 16 

Physical Education Concentration Requirements 66 

General Studies Area E 251 (3) 

Health Education 460 4 

Physical Education for Men, Theory Courses: 101, 303, 

305, 341, 350, 354, 365, 370, 376, 381 or 382, 383, 384 37 
Physical Education for Men Practice Courses: 114, 116, 

117, 118, 119, 151, 152, 153, 261, 262, 263 12 

Physical Education for Men 251, 252, 253 (3) 

Physiology 209 and 300 (the prerequisites to certain re- 
quired courses) 9 
Electives in health or physical education 4 

Total 193 

The curriculum includes a total of 49 hours of theory and practice 
courses. This entire unit is intended to qualify young men for positions as 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION— MEN 37 

teachers, coaches, or specialists in public and private elementary or second- 
ary schools, colleges, universities, as well as other social agencies which 
promote physical activity programs. The curriculum is designed to meet the 
requirements of state departments of education and other agencies which 
have adopted professional standards. 

Required courses and related experiences are as follows: 

Theory Courses. 101, 303, 305, 341, 350, 354, 365, 370, 376, 381 or 
382, 383, 384, Health Education 460. Physiology 209 and 300 are prerequi- 
sites to Physical Education 303, 305, and 376. 

Practice Courses. 114, 116, 117, 118, 119, and the sections of 151, 152, 
153, 261, 262, 263 which are specially designed for concentrations in physi- 
cal education. All practice courses should be completed by the end of the 
sophomore year. Students who cannot swim must audit a beginner's course 
of instruction before enrolling in 117. 

Student Teaching and Observation. Complete and integrated experi- 
ence in teaching physical education and assisting in coaching under qualified 
supervisors is provided in the co-operating schools of the area. 

Related Professional Experiences. Other valuable experiences are pro- 
vided to supplement the regular course work. Some of these are gained 
through membership in the Physical Education Club; membership in pro- 
fessional associations; participation on intramural athletic teams; serving 
as officials and managers; assisting in service class testing; attendance at 
clinics, workshops, conventions, and conferences; reading of professional 
journals; and working with area recreational and school groups in teaching 
techniques of various activities. 

General and Education Division Requirements. Requirements of the 
University and those of the Education Division must be satisfied. 

36-HOUR CONCENTRATION 

One who desires a 36-hour concentration in physical education must 
complete the following courses: 101, 341, 350, 354, 370, 376, and 6 hours 
from any of 381, 382, 383, and 384. Additionally, he must complete practice 
courses 114, 116, 117, 118, 119, and all six of the courses 151, 152, 153, 
261, 262, 263. 



INTRAMURAL ATHLETICS 

Intramural athletics are an integral part of the physical education 
program at the Edwardsville Campus. The intramural program is designed 
to allow all male students the opportunity to participate regardless of 
athletic ability. An Intramural Council of students serves in an advisory 
capacity to the intramural director. Any male student not on probation 



38 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

may participate. Students on probation may petition the Student Affairs 
Office for permission to continue in the program. The activities, wherever 
possible, are scheduled during the student's free hours. The program is 
financed through the student activity fees. 

Activities that are offered include six-man tackle football, flag football, 
volleyball, soccer, basketball, basketball free throw shooting, bowling, bad- 
minton, Softball, golf, ping-pong, horseshoes, and corkball. Other activities 
will be added as needed and facilities become available. 

A student may earn an intramural varsity letter or intramural minor 
award plaque by earning intramural participation points. An intramural 
player-of-the-year trophy is presented at the end of the school year. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

101-1. ORIENTATION IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION. Intended to introduce 
the student to his professional field, to enable him to secure a concept of 
the role of physical education in total education, and crystallize his 
thinking in relation to vocational objectives. 

114-1. METHODS AND MATERIALS OF TEACHING WRESTLING. Fun- 
damental skills, individual and group methods of wrestling instruction. 
Practice work with recreation and school groups. 

116-2. METHODS AND MATERIALS OF TEACHING GYMNASTICS. To 
develop individual techniques in stunts and tumbling, calisthenics, 
parallel bars, side horse, trampoline, and high bar. Practical work with 
recreation and school groups. 

117-1. METHODS AND MATERIALS OF TEACHING SWIMMING. Em- 
phasis on basic strokes, underwater swimming, elementary diving, body 
and breath control, self-support, and watermanship. If student is non- 
swimmer, he must audit beginner's swimming course prior to registration 
for 117. Practical work with recreation and school groups. 

118-1. METHODS AND MATERIALS OF TEACHING TENNIS. Enables stu- 
dents to acquire, through practice, the knowledge and skills necessary to 
teach this activity. Basic strokes and singles and doubles play are con- 
sidered. Practical work with recreation and school groups. 

119-1. METHODS AND MATERIALS OF TEACHING GOLF. Considers the 
proper techniques of playing golf including use of the various clubs. 
Stresses rules of play and social etiquette involved in the game. Practical 
work with recreation and school groups. 

151-1. TEACHING OF TEAM GAMES I. Stresses development of skills and 
proper teaching techniques for various team games such as soccer, speed- 
ball, touch football, and field hockey. Covers background and historical 
information for these activities. Only for those who concentrate in physi- 
cal education. 

152-1. BASIC RHYTHMS I. Fundamental movements and rhythmic analysis 
as related to physical education activities. Only for those who concen- 
trate in physical education. 

153-1. TEACHING OF TEAM GAMES II. Stresses development of skills and 
proper teaching techniques for various team games such as softball, cork- 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION— MEN 39 

ball, baseball, volleyball, and basketball. Only for those who concentrate 
in physical education. 

251, 252, 253-1. REQUIRED PHYSICAL EDUCATION. Special sections of 
these courses are for those students taking physical education to meet 
the University's general degree requirements. Activities are of an individ- 
ual and group nature such as tennis, golf, soccer, speedball, touch foot- 
ball, softball, volleyball and basketball. The physical fitness of the in- 
dividual is stressed through a program of activities designed for the in- 
dividual. It is strongly recommended that these courses be taken in the 
freshman year. 

254-1. BOWLING. Fundamental skills involved in bowling as well as back- 
ground and practical application of these skills. Can be used as a sub- 
stitute for 251, 252, 253 for general degree requirements. Cannot be used 
by students in physical education as a substitute for the special sections 
of 251, 252, 253. 

261-1. TEACHING OF INDIVIDUAL ACTIVITIES I. Covers such activities 
as paddle tennis, handball, tennis, and such related individual sports. 
Techniques, background, and evaluation of the fundamentals involved 
are considered. Only for those who concentrate in physical education. 

262-1. BASIC RHYTHMS II. Continues from Basic Rhythms I with more in- 
volved fundamental movements and rhythmic activities leading up to 
more advanced co-ordinated activities. Only for those who concentrate 
in physical education. 

263-1. TEACHING OF INDIVIDUAL ACTIVITIES II. Deals with activities 
such as golf, badminton, archery, and swimming. Historical background 
and development of these activities are also considered. Only for those 
who concentrate in physical education. 

303-5. KINESIOLOGY. (Same as Physical Education for Women 303.) Study 
of joint and muscle action as a basis for the mechanical analysis of hu- 
man physical movement as executed in daily life and as executed in 
physical education activities and sports. Prerequisite: Physiology 209, 300. 

305-2. PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR THE ATYPICAL STUDENT. Deals 
with the recognition of physical deviations and with the provisions of 
special or modified physical education or recreational activities for such 
students. Prerequisites: Physiology 209, 300. 

331A-2. THEORY OF SWIMMING COACHING. Foundations and principles 
underlying coaching methods; comparative study of differences in pre- 
vailing theories and methods; development of programs of training in 
pre-season, mid-season, and post-season. Prerequisite: 117. 

331D-2. THEORY OF WRESTLING COACHING. Prepares students to de- 
velop programs of wrestling, including comparative knowledge of prob- 
lems, techniques, materials, and systems in coaching wrestling as well 
as an organization and administration of the wrestling program. Prereq- 
uisite: 114. 

331E-2. THEORY OF TENNIS COACHING. Theory of advanced strokes, 
strategy and tactics; scheduling and conducting matches, tournaments, 
exhibitions and clinics; officiating: organization and promotion of de- 
velopment programs. Prerequisite: 118. 

331F-2. THEORY OF GYMNASTIC COACHING. All phases of gymnastics; 
organization of dual meets, championships, and exhibition teams; prac- 
tice schedules; care and purchase of equipment; development and evalua- 



40 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

tion of exercises and routines; techniques of judging. Prerequisite: 116. 

341-3. PRINCIPLES OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION. The scientific foundations 
of physical education based on accepted principles of psychology, phys- 
iology, sociology, biology, educational method, philosophy, anatomy, 
kinesiology and related areas. Prerequisite: 101. 

345A-1. OFFICIATING OF FALL SPORTS. Interpretation of rules in football, 
cross country, and soccer; techniques of officiating; code of ethics for 
officials and players; problems of officiating. Officiating practice required. 

345B-1. OFFICIATING OF WINTER SPORTS. Interpretation of rules in bas- 
ketball, wrestling, and swimming; techniques of officiating; code of ethics 
for officials and players; problems of officiating. Officiating practice re- 
quired. 

345C-1. OFFICIATING OF SPRING SPORTS. Interpretation of rules in base- 
ball, track and field, tennis and golf; techniques of officiating; code of 
ethics for officials and players; problems of officiating. Officiating prac- 
tice required. 

350-4. METHODS AND MATERIALS FOR TEACHING PHYSICAL EDU- 
CATION ACTIVITIES IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. (Same as 
Physical Education for Women 350.) The organization and conduct of 
the program, program planning, evaluation of materials, observation and 
practice in creative rhythms, singing games, folk dancing, and games of 
low organization. (Required for elementary education.) 

354-4. ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF PHYSICAL EDUCA- 
TION AND ATHLETICS. The organization and conduct of the total 
program of physical education including interscholastic athletics based 
upon accepted educational policies and practices. Emphasis on problems 
of administration. 

355-2. ASSISTING TECHNIQUES. A course giving experience in assisting tech- 
niques with as varied a program of activities as the student schedule 
permits; the professional and required classes as well as the intramural 
program furnishing experiences in officiating and assisting in teaching 
activities according to the season. 

365-2. ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF COMMUNITY 
RECREATION. The social, economic, and governmental structure of the 
community; establishing the community recreation program; problems of 
facilities, equipment, finance, promotion; selecting and supervising per- 
sonnel; integration with associated programs. 

370-4. TESTS AND MEASUREMENTS IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION. (Same 
as Physical Education for Women 370.) Measurement as an aid in de- 
termining student needs, curriculum construction, teaching effectiveness, 
and the attainment of educational objectives. Includes the selection, ad- 
ministration, and interpretation of tests. 

376-3. EMERGENCY CARE AND PREVENTION OF ATHLETIC IN- 
JURIES. The theoretical and practical methods of preventing and treat- 
ing athletic injuries; techniques of taping and bandaging; emergency 
first aid; massage; use of physical therapy modalities. Prerequisite: Phys- 
iology 300. 

381-3. BASEBALL. Theory of coaching baseball plus the various fundamentals 
and techniques of this activity. Includes organization, administration, 
teaching techniques, and proper choice and use of the equipment. Prac- 
tical work with recreation and school groups. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION— MEN 41 

382-3. TRACK AND FIELD. Theory of coaching track and field events plus 
the various fundamentals and techniques of this activity. Includes organ- 
ization, administration, teaching techniques, and proper choice and use 
of equipment. Considers the proper setting up and operating of a track 
and field meet. Practical work with recreation and school groups. 

383-3. BASKETBALL. Theory of coaching basketball plus the various funda- 
mentals and techniques of this activity. Includes setting up practice ses- 
sions, organization, administration, teaching techniques, and proper 
choice of equipment. Practical work with recreation and school groups. 

384-3. FOOTBALL. Theory of coaching football plus the various fundamentals 
and techniques of this activity. Includes discussion of the various forma- 
tions and styles of play as well as organization, administration, teaching 
techniques, and proper choice and use of equipment. Practical work with 
recreation and school groups. 

400-4. EVALUATION IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION. Historical background 
and measurement of physical education; selection and evaluation of con- 
temporary testing devices; structure and use of tests; administering the 
program; and interpretation and application of results. 

402-3. ADMINISTRATION OF INTRAMURAL AND EXTRAMURAL AC- 
TIVITIES. Planning extramural programs of sports; planning and co- 
ordinating extramural activities commonly associated with physical edu- 
cation. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR WOMEN 

SUGGESTED CURRICULUM 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION DEGREE 

General Studies Requirements (See page 7.) 93 

(Three of the activity courses below count toward the normal 
requirement of 96 hours.) 

Education Division Requirements (See page 28.) 15 

(Physical Education 370 satisfies Education Division require- 
ment of Guidance 422.) 

Additional Professional Education Requirements 16 

Secondary Education 315, 352 16 

Physical Education Concentration Requirements 77 

Health Education 334S, 460 8 

Physical Education for Women 1 10 IS, 107, 205, 212, 216, 

223, 230, 239 8 

Physical Education for Women 208, 303, 308, 321, 322, 

323, 349 or 355, 350, 351, 352, 353, 354, 370 48 

Physical Education for Women 214, 215, 222, 254, 255, 
317 (any three) 3 

*A student concentrating in physical education may take a proficiency examination 
in any required activity and substitute an unfamiliar activity for the required one. 



42 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

Physiology 209 and 300 (the prerequisites to certain re- 
quired courses) 9 

Total 20l 

SECONDARY CONCENTRATION 

A 30-hour concentration may be taken in elementary school physical 
education or in secondary school physical education. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



ACTIVITY COURSES 

101S-1. SOCCER. Skills, team tactics, and rules of soccer. 

107-1. FUNDAMENTAL RHYTHMS. Elements of modern and folk dance in- 
cluding basic locomotor movement, rhythmic analysis, and dance steps. 

127-1. FUNDAMENTALS OF BODY MOVEMENT. Exploration and analysis 
of principles affecting movement; body conditioning, posture and body 
mechanics, relaxation techniques. 

204-1. BEGINNING SWIMMING. Physical and mental adjustments to water; 
strokes and safety devices for the non-swimmer and beginner. 

205-1. INTERMEDIATE SWIMMING. Intermediate and advanced techniques, 
strokes, water safety, and diving. Prerequisite: deep-water swimming abil- 
ity and knowledge of a front and back stroke. 

206-1. VOLLEYBALL. Individual and team skills and tactics, including offici- 
ating. 

208-1. AMERICAN SQUARE DANCE AND MIXERS. A course presenting the 
square dances common in various geographical areas of the United 
States, including many of the mixers or get-acquainted dances for start- 
ing parties. 

212-1. BASKETBALL. Fundamental techniques, offensive and defensive team 
play, individual skills. 

213-1. SOFTBALL. Fundamentals of position play, pitching, batting, and field- 
ing techniques. 

214-1. ARCHERY. Techniques of target shooting, including care of equipment 
and safety methods. 

215-1. BADMINTON. Strokes and strategy for singles and doubles play. 

216-1. TENNIS. Forehand, backhand, and serve are stressed. Rules and strategy 
for singles and doubles play. 

218-1. RECREATIONAL SPORTS. Badminton, duck pins, shuffle board, table 
tennis, and other recreational sports. 

222-1. GOLF. Fundamental techniques including the grip, stance, address, for- 
ward and backward swing, and follow-through. 

223-1. FIELD HOCKEY. Stickwork and team tactics for offense and defense 
play. 

224-1. TAP DANCING. Fundamental tap steps and routines for the beginner. 

228-1. DIVING. Techniques of springboard diving. 

230-1. FOLK DANCING. Fundamental steps and dances of various countries. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION— WOMEN 43 

233-1. MODERN DANCE. Fundamentals of rhythmic factors related to move- 
ment, and essentials of choreography. 
239-1. SOCIAL DANCE. Fundamental steps of ballroom dance including the 

fox trot, waltz, polka, rhumba, jitterbug, and other currently popular 

dances. For beginners only. 
249-1. LACROSSE. Fundamental skills for offense and defense; team strategy; 

and rules. 
254-1. BOWLING. Basic techniques, rules, scoring, and strategy of ten-pin 

bowling. 
255-1. FENCING. Elements of attack and parry, bouting, and judging. 
316-1. SWIMMING. Advanced study and perfection of the recognized strokes; 

safety methods, diving, and fundamentals of synchronized swimming. 

Prerequisite: 205 or equivalent. 
317-1. LIFE SAVING AND WATER SAFETY. Techniques of Red Cross life 

saving and water safety. The Senior Life Saving certificate is awarded 

upon satisfactory completion of the requirements. Prerequisite: 205 or 

consent of instructor. 
377-1. HORSEBACK RIDING. 

PROFESSIONAL COURSES 

025-0. ORIENTATION. A course designed to acquaint students with phys- 
ical education as a profession. 

303-5. KINESIOLOGY. (Same as Physical Education for Men 303.) The me- 
chanical analysis of physical education activities through the study of 
joint and muscle action. Prerequisite: Physiology 300. 

308-5. METHODS OF TEACHING DANCING. A comprehensive course deal- 
ing with each of the various types of dance, including fundamentals, pro- 
gressions, and composition in each type. Prerequisites: 107, 224, 233, 
or equivalent. Offered in alternate years. 

321-2 to 6. TECHNIQUES OF TEACHING TEAM SPORTS. Analysis of skills, 
strategy, and methods of teaching team sports. Fall quarter: soccer, speed- 
ball, and field hockey. Winter quarter: basketball. Spring quarter: soft- 
ball and valleyball. 

322-2 to 6. TECHNIQUES OF TEACHING INDIVIDUAL SPORTS. Analysis 
of skills, strategy, and methods of teaching individual sports. Fall 
quarter: archery, badminton, recreational games. Winter quarter: bowl- 
ing, stunts and tumbling, trampoline, and gymnastics. Spring quarter: 
golf, tennis, track and field. 

323-1 to 3. OFFICIATING TECHNIQUES. Study of rules and their interpreta- 
tion; requirements for ratings given by the United States Field Hockey 
Association and the Division for Girls' and Women's Sports. Officiating 
practice required. Fall quarter: field hockey and soccer. Winter quarter: 
basketball. Spring quarter: volleyball and softball. 

348-2 to 4. CAMP AND COMMUNITY LEADERSHIP. Fundamentals of scout- 
ing, camping, and counseling. A weekend camping trip required. 

349-2 to 4. CAMPING EDUCATION. Designed to give the potential camp 
counselor an understanding of the camp; its physical set-up, equipment 
and necessary routines; its personnel, purposes, traditions, and possibil- 
ities. 

350-4. MATERIALS AND METHODS FOR TEACHING PHYSICAL EDU- 
CATION ACTIVITIES IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL, (Same as 



44 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

Physical Education for Men 350.) For supervisors and teachers of phys- 
ical education. Curriculum planning, based on grade characteristics and 
educational philosophy, creative rhythms, singing games, folk dancing, 
games of low organization — skills, skill tests, lead-up games, stunts, and 
tumbling. 

351-4. RECREATION FOR ATYPICAL INDIVIDUALS. Techniques of phys- 
ical examination; postural defects and their correction; activities suitable 
for the atypical; program building; and correlation of this program with 
the physical education curriculum. 

352-2. HISTORY OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION. Survey of physical education 
from ancient times through the modern period, showing the relation 
between aims and practices in physical education and social and phys- 
iological needs of different periods. Offered in alternate years. 

353-4. ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF PHYSICAL EDUCA- 
TION. Criteria for the selection of activities, the organization of classes, 
the policies and the personnel; the physical plant and its upkeep; the 
planning, utilization and care of equipment in the physical education 
program. Offered in alternate years. 

354-2. PRINCIPLES OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION. The fundamental prin- 
ciples, aims, objectives of physical education, the place of physical educa- 
tion in the educational program, and the problems of athletics. 

355-3. TECHNIQUES OF TEACHING SWIMMING. Methods of teaching, 
analysis of strokes, and the devices for teaching swimming and life sav- 
ing. Prerequisite: 205 or equivalent and the consent of instructor. 

370-4. TESTS AND MEASUREMENTS IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION. (Same 
as Physical Education for Men 370.) The theory of measurement in 
health and physical education, the selection and administration of appro- 
priate tests, and the interpretation of results. Projects required. 



PSYCHOLOGY 

Programs in psychology are offered for students who are working 
toward a Bachelor of Arts degree or a Bachelor of Science in Education 
degree. 

SUGGESTED CURRICULA 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

For this degree in the Social Sciences Division, a concentration in 
psychology requires a minimum of 44 hours in psychology and other 
courses (named below). 

The following courses can be counted toward a concentration in psy- 
chology: General Studies Area B 253, Guidance 305, Guidance 420 or 
Mathematics 220 or 410, Physiology 209, Special Education 414. 

One who intends to pursue graduate studies in psychology should in- 
clude in his undergraduate psychology concentration the following courses: 



PSYCHOLOGY 45 

211, 305, 307, 311, 407, 421, Guidance 420 or Mathematics 220 or 410, 
GSB 253 or Psychology 201. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION DEGREE 

For this degree in the Education Division, a concentration in psy- 
chology requires a minimum of 48 hours in psychology and other courses 
(named above). 

One who intends to teach in the public schools or to pursue graduate 
studies in guidance should include in his undergraduate program the follow- 
ing courses: 303, 305, 307, 407, 421, Guidance 305, 420, GSB 253 or 
Psychology 201. 

SECONDARY CONCENTRATION 

In both the Education Division and the Social Sciences Division a 
secondary concentration consists of 27 hours. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

201-4. INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY. Introduction to the psychological 
nature of man, his development, motivations, emotions, learning, think- 
ing, and perceiving. 

211-4. PRINCIPLES AND METHODS OF PSYCHOLOGY I. An introduction 
to the experimental methods utilized in the study of behavior. The work 
emphasizes the application of these methods to the study of sensory and 
perceptual phenomena, and response characteristics. Prerequisite: 201. 

301-4. CHILD PSYCHOLOGY. Development of the human person from in- 
fancy to maturity, with emphasis on the early and middle years of child- 
hood. Prerequisite: 201. 

303-4. ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY. Intensive study of development trends 
and influences during the adolescent years, with consideration of the 
special interpersonal problems encountered in this period. Prerequisite: 
201. 

305-4. PERSONALITY DYNAMICS. Exploration of human motivations, per- 
sonality patterns, and ways of coping with the stresses of modern life. 
Prerequisite: 201. 

307-4. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY. Introduction to the field of social psychology, 
with emphasis on attitude formation and intergroup relations. Prereq- 
uisite: 201. 

311-4. EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY. Introduction to the experimental 
analysis of behavior. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisite: 201. 

320-4. INTRODUCTION TO INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY. A study of the 
functions of psychology as a science and as a profession in contemporary 
business and industry. Prerequisite: 201. 

407-4. THEORIES OF LEARNING. Consideration of systematic explanations 
of human and animal learning which have emerged from psychological 
laboratories. Prerequisite: 201. 

421-4. PSYCHOLOGICAL TESTS AND MEASUREMENTS. Principles of psy- 



46 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

etiological measurement, including errors of measurement, techniques 
for estimating reliability and validity, techniques of test construction, 
and problems in assessment and prediction. Prerequisite: 8 hours of psy- 
chology. 

431-4. PSYCHOPATHOLOGY. The nature, etiology, and treatment of psy- 
chological disorders. Observations in a state mental hospital. Prereq- 
uisite: 305 or consent of instructor. 

432-4. MENTAL HYGIENE. An integration of psychological knowledge and 
principles concerning factors in personal life that tend to facilitate or to 
deter mental health. Prerequisite: 305 or consent of instructor. 

437-3. FUNDAMENTALS OF COUNSELING. Introduction to the common 
assumptions, dimensions, and communicative skills underlying psycho- 
logical counseling. Prerequisite: 305 or consent of instructor. 

465-4. GROUP DYNAMICS. Development of principles of group functioning 
applicable to industry, schools, clinical practice, and community living. 
Prerequisite: 307 or consent of instructor. 

479-4. PSYCHOLOGY OF INDUSTRIAL CONFLICT. Consideration of social 
and psychological factors underlying controversies between workers and 
management. Prerequisite: 320 or consent of instructor. 

490-1 to 8. INDEPENDENT PROJECTS. Independent readings and projects in 
psychology. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 



SECONDARY EDUCATION 

Secondary education concerns itself with the professional courses in 
education, selecting and meeting requirements for teaching areas, and ad- 
vising generally those who plan to teach any age or grade in a secondary 
school. 

It is recommended that a student who is preparing to teach on the 
secondary level concentrate in one of the following areas: 



Art 


Foreign Languages * 


Music 


Botany x 


Geography x 


Physical Education 


Business 


Government * 


Physics * 


Chemistry x 


History x 


Speech 


English a 


Mathematics 1 


Zoology a 



Each student must complete all of the University's general require- 
ments, listed in this bulletin. In the social studies area he must take either 
American history or government (History 201 or 202 or Government 210). 

The minimum concentration is either 48 hours in one field and 27 in 
another or 36 hours in one field and 27 in each of two others. Each con- 
centration must meet the minimum preparation for teaching in that field. 

1 A reading knowledge of a foreign language is required in these concentrations. 



SECONDARY EDUCATION 47 

In addition to University, divisional, and concentration requirements, 
a student in secondary education has certain professional education require- 
ments for certification. The following program meets the state requirements 
and also offers opportunity for experiences designed to produce maximum 
teaching effectiveness: Administration 331-3, 355-4, Guidance 305^4, 422-4, 
Secondary Education 315-4, 352-12, and Instructional Materials 417-4. 

Students working toward the Bachelor of Arts degree who desire to 
meet only the minimum state standards for certification are to take the 
following program in professional education: Administration 331-3, 355-4, 
Guidance 305-4, 422-4, Secondary Education 315-4, 352-8, and Instruc- 
tional Materials 417-4. 

In either program the student should be familiar with the requirements 
for admission to student teaching, which are discussed in this bulletin. Also, 
he should check with his adviser as early as the beginning of the junior 
year to see that he has met or will meet the requirement of knowing the 
provisions and principles of the Constitution of the United States and of 
the state of Illinois. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

315-4. HIGH SCHOOL METHODS. Various types of procedures used for ef- 
fective classroom teaching constitute the basis of study and discussion. 
The problem approach and unit method are stressed. 

352D-8 to 12. SECONDARY STUDENT TEACHING. 

352E-4to8. SECONDARY STUDENT TEACHING. Prerequisite: 352D-8. 

407-4. THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL. The place of the junior high school in 
the organizational pattern, with major emphasis upon the areas of organ- 
ization, administration, and curriculum. 

SPECIAL METHODS COURSES. In some fields of study special methodology 
courses are offered by the faculty of that subject area. See these listings 
in the fields of art education, business education, English, foreign lan- 
guages, history, mathematics, music education, physical education and 
health, science, and social studies. 

487-4. TEACHING THE NATURAL SCIENCES IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS. 
Objectives of science education; instruction methods and techniques ap- 
propriate for teaching science; desirable equipment, audio-visual aids, 
and instructional material; development of a course outline and at least 
one instruction unit. Prerequisite: 315 or consent of instructor. 

488-4. TEACHING THE SOCIAL STUDIES IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS. 
Social studies objectives for grades 7 through 12; methods and procedures 
for most effective instruction; useful textbook references and audio-visual 
materials; preparation of a course outline and detailed plans for one or 
more instruction units. Prerequisite: 315 or consent of instructor. 

490-4. WORKSHOP IN ECONOMICS EDUCATION. (Same as Economics 
490.) Designed to assist elementary and secondary school teachers in 
promoting economic understanding through the translation of economic 
principles and problems into classroom teaching materials. 



48 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



SPECIAL EDUCATION 

The Education Division offers an undergraduate concentration in 
special education leading to certification as teacher of the educable, men- 
tally-handicapped children. 

Students in other areas of elementary education may qualify for this 
special certificate by completing selected courses in special education. 
Usually these courses may be taken during the junior and senior years. This 
arrangement enables a student to qualify for a regular teaching certificate 
and a special certificate. 

Information relative to programs leading to a master's degree appears 
in the Graduate School bulletin. 



SUGGESTED CURRICULUM 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION DEGREE 

General Studies Requirements (See page 7. Waive GSC 151, 152.) 90 

Education Division Requirements (See page 28.) 19 

Elementary Education Requirements (See page 31.) 74 

Special Education Concentration Requirements 32 

Elementary 314, 337 (8) 

Psychology 301 4 

Special Education 410, 412, 413, 414, 420, (428) 20 

Student Teaching: 8 hours with educable, mentally- 
handicapped children 8 

Total 215 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

351D-8. ELEMENTARY STUDENT TEACHING. 

410-4. PROBLEMS AND CHARACTERISTICS OF THE MENTALLY RE- 
TARDED. Objectives, curriculum, methods, and materials of instruction 
for slow learners. Emphasis upon the principles of learning as they can 
be applied to this group. Observations. Prerequisite: Guidance 305 or 
Psychology 301 or 303. 

412-4. EDUCATION OF GIFTED CHILDREN. Designed to help teachers in 
the identification of, and programming for, gifted and talented children. 
Prerequisite: Guidance 305 or Psychology 301 or 303. 

413-4. DIRECTED OBSERVATION OF EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN. Taken 
concurrently with a problem course in a specific area which provides 
student observation and participation in individual work with excep- 
tional children. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 



SPECIAL EDUCATION 49 

414-4. THE EXCEPTIONAL CHILD. Physical, mental, emotional, and social 
traits of all types of exceptional children. Effects of handicaps in learning 
situations. Methods of differentiation and techniques for rehahilitation. 
Individual case studies used; observations and field trips. Prerequisites: 
Guidance 305, Psychology 301 or 303. 

417-4. THE ATYPICAL CHILD AND SOCIAL AGENCIES. A survey of social 
agencies contributing to the welfare and care of exceptional children. 
Emphasis on services rendered and on methods of contact and cost. Visits 
made to agencies and institutions; specialists invited to appear before the 
class. Prerequisites: Guidance 305 or Psychology 301 or 303, and Soci- 
ology 101. 

420-4. METHODS AND MATERIALS FOR TEACHING EXCEPTIONAL 
CHILDREN. Offered in conjunction with practice teaching, dealing 
with methods and materials needed in teaching specific types of excep- 
tional children. 

428-4. SPEECH CORRECTION FOR THE CLASSROOM TEACHER. (Same 
as Speech Correction 428.) Etiology and therapy of common speech de- 
lects. Open to in-service teachers, seniors, and graduate students in 
education. 



STUDENT TEACHING 

The student teaching program at the Edwardsville Campus is admin- 
istered in co-operation with the public schools of the area. Elementary and 
secondary teachers in these schools are selected as co-operating teachers 
by the superintendent of the district and the University's co-ordinator of 
student teaching. 

The student is assigned to an elementary or secondary school for a 
period of twelve weeks. During this period he is under the supervision of 
the co-operating teacher and the university supervisor. The student spends 
the major part of each school day with the co-operating teacher in in- 
structional and co-curricular activities. He is inducted gradually into 
teaching through observation, limited participation, and finally full in- 
structional responsibility. For this program, the student receives 8, 12, or 16 
hours of credit, which fulfills the student teaching requirements for the 
bachelor's degree. 

Student teaching courses available at the Edwardsville Campus are 
listed below: 

Elementary Education 

350D-8 to 12. Kindergarten- Primary Student Teaching. 
350E-4 to 8. Advanced Kindergarten-Primary Student Teaching. Prereq- 
uisite: 350D. 
351D-8tol2. Elementary Student Teaching. 
351E-4 to 8. Advanced Elementary Student Teaching. Prerequisite: 35 ID. 



50 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

Secondary Education 

352D-8 to 12. Secondary Student Teaching. 

352E-4 to 8. Secondary Student Teaching. Prerequisite: 352D. 

Special Education 

351D-8. Elementary Student Teaching. 

STUDENT TEACHING PREREQUISITES 

GENERAL 

1. Application must be made to the Student Teaching Office two full 
quarters prior to the quarter when the student desires to do his student 
teaching. All forms must be completed and returned to the Student Teach- 
ing Office before the student has officially applied. 

2. The student must have 144 quarter hours with a C (3.0) average 
before beginning work in student teaching and a C (3.0) average in his 
professional education courses. 

3. The student must have completed GSD 153-3 with a grade of C (3.0) 
or better and a favorable recommendation from the speech instructor. 

4. The student must have established at least one quarter of residence at 
the Edwardsville Campus earning a minimum of 16 hours of credit prior 
to doing student teaching. 

5. The state of Illinois requires that all students doing student teaching 
take a physical examination including a tuberculin test or a chest X-ray. 
Forms for these examinations can be obtained from the University Health 
Service office and should be returned to the same office at least two months 
prior to the student entering the public school classroom. 

6. The Education Division strongly recommends a September field ex- 
perience prior to student teaching. Arrangements for September experiences 
should be made through the Student Teaching Office. 

7. The Education Division recommends that 16 hours of student teaching 
be taken; however, the student can receive 4, 8, 12, or 16 hours of credit. 

8. Student teaching for 8 hours of credit is to be done on a one-half-day 
basis, and the student must be able to clear his schedule for the complete 
morning or afternoon as required. 

9. The student must have the approval of his adviser in his area of con- 
centration before he will be accepted for student teaching. 

10. Placement forms must be completed prior to the student's entering into 
the Student Teaching program. 



STUDENT TEACHING 51 



SECONDARY 

1. The student must have at least 30 quarter hours in the subject area 
in which he proposes to teach. 

2. The student must have at least 1 1 quarter hours in professional educa- 
tion courses prior to doing his student teaching; Guidance 305 and Second- 
ary 315 must be among the 1 1 hours. 

ELEMENTARY 

1. Student teaching must be done in the morning. 

2. The student must have had Guidance 305, Elementary 314, and 337. 

EARLY CHILDHOOD 

1. The student must meet the elementary requirements with one excep- 
tion: He must take Elementary 316 instead of 314. 

2. In addition, 4 more hours of student teaching must be taken at the 
kindergarten level. 

3. The student must have taken three terms of Music 040 or pass a pro- 
ficiency examination in piano. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 

1. The student must meet the elementary requirements. 

2. In addition, the student must take Special Education 410 and 413. 

3. The student must take 8 quarter hours of student teaching in ele- 
mentary education. 



Fine Arts Division 



Art; Music; Speech 

the objectives of the Fine Arts Division are to broaden and intensify ex- 
periences in the fine arts in the area served by the University; to impart to 
students an awareness of the cultural values of the arts through formal 
courses of instruction, exhibitions, concerts, and performances; to provide 
facilities for the creative and scholarly pursuit of the arts; and to offer 
specialized programs to serve the ends of liberal and professional education. 

Associate Professor Lloyd G. Blakely, Mus.A.D. (Boston) 1958 
Associate Professor Herrold E. Headley, Ph.D. (North Texas State) 1958 

Associate Professor David C. Huntley, M.A. (North Carolina) 1962 

Associate Professor Andrew J. Kochman, Ph.D. (Wisconsin) 1960 

Associate Professor John A. Richardson, Ed.D. (Columbia) 1959 

Associate Professor John F. Rios, Ph.D. (Texas) 1962 

Associate Professor Edwin B. Warren, Ph.D. (Michigan) 1957 

Associate Professor Hollis L. White, Ph.D. (Missouri) 1962 

Assistant Professor Kenwyn G. Boldt, M.M. (Indiana) 1959 

Assistant Professor Evelyn T. Buddemeyer, B.S. (Missouri) 1957 
Assistant Professor Clifton Cornwell, Jr., 

M.A. (Missouri) (on leave, 1962-63) 1958 

Assistant Professor Clinton D. Fjerstad, M.M. (Indiana) 1959 

Assistant Professor Robert B. Hawkins, Ph.D. (Northwestern) 1959 

Assistant Professor Assen D. Kresteff, Ph.D. (Munich) 1959 

Assistant Professor Catherine E. Milovich, M.A. (Columbia) 1959 

Instructor Richard O. Bell, M.F.A. (Ohio) 1962 

Instructor Jerome M. Birdman, M.A. (Illinois) 1961 

Instructor Glen E. Howerton, M.S. (Fort Hays Kansas State) 1960 
Instructor John D. Randall, B.S. (Illinois Institute of Technology) 1961 

Instructor Mary Belle Smith, M.A. (Iowa) 1957 

52 



FINE ARTS DIVISION 53 



Lecturer Maude Ellsworth, B.F.A. (Kansas State Teachers) 1961-62 

Lecturer Betty G. Gardner, M.A. (Iowa State) 1962-63 

Lecturer Walter Kemper III, M.F.A. (Kansas) 1961 

Lecturer Michael J. McHale, M.A. (Western Reserve) 1962-63 

Lecturer Dorothy E. Tulloss, M.A. (Columbia) 1962 



DIVISIONAL REQUIREMENTS 

Because of the diverse nature of the instructional areas of the Fine Arts 
Division and because of the varying requirements of the bachelor's degrees 
whose concentrations fall within the division, no attempt is made to list 
divisional requirements; instead under each area of instruction are listed 
the requirements within the Fine Arts Division leading to the Bachelor of 
Arts, Bachelor of Science in Education, and Bachelor of Music degrees. 



ART 

Undergraduate offerings in art provide both introductory and special- 
ized experiences. Curricula are planned for those desiring a concentration 
in art and for those interested in art as an avocation. 

The Fine Arts Division reserves the right to withhold an example of 
the work of each student in each class. Such works become a part of a 
permanent collection from which exhibitions may be prepared. 

During his senior year any art student may petition the art faculty to 
grant him the privilege of an exhibition of his work. Such an exhibit may 
be comprised of the work of an individual or may be composed of the works 
of several seniors. Participation is not required for graduation; permission 
to participate is extended in recognition of industry and ability. 

SUGGESTED CURRICULA 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

General Studies Requirements (See page 7. Waive GSC 151, 152, 

153, 154.) 84 

Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements (See page 9.) (15) 

Art Concentration Requirements 55 

General Studies Area C 351, 352, 353 (12) 

Art 100-15, 201-8, 203-8, 310-8, 358-8, 8 hours from 
these: 305, 310, 324, 325, 358 55 

Secondary Concentration Requirements 24-27 



54 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

Electives 26-29 

Total 192 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION DEGREE 

For this degree in the Education Division, the following courses consti- 
tute a concentration in art: 100-15, 201-8, 203-8, 300-4, 310-8, 358-8, 
365-4, GSC 351, 352, 353. They total 67 hours. 

SECONDARY CONCENTRATION 

A secondary concentration in art requires 100-15, 201 or 203-8, and 
8 hours from the following: 300, 305, 310, 324, 358, 365, GSC 153, 351, 
352, 353. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

100-5 to 15. BASIC STUDIO. Three quarter sequence. A comprehensive survey 
of various technical areas of art. First-hand experience with a number of 
different media. Required of all students concentrating in art and rec- 
ommended for others interested in basic studio experience. Prerequisite 
to all studio courses other than 300. 

201-4 to 8. DRAWING AND COMPOSITION. Two-quarter sequence. An ex- 
tension and intensification of Basic Studio experiences with special em- 
phasis on draughtmanship and composition. Prerequisite: 100-15. 

203-4 to 8. BEGINNING CERAMICS. Two-quarter sequence. An exploration 
of the technical and aesthetic possibilities of the potter's craft. Prereq- 
uisite: 100-15. 

300-4 to 12. ART EDUCATION. Theory and practice of art activities in the 
elementary schools with attention to teaching methodology. Designed 
primarily to meet the needs of elementary-education students. 

305-4 to 12. ADVANCED CERAMICS. Intensive study of ceramics as an art 
form. Prerequisite: 203-8. 

3 10-4 to 12. OIL PAINTING. Intensive study of oil painting as a medium of 
expression. Individual rather than group problems are engaged. Prereq- 
uisite: 201-8. 

324-4. WATERCOLOR. Intensive study of watercolor painting as a medium of 
expression. Transparent watercolor, gouache, casein, and tempera tech- 
niques may be explored. Prerequisite: 201-8. 

325-4 to 12. STUDIO. Advanced independent study and research. Work may 
be undertaken in painting, sculpture, jewelry, drawing, printmaking, 
pottery, weaving and other crafts. (Media of the student's selection.) 
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

358-4 to 12. PRINTS. An introduction to printmaking as a medium. Studio 
projects in intaglio, relief, and planographic processes. Prerequisite: 
201-8. 

365-4. ART EDUCATION IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOLS. For art educa- 
tion majors preparing to teach on secondary level; includes studio proj- 



ART 55 

ects designed to develop awareness of technical and aesthetic needs of 
high school students, reading and discussion of literature, planning of 
curriculum, and instructional facilities. 

401-4 to 8. RESEARCH IN PAINTING. Projects undertaken combine academic 
research of a historical nature with technical experimentation on the 
part of the painter. The project is stated in writing and submitted for 
approval and evaluation to a committee constituted of two art instructors 
and a third faculty member. Prerequisite: consent of the art faculty. 

406-4 to 8. STUDIO IN PAINTING. Advanced independent study to be carried 
out under the committee established for 401. Prerequisite: 401-4. 

410-4 to 8. RESEARCH IN PRINTS. Identical to 401 except for medium. Pre- 
requisite: 358-12 or consent of art faculty. 

416-4 to 8. STUDIO IN PRINTS. Advanced independent study to be carried 
out under the committee established for 410. Prerequisite: 410-4. 

420-4 to 8. RESEARCH IN POTTERY. Identical to 401 except for medium. 
Prerequisite: 305-12 or consent of art faculty. 

426-4 to 8. STUDIO IN POTTERY. Advanced independent study under the 
committee established for 420. Prerequisite: 420-4. 



MUSIC 

During the academic year the music staff of the Fine Arts Division 
brings to the campus a series of distinguished musicians who join the faculty 
and students for a period of workshops, seminars, and performances. The 
series has included such artists as Sigurd Rascher, saxophonist; Leonard 
Smith, cornetist; Sidney Foster, pianist; the Ritter-Allen Duo (violin- 
piano); Reginald Kell, clarinetist; and John Barrows, French horn. In addi- 
tion to the several public performances of the major musical ensembles, a 
recital series is provided. 

The music stafT offers service courses in music to students in the other 
divisions of the University and curricula leading to the following baccalau- 
reate degrees: Bachelor of Music, for students in the Fine Arts Division 
with specialization in music performance or in music education and Bache- 
lor of Arts, for students in other divisions but desiring concentration in 
music as part of their general cultural education. 

SUGGESTED CURRICULA 

Detailed requirements in music are stated in a handbook provided by 
the music faculty. 



BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

This curriculum is designed for students who wish to specialize in music 
as part of their general cultural education. It is also designed to provide a 



56 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

background training for those who may plan to pursue advanced studies 

in music. 

General Studies Requirements (See page 7.) Waive GSC 151, 152, 

153.) 87 

Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements (See page 9.) (15) 

Music Concentration Requirements 48 

GSC 154,255,357,358 (12) 

Music 105, 106, 107, 205, 206, 207 21 

Music performance major (2 hours per quarter) 12 

Music major ensemble 6 

Music electives 9 

Secondary Concentration Requirements 24-27 

Electives 30-33 

Total 192 

A secondary concentration in music includes Music 105, 106, 107; 1 
hour of credit per quarter for six quarters in performance major; 6 hours in 
a major ensemble; GSC 154, 255. Total: 30 hours. 



BACHELOR OF MUSIC DEGREE 

Music Performance 

General Studies Requirements (See page 7. Waive GSC 151, 152, 

153, 154.) 84 

Music Performance Concentration Requirements Ill 

Music 105, 106, 107, 205, 206, 207, 309, 310, 312, 313, 318, 

326, 327, 442, 443 48 

Music, private applied (major instrument) 45 

Music, major ensemble (1 hour per quarter) 12 

Music, class piano or secondary instrument/voice 6 

Total 195 

This curriculum is suggested for the first-quarter freshman or for the 
new transfer student. A student previously enrolled at the Edwardsville 
Campus with a concentration in music performance should follow the cur- 
riculum suggested as Plan I, page 72 of the Vol. 3, No. 7, General An- 
nouncements issue of the Southern Illinois University Bulletin. 

Voice concentrations in music performance include one year each of 
French and German. Students in performance specializations other than 
voice and those with probable future specializations in music theory-com- 
position, music history-literature, or church music, should consult with 
their adviser as to the sequence to be followed in languages. 



MUSIC 57 



Music Education 

This curriculum is suggested for the first-quarter freshman or for the 
new transfer student. Students previously enrolled at the Edwardsville 
Campus with a specialization in music education will follow the curriculum 
suggested as Plan II, page 72 of the Vol. 3, No. 7, General Announcements 
issue of the Southern Illinois University Bulletin. 

American history or government is required of the student with spe- 
cialization in music education. 

One year of French or German is recommended for the student with 
vocal-choral emphasis in music education. Modern language is not re- 
quired of the student with instrumental or combined choral-instrumental 
emphasis in music education. 
General Studies Requirements (See page 7. Waive GSC 151, 152, 

153.) 87 

Music Education Concentration Requirements 87-96 

Music 105, 106, 107, 205, 206, 207, 309, 318, 319, 326 33 

Music, private applied (major instrument) 21 

Music, major ensemble (1 hour per quarter) 12 

Music, class piano or secondary instrument/voice 12-21 

Music 301, 302, 303 9 

Professional Education Requirements 35 

Guidance 305, 422 8 

Education 315, 331, 355, 35 IE, 352D 23 

Instructional Materials 417 4 

Total 209-218 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

THEORY COURSES 

105-4, 106-4, 107-4. THEORY OF MUSIC. Fundamentals of music through 
sight singing, dictation, written, and keyboard harmony. 

200-3. FUNDAMENTALS OF MUSIC. Rudiments of music for those with 
little or no musical background, recommended as a course preliminary 
to 300. (Not for music curricula.) May be taken concurrently with 040. 

205-3, 206-3, 207-3. THEORY OF MUSIC. Continuation of 105, 106, 107. 
Advanced harmonic techniques, modulation, altered chords, chromatic 
harmony, counterpoint, and introduction to contemporary harmonic 
principles. Prerequisite: 107. 

309-3, 310-3. ORCHESTRATION I, II. The techniques of writing for orches- 
tral instruments. Prerequisite: 207. 

312-3. COMPOSITION I. Original composition in the smaller forms for piano, 
voice, string quartet, and other small combinations. Prerequisite: 207. 



58 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

313-3. COMPOSITION II. Original composition in the larger forms. Prereq- 
uisite: 312. 

326-3. ANALYSIS I. Analysis of the important musical forms and styles from 
plain song through the 12-tone technique with emphasis on forms of 
the 18th and 19th centuries. Prerequisite: 207, or consent of instructor. 

327-3. ANALYSIS II Analysis of the larger homophonic and contrapuntal forms 
from the 18th century to the present. Prerequisite: 326, or consent of in- 
structor. 

367-3. CONTEMPORARY COMPOSITIONAL TECHNIQUES. Analysis of 
styles, forms, and techniques of representative composers from the Im- 
pressionists to the present day; application to original compositions. Pre- 
requisite: 366, or consent of instructor. 

442-3. COUNTERPOINT. Analysis and creative writing in the style of Pales- 
trina and his contemporaries and the contrapuntal-harmonic technique 
of Bach. Prerequisite: 207. 

443-3. CANON AND FUGUE. Analysis and creative writing of the larger 
imitative forms. Prerequisite: 442. 

HISTORY AND LITERATURE COURSES 

315-3. OPERATIC LITERATURE. A survey of operatic literature from its be- 
ginning to the present day. Live and recorded music augments the dis- 
cussions. 

353-3. ORGAN LITERATURE. A study of the literature for the organ with 
emphasis upon music for the church service. 

366-3. CONTEMPORARY MUSIC. Study of the development of musical styles 
and forms from Impressionism to the present day. Prerequisite: 327, 332, 
or consent of instructor. 

411-3. SYMPHONIC LITERATURE. A study of the development of the sym- 
phony and the symphonic poem. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

412-3. CHORAL LITERATURE. The literature of the larger vocal forms such 
as the cantata and oratorio. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

413-3. CHAMBER MUSIC LITERATURE. Study of chamber music from the 
Renaissance to the present. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

CHURCH MUSIC COURSES 

347-3. CHURCH MUSIC I. Study of the great liturgies of all denominations: 
early Christian, Catholic, Greek Orthodox, Jewish, Anglican, Lutheran, 
and Protestant, together with their historical and contemporary signifi- 
cance. 

348-3. CHURCH MUSIC II. Study of the music used in the contemporary 
church with an emphasis upon the anthem and the choral response. 

349-3. CHURCH MUSIC III. (Hymnology) Survey of the great hymns of the 
ages, their history, interpretation and significance. 

MUSIC EDUCATION COURSES 

300-3. MUSIC EDUCATION— ELEMENTARY. Teaching music in the ele- 
mentary grades. (Not for music curricula.) Prerequisite: 200 or equiva- 
lent. 

301-3. MUSIC EDUCATION IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. Music in 
the elementary school curriculum, grades K-6. Analysis of instructional 



MUSIC 59 

materials, development of rhythmic and melodic expressions, creative, in- 
strumental, listening activities. Creating a musical environment in the 
classroom. For music concentration only. 

302-3. MUSIC EDUCATION IN THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL. Curriculum, 
organization, and administration of choral, instrumental, and general 
music classes; resource units; the adolescent voice. 

303-3. MUSIC EDUCATION IN THE SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL. Curriculum, 
organization, and administration of choral, instrumental, and general 
music classes. 

307-4. RECREATIONAL MUSIC. For those interested in the less formal ap- 
proach to music and for prospective leaders of recreational activities. 

318-3. CONDUCTING— GENERAL. Fundamental conducting patterns, size 
of beats, use of each hand; conducting experience with laboratory groups 
both choral and instrumental; discussion and study of musical termi- 
nology. 

319-3. CONDUCTING— CHORAL AND INSTRUMENTAL. Continued con- 
ducting experience through laboratory group; study of rehearsal tech- 
niques, balance, blend, and the relationship of parts to the total en- 
semble; evaluation and analysis of literature suitable for school groups 
of all levels of ability. Prerequisite: 318. 

451-2. THE TEACHING OF GENERAL CLASSROOM MUSIC IN THE 
JUNIOR AND SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL. 

455-2. WORKSHOP FOR ELEMENTARY MUSIC EDUCATION. 

461-2. TEACHING TECHNIQUES AND MATERIALS FOR THE INTER- 
MEDIATE LEVELS. Piano or voice. Designed to meet the needs of 
piano or voice specializations in the Bachelor of Music or the Master of 
Music degree programs. Problems of private studio teaching and college- 
level teaching are studied. 

462-2. TEACHING TECHNIQUES AND MATERIALS FOR THE AD- 
VANCED STUDENT. Piano or voice. Continuation of 461. 

MUSIC PERFORMANCE COURSES 

Ensembles: 

001-1. UNIVERSITY BANDS. 

001C-0. STAGE BAND. 

001E-0. INSTRUMENTAL LABORATORY. 

002EM/ 2 . UNIVERSITY CHORUS. 

002C-1. COLLEGIATE SINGERS. 

003-1. UNIVERSITY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. 

345-1. MADRIGAL SINGERS. 

346-2 to 12. OPERA WORKSHOP. 

355-1. CHAMBER MUSIC. String ensemble, quartet. 

365-1. CHAMBER MUSIC. Woodwind and brass ensemble. 

Private instruction is offered in the following areas of applied music. Credit 
varies from one to four hours. Consult with adviser for details of credit and 
requirements. 
Oil. VIOLIN 022. OBOE 

012. VIOLA 023. CLARINET 

013. CELLO 024. BASSOON 

014. STRING BASS 025. SAXOPHONE 
021. FLUTE 031. PERCUSSION 



60 



SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



041. PIANO 

051. FRENCH HORN 

052. TRUMPET 

053. TROMBONE 



054. TUBA 

055. BARITONE 
061. VOICE 
071. ORGAN 



Class instruction is offered in all areas of applied music. These courses in- 
clude the minimum instruction required for passing the proficiency examinations 
in piano and voice and they offer practical training in the basic principles of 
playing the instruments of the orchestra and band. They also include intro- 
ductory techniques and methods for teaching instrumental and vocal groups in 
the elementary and secondary schools. Each course is offered for one hour of 
credit each quarter. 



010a. CLASS VIOLIN 
010b. CLASS VIOLA 
010c. CLASS CELLO 
OlOd. CLASS STRING BASS 
020a. CLASS FLUTE 
020b. CLASS OBOE 
020c. CLASS CLARINET 
020d. CLASS BASSOON 
020e. CLASS SAXOPHONE 



030. CLASS PERCUSSION 
040. CLASS PIANO 
050a. CLASS FRENCH HORN 
050b. CLASS TRUMPET 
050c. CLASS TROMBONE 
050d. CLASS TUBA 
050e. CLASS BARITONE 
060. CLASS VOICE 



APPLIED MUSIC COURSES 

Candidates for the master's degree who wish to choose applied music courses 
as electives will take the 400-series course in their major instrument or voice for 
two hours of credit per quarter. 

Elective courses in applied music in major instrument or voice: 
47 1-2 to 8. PRIVATE PIANO 
472-2 to 8. PRIVATE VOICE 
473A-2 to 8. PRIVATE VIOLIN 
473B-2 to 8. PRIVATE VIOLA 
473C-2to8. PRIVATE VIOLONCELLO 
473D-2 to 8. PRIVATE BASS VIOL 
474A-2to8. PRIVATE FLUTE 
474B-2 to 8. PRIVATE OBOE 
474C-2 to 8. PRIVATE CLARINET 
474D^2 to 8. PRIVATE BASSOON 
474E-2to8. PRIVATE SAXOPHONE 
475A-2to8. PRIVATE TRUMPET 
475B-2 to 8. PRIVATE FRENCH HORN 
475C-2 to 8. PRIVATE BARITONE 
475D-2 to 8. PRIVATE TROMBONE 
475E-2 to 8. PRIVATE TUBA 
476-2 to 8. PRIVATE ORGAN 



SPEECH 

The success of the American system of representative democracy de- 
pends largely upon the effectiveness with which men use oral communica- 
tion to formulate and implement decisions. The success of a liberal educa- 



SPEECH 61 

tion depends largely upon the effectiveness with which men use oral 
communication in their pursuit of truth, justice, and beauty. Thus, the 
basic objectives of Speech are (1) to help students prepare themselves for 
more effective participation in the making and implementing of democratic 
decisions, and (2) to show students how speech can help them obtain a 
liberal education. 

Specifically, the study of speech is essential in preparing students for 
such fields as business management, law, industrial and public relations, 
public administration, secondary school teaching or for further academic 
work at the graduate level. 

Course offerings represent the major areas of speech: rhetoric and 
public address, speech science and correction, radio, television, and theater. 

SUGGESTED CURRICULA 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

Three curricula are offered: (1) General Speech, (2) Speech Educa- 
tion, (3) Theater. A student pursuing the Speech Education program must 
fulfill the professional education requirements as outlined in the Education 
Division section of this bulletin. 

Every student who concentrates in speech must participate in the 
Speech Arts Performance Program for three quarters. This program is ad- 
ministered under Speech 230 and 330. He must also present a special 
Graduation Project in his senior year before an examining committee of 
speech faculty members. The committee shall certify the candidate's per- 
formance only if said performance meets certain minimum standards of ex- 
cellence. The kind of project shall be worked out by the student and his 
adviser. Examples include the following: preparing and delivering an ex- 
tensive and thoroughly documented paper on some national or interna- 
tional problem; writing and producing a one-act play; writing and produc- 
ing a radio or television play. Unlike the Speech Arts Performance Program, 
in which students may work together (e.g., in theatrical productions or 
on debate teams), the Graduation Project is to be performed by the student 
alone. 

The following cognate concentrations are recommended: any one of 
the social sciences (such as history, economics, sociology, political science, 
psychology), for students in general speech; English literature or a foreign 
language or any one of the social sciences, for those in speech education. 

General Speech and Speech Education 

General Studies Requirements (See page 7.) 96 

Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements (See page 9.) (15) 

Speech Concentration Requirements 48 



62 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

Speech 102, 104, 202, 224, 230 or 330 18 

Speech electives in at least three of the four speech areas 
listed below under "Course Descriptions" (306 is re- 
quired for certification in secondary education) 30 

Secondary Concentration Requirements 24 

A secondary concentration of at least 24 hours in one of the 
social sciences is strongly recommended for General Speech, 
in a social science or English literature or a foreign language 
for Speech Education. 

Electives 24 

Total 192 



Theater 

General Studies Requirements (See page 7.) 96 

Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements (See page 9.) (15) 

Speech Concentration Requirements 58 

General Studies Area C 153, 154, 254, 354, 355 (15) 

Art 100 5 

English 360, 361, 365, 366, 369, 406, 463 (any 4) 16 

Philosophy 360 4 

Speech 104, 224, 230 or 330 11 

Theater 121, 122, 203, 204, 402, 439 22 

Secondary Concentration Requirements 24 

Electives 14 

Total 192 



SECONDARY CONCENTRATION IN SPEECH 

It is recommended that a student who desires a 27-hour concentration 
in speech take courses based upon his interest and faculty advisement. For 
secondary education certification, 306 must be included. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

Courses are listed numerically in 4 categories: rhetoric and public ad- 
dress, radio and television, speech correction, and theater. 

RHETORIC AND PUBLIC ADDRESS 

102-4. PUBLIC SPEAKING. Analysis of audience motives and reactions stressed 
in the approach to speech preparation for typical public speaking situa- 
tions. Prerequisite: GSD 153. 



SPEECH 63 

104-4. TRAINING THE SPEAKING VOICE. Designed for those students who 
desire to improve their voice and articulation. Prerequisite: GSD 153. 

201-2. PARLIAMENTARY LAW. How to conduct a meeting. Study and prac- 
tice of the rules of parliamentary procedure. Prerequisite: GSD 153. 

202-3. PRINCIPLES OF DISCUSSION. Principles and methods of group dis- 
cussion. Current problems used as materials for discussion. Prerequisite: 
GSD 153 

205-3. PRINCIPLES OF ARGUMENTATION AND DEBATE. Principles of 
argument, analysis, evidence, reasoning, fallacies, briefing, and delivery. 
Prerequisite: GSD 153. 

224-4. COMMUNICATIVE READING. Study of and practice in the analysis of 
literature and its oral communication to an audience. Prerequisite: GSD 
153. 

230-1 to 3. SPEECH ACTIVITIES. Directed public performance in one or more 
of the following: Speaking, communicative reading, theater, radio, tele- 
vision. Kind of activity to be determined by student and his adviser. 
One hour per quarter. Possible to earn up to three hours, not necessarily 
in consecutive quarters. Prerequisite: GSD 153. 

301-4. PERSUASION. Psychological principles involved in influencing individ- 
uals and groups. Prerequisite: GSD 153. 

303-4. BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL SPEAKING. Speaking needs of busi- 
ness and professional people. Technical reports and lighter types of 
speaking included in the types studied. Primarily for adult and extension 
classes. Prerequisite: none. 

306-4. TEACHING SPEECH IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS. Philosophy of 
speech education, and effective teaching of speech through curricular 
and extracurricular work. Required of speech students working for a 
secondary education degree in Education Division. Prerequisite: 16 hours 
of speech. 

330-1 to 3. SPEECH ACTIVITIES. For description of this course, see descrip- 
tion of Speech 230. One hour per quarter. Possible to earn up to 3 hours, 
not necessarily in consecutive quarters. Prerequisite: GSD 153. 

408-4. PSYCHOLOGY OF SPEECH. Nature and development of speech, its 
basic psychology, and the part speech plays in personality development. 
Prerequisite: GSD 153. 

414-4. HISTORY AND CRITICISM OF GREAT SPEAKERS AND THEIR 
SPEECHES. A survey of the leading American and European speakers as 
they relate to great historical issues and movements. Prerequisite: GSD 
153. 

449-4. GENERAL SEMANTICS. Study of the relationships between spoken 
language and reality and case studies of communications breakdowns. 

RADIO AND TELEVISION 

257-4. FUNDAMENTALS OF BROADCAST WRITING. Oral and visual 
forms of writing for radio and television. Short continuity forms and 
commercial presentations. Prerequisite: GSD 153. 

273-4. BASIC RADIO PRODUCTION. Production of various types of programs 
from conception through completion, including writing, direction, per- 
formance. Station operational procedures. Prerequisite: GSD 153. 

368-3. FUNDAMENTALS OF TELEVISION PRODUCTION. Use of equip- 
ment and basic techniques in production of television programs of all 



64 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

types. Three one-hour lectures and three one-hour scheduled laboratory 
periods per week. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 
393-3. RADIO, TELEVISION, AND SOCIETY. The interrelation of radio and 
television with social habit patterns and with economic and political 
systems. Case studies. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

SPEECH CORRECTION 

428-4. SPEECH CORRECTION FOR THE CLASSROOM TEACHER. Etiol- 
ogy and therapy of common speech defects. Open to in-service teachers, 
seniors, and graduate students in education. Prerequisite: GSD 153. 

THEATER 

121-3, 122-3. PRODUCTION TECHNIQUES. Lectures and practical experi- 
ences in stagecraft, lighting, costuming, make-up, property construction 
and stage movement. One quarter may be required as prerequisite to 
courses numbered above 200. 

203-4. SCENIC DESIGN. A basic course employing graphic and plastic media, 
intended to acquaint students with solutions to the problems encountered 
by the director, scene designer, costumer, and lighting director. 

204-4. ACTING. Theory and practice. Application of modern principles to the 
performance of various theatrical styles. Prerequisites: GSC 254 and con- 
sent of instructor. 

306-4. INTRODUCTION TO PLAYWRITING. Analysis of dramatic struc- 
ture; the study of scriptwriting techniques. The student will be required 
to write scenes or a short play. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

310-3. CHILDREN'S THEATER. Creative dramatics; dramatization of chil- 
dren's literature; play production for elementary schools. Recommended 
for education concentrations. 

402-4. DIRECTING. Selection of plays, casting, and methods of rehearsal. De- 
velopment of characterization, control of tempo, and similar problems 
studied. Students to direct or to aid in directing one-act plays and major 
productions. 

439-4. CONTEMPORARY THEATRICAL THEORY AND PRACTICE. The 
development of modern theatrical production; study of recent ideas in 
theater architecture, staging and performance. Consideration of the film 
and television as dramatic media. Prerequisite: 121 or 122; 313a or 313b. 



Humanities Division 



Comparative Literature; English; Foreign Languages; Humanities 
(Honors Program); journalism; Philosophy 

The Humanities Division provides instruction in the intellectual disciplines 
of English and other languages, of literature, and of ideas. The division is 
concerned with instruction in the reading, writing, and speaking of English 
and other languages, the development of an understanding and apprecia- 
tion of literature, and the concomitant recognition of its civilizing values. 
The division guides advanced students in methods of studying the works, 
men, and movements that make up literary and intellectual history. All 
students are encouraged to think and to write rationally, imaginatively, 
and responsibly as they learn to identify persistent human problems and 
their classic and current solutions. 

Professor William T. Going, Ed.D. (Michigan) 1957 

Professor Nicholas T. Joost, Ph.D. (North Carolina) 1958 

Professor Alfred G. Pellegrino, Ph.D. (Montreal) 1962 

Associate Professor James C. Austin, Ph.D. (Western Reserve) 1960 

Associate Professor Robert W. Duncan, Ph.D. (Cincinnati) 1957 

Associate Professor Paul F. Guenther, Ph.D. (North Carolina) 1960 

Associate Professor Charles S. Hensley, Ph.D. (Missouri) 1960 

Associate Professor George W. Linden, Ph.D. (Illinois) 1962 

Associate Professor Gerald J. T. Runkle, Ph.D. (Yale) 1959 

Associate Professor Raymond J. Spahn, Ph.D. (Northwestern) 1957 

Associate Professor Marion A. Taylor, Ph.D. (Iowa) 1958 

Assistant Professor leva Asmute, Ph.D. (North Carolina) 1962 

Assistant Professor A. Edwin Graham, Ph.D. (Princeton) 1959 
Assistant Professor Charles Parish, 

Ph.D. (New Mexico) (on leave, 1961-63) 1959 

65 



66 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

Assistant Professor Stella P. Revard, Ph.D. (Yale) 1961 

Assistant Professor Josef E. Ryberg, Ph.D. (Illinois) 1962 
Assistant Professor W. Winslow Shea, 

Ph.D. (Yale) 1958 

Assistant Professor William C. Slattery, Ph.D. (Arkansas) 1962 
Assistant Professor Gladys Roberta Steinman, 

M.A. (Illinois) 1957 
Assistant Professor Myron W. Taylor, 

Ph.D. (Washington University) 1959 
Assistant Professor Jules Zanger, 

Ph.D. (Washington University) 1960 

Instructor John I. Ades, M.A. (Cincinnati) 1958 

Instructor Vernon T. Hornback, M.A. (St. Louis) 1959 

Instructor Robert Murdoch, M.A. (Washington University) 1957 



Lecturer Albert S. Carter, Jr., M.A. (Princeton) 1959-63 

Lecturer Mary D. Doak, M.A. (Wisconsin) 1962-63 

Lecturer Dale Doerke, M.A. (Washington University) 1962-63 

Lecturer Donald E. Dolton, M.A. (Oklahoma State) 1959-63 
Lecturer Herman A. Dreifke, 

M.A. (Washington University) 1959-63 

Lecturer Joan T. Geetter, M.A. (Pennsylvania) 1962-63 

Lecturer Helen D. Goode, M.A. (Kansas) 1962 

Lecturer Nelvin W. Heisner, M.A. (Southern Illinois) 1962-63 

Lecturer Ann Elizabeth Jones, Ph.D. (Michigan) 1961-62 

Lecturer Carol A. Kurth, M.A. (St. Louis) 1961-62 

Lecturer Richard W. Lee, B.S. (Illinois) 1962-63 

Lecturer Garry N. Murphy, M.A. (Cincinnati) 1960-63 

Lecturer Michael N. Smith, M.A. (Indiana) 1961-63 

Lecturer Lee Snider, B.A. (Whitman College) 1961-62 

Lecturer Robert G. Stanley, M.S. (Kansas State) 1959-63 



DIVISIONAL REQUIREMENTS 

Students who plan to concentrate in one of the disciplines in the Hu- 
manities Division and who have completed 80 hours of college credit must 
file a tentative program with their adviser in the division. (Students who 
plan secondary concentrations within the Humanities Division are urged to 
do so.) Such students must first present no single grade lower than C (3.0) 
in General Studies areas C and D. A concentration in the Humanities 



COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 67 

Division is recognized as completed only with a grade of C or higher in 
each course. 

Candidates for the Bachelor of Arts degree electing a concentration in 
the Humanities Division must have two years of college-level foreign lan- 
guage. 



COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

The secondary concentration in Comparative Literature is 37 hours, 
prescribed as follows: 301, 302, 303, 311, 312, 313; two years of foreign- 
language study on the college level; Philosophy 360 or any single 300- or 
400-level foreign-language course is acceptable as an alternate for any one 
of the electives in Comparative Literature (314, 315, or 399). Prerequisite 
for all courses: second-level General Studies requirement. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

301-4. COMPARATIVE LITERATURE BEFORE THE RENAISSANCE. 
Readings in translations of selected works by authors from Homer to 
Dante. 

302-4. COMPARATIVE LITERATURE FROM RENAISSANCE TO EN- 
LIGHTENMENT. Readings in translations of selected works by authors 
from Rabelais to Racine. 

303-4. COMPARATIVE LITERATURE FROM ENLIGHTENMENT TO 
MODERN TIMES. Readings in translations of selected works by authors 
ranging from Voltaire to Kafka. 

311-4. COMPARATIVE LITERATURE: LYRIC AND EPIC POETRY. The 
development and influence of lyric and epic forms and themes in the 
world's poetry; readings in translations of selected works. 

312-4. COMPARATIVE LITERATURE: THE DRAMA. Development of 
drama; study of dramatic genres; readings in translations of selected 
works. 

313-4. COMPARATIVE LITERATURE: PROSE. Study of types of prose in the 
world's literature, with emphasis on influences and typal relationships; 
readings in translations of selected works. 

314_4. THE DEVELOPMENT OF TRAGEDY. Development of the tragic 
drama from Aeschylus to the present; study of varying conceptions of 
themes and structure in tragedy through different cultures and ages; 
readings in translations of selected works. 

315-4. THE NOVEL SINCE 1900. Figures, influences, and trends in the novel 
since 1900, in selected translations. 

399-4. TRADITIONAL THEMES OF WORLD LITERATURE. Persistent 
themes in the world's literature, e.g., Faust, Utopia, Ulysses, the Grail; 
readings in translations of selected works. Prerequisite: any two 300- 
or 400-level literature courses in English, foreign languages, or com- 
parative literature, one of which should be in the field last named. 



68 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



ENGLISH 

SUGGESTED CURRICULA 



BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

General Studies Requirements (See page 7.) 96 

Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements (See page 9.) (15) 

Humanities Division Requirements (See page 66.) 9 

English Concentration Requirements 48 

General Studies Area C 151 (3) 

General Studies Area C 251, 252 or 253 (They count three 
hours toward the 48-hour concentration, 6 hours toward 
the General Studies Requirements.) (3) 

English 300, 302, 309, 310, 316, 317, 365 28 

English electives numbered above 299 in three of these cate- 
gories: aesthetics, drama, fiction, poetry (2 hours for a 
third GSC-2 literature course may be counted toward 
these English electives.) 14 

Secondary Concentration Requirements 24-27 

Electives 12-15 

Total 192 

This concentration should be supplemented in various ways by adding 
period surveys like 314, 315; advanced composition 390, 392, 492; language 
studies 400, 403; teaching of English 485; and membership in an English 
Club (the Athenaeum, the Humanities Club, or Lambda Iota Tau); and 
a plan of supplementary readings, as designed by the division. 

SECONDARY CONCENTRATION 

A 28-hour concentration in English includes the following: 
GSC 151-3 (Introduction to Poetry). 

One hour from 200-level General Studies literature in Area C. 
English 302, 316, and 317 (Survey of English Literature). 
English 309 and 310 (Survey of American Literature). 
English 300 (Principles of English Grammar). 
One year college-level study of a foreign language, or the equivalent. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

Students beyond the freshman level who desire additional instruction 
in understanding and writing the English language should consider either 



ENGLISH 69 

auditing or repeating for credit English Composition (GSD 151 and 152) 
or enrolling in English 390 or 391. The student should be guided by the 
descriptions of these courses and by the advice of the English staff. 

Students can proceed to the 300 level only after completing the 200- 
level requirements. 

300-4. PRINCIPLES OF ENGLISH GRAMMAR. Required for English students. 
Others should take 391. Credit not allowed for both courses. 

302-4. ENGLISH LITERATURE TO 1550. 

309-4. A SURVEY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE TO I860. 

310-4. A SURVEY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE SINCE 1860. 

316-4. ENGLISH LITERATURE, 1550 to 1750. 

317-4. ENGLISH LITERATURE AFTER 1750. 

320-4. EARLY NINETEENTH-CENTURY POETRY. 

335-4. THE SHORT STORY. 

365-4. SHAKESPEARE. 

390-3. ADVANCED COMPOSITION. Expository writing. 

391-3. USAGE IN SPOKEN AND WRITTEN ENGLISH. The essentials of 
grammar and the "common decencies." Prerequisite to student teaching, 
except in English curricula, which require 300. 

392-3. PROFESSIONAL WRITING I. Introductory course for undergraduates. 
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

400-4. STRUCTURAL LINGUISTICS. An analysis of the structure of modern 
English, to supplement the student's traditional approach to grammar 
with a knowledge of the contemporary structural approach to language. 

403-4. THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE. A history. Knowledge of German a de- 
sirable preparation for the course. 

404-4. CONTEMPORARIES AND SUCCESSORS OF CHAUCER. Late four- 
teenth and early fifteenth century English literature, from Sir Gawayne 
and the Grene-Knight to the Scottish Chaucerians. 

405-4. MODERN AMERICAN POETRY. The important poets since Whitman. 

406-4. AMERICAN DRAMA. The rise of the theater in America, with reading 
of plays, chiefly modern. 

412-4. SIXTEENTH CENTURY NONDRAMATIC LITERATURE. Prereq- 
uisites: one or more survey courses up to and including the sixteenth 
century. 

413-4. SEVENTEENTH CENTURY NONDRAMATIC ENGLISH LITERA- 
TURE. 

414-4. EIGHTEENTH CENTURY NONDRAMATIC ENGLISH LITERA- 
TURE. 

415-4. EARLY ROMANTICS. Major emphasis on general background and on 
Blake, Coleridge, and Wordsworth. 

416-4. LATER ROMANTICS. Major emphasis on Byron, Shelley, and Keats; 
also the minor figures. 

417-4. VICTORIAN LITERATURE. Ideas, forms, and personalities in English 
literature from 1830 to 1900. Prerequisite: 317. 

421-4. VICTORIAN POETRY. Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, and other poets 
of England, 1830-1900. Prerequisite: 205, 317. 

422-4. MODERN BRITISH POETRY. 

423-4. MODERN AMERICAN POETRY. A study of the important poets, be- 
ginning with Robinson. Prerequisite: 309 or 310. 



70 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

424-4. ENGLISH RENAISSANCE. Non-dramatic literature. 

441-4. THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY ESSAY. The informal essay and the 
literary periodicals — The Spectator, Tatler, Guardian, Rambler, Idler, 
and Goldsmith's Citizen of the World ("Chinese Letters"). 

447-4. AMERICAN HUMOR AND SATIRE. A consideration of the writers 
and forms of nineteenth and twentieth century humor. 

454-4. EIGHTEENTH CENTURY NOVEL. Defoe through Jane Austen. 

455-4. VICTORIAN NOVEL. Major novelists and principal tendencies in 
English fiction, 1830-1900. Prerequisite: 211 or 317. 

457-4. CONTEMPORARY BRITISH FICTION. Outstanding figures, influ- 
ences, and trends in the British novel and short story since 1900. 

458-4. AMERICAN NOVEL. The novel in America from its beginnings to the 
early twentieth century. Prerequisite: 309 or 310. 

459-4. CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN FICTION. Trends and techniques in 
the American novel and short story since 1914. 

460-4. RENAISSANCE DRAMA. The evolution of the 'regular' drama from 
the mid 1550's to the closing of the theaters. Extensive reading of plays 
and familiarity with the contemporary theatrical background. 

461-4. RESTORATION AND EIGHTEENTH CENTURY DRAMA. British 
drama after 1660; representative types of plays from Dryden to Sheridan. 

463-4. MODERN BRITISH DRAMA. 

464-4. MODERN CONTINENTAL DRAMA. The continental drama of Eu- 
rope since 1870; representative plays of Scandinavia, Russia, Germany, 
France, Italy, Spain, and Portugal. 

468-4. AMERICAN DRAMA. The rise of the theater in America, with readings 
of plays, chiefly modern. Prerequisite: 309 or 310. 

470-4. CHAUCER. 

471-4. SHAKESPEARE. The plays before 1600. Readings on the life of Shake- 
speare, the theater, and the acting company. 

472-4. SHAKESPEARE. The plays of 1600 and later. Readings on the life of 
Shakespeare, the theater, and the acting company. 

473-4. MILTON. 

485-4. PROBLEMS IN THE TEACHING OF ENGLISH. Aims, methods, mate- 
rials, tests, programs, and other aspects of English instruction in the high 
school. 

486-2 to 8. WORKSHOP IN HIGH SCHOOL ENGLISH. Intensive workshop 
study in lectures, laboratory, conferences on the teaching of English in 
high school. Curriculum, materials, methods, aims. Directed by compe- 
tent authorities in the field. 

487-2 to 8. WORKSHOP IN JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL ENGLISH. Intensive 
workshop study in lectures, laboratory, conferences on the teaching of 
English in junior high school. Curriculum, materials, methods, aims. 
Directed by competent authorities in the field. 

492-4. PROFESSIONAL WRITING II. Prerequisites: 392, consent of instructor. 

495-4. HISTORY OF LITERARY CRITICISM. The ideas and techniques of 
criticism, from Aristotle to the end of the nineteenth century. 

498-4. MODERN LITERARY CRITICISM. Recent critics and critical attitudes, 
and practice in writing criticism. 

499-2 to 6. READINGS IN ENGLISH. For English concentrations only. Only 
four hours may be taken in any one quarter. Prerequisite: consent of 
division. 



HUMANITIES 71 



HUMANITIES 

The prerequisite for the Humanities (Honors) sequence is the com- 
pletion of the second-level General Studies courses. The sequence is given 
for undergraduate credit only, and entrance to it is by invitation of the 
Humanities Honors Program Committee. For further information regarding 
the Honors program offered by the Humanities Division, consult the 
General Information issue of the Southern Illinois University Bulletin, Vol. 
4, p. 64 (Individual Honors Work). 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

301-3. HUMANITIES (HONORS). 
302-3. HUMANITIES (HONORS). 
303-3. HUMANITIES (HONORS). 



JOURNALISM 

The Edwardsville Campus offers no concentration in journalism. The 
following courses, however, may be elected by any student who desires 
some specialized training in this field. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

103-3. NEWS. Study of the newspaper story with experience in writing and 
rewriting news; the fundamentals of copyreading. 

201-3, 202-3, 203-3. NEWS WRITING AND EDITING I, II, III. How to 
cover assignments and write news stories; preparation of copy for publi- 
cation; writing headlines, laboratory experiences. 

330-3. EDITORIAL WRITING. The work and responsibility of the editor and 
editorial writer with emphasis upon editorial writing and thinking. Edi- 
torial problems, methods, policies, and style. 

340-3. THE LAW OF JOURNALISM. Legal limitations and privileges affect- 
ing publishing, fair comment, criticism, contempt of court, right of pri- 
vacy, copyright, and legal provisions affecting advertising. 

345-3. HISTORY OF JOURNALISM. Development of American journalism 
with emphasis upon the struggle for freedom of the press, leading edi- 
tors, outstanding newspapers and periodicals. 

370-4. PRINCIPLES OF ADVERTISING. Advertising fundamentals in rela- 
tion to modern business activities; economic and social aspects, research, 
media, appeals, production, schedules. Prerequisite: Economics 205. 

391-3. FEATURE WRITING. 



72 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

SUGGESTED CURRICULA 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

General Studies Requirements (See page 7.) 96 

Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements (See page 9.) (15) 

Humanities Division Requirements (See page 66.) (9) 

Foreign Languages Concentration Requirements 48 

A minimum of 42 hours (exclusive of General Studies) in a 
language including one course in advanced conversation 
(220-4), one course in advanced composition (French 
351 or 353, German 304, Spanish 351), and 486. If the 
language is Spanish, then 333 must be included. 42 

English (one course above 299) 3 

History (one course above 299) 3 

Secondary Concentration Requirement 24-27 

Electives 21-24 

Total 192 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION DEGREE 

For this degree in the Education Division, the Foreign Languages 
Concentration Requirements are 38 hours (exclusive of General Studies 
courses and elementary education concentration courses) in a language, 
plus one English and one history course numbered above 299. 



SECONDARY CONCENTRATION 

A secondary concentration consists of 24 hours (exclusive of General 
Studies) in a language. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

Students taking work in any General Studies foreign-language series 
should note that the first two quarters of the sequence will not be counted 
as electives toward graduation unless the third quarter is also completed. 
An elementary foreign-language sequence or its equivalent is required of 
all students who elect a foreign-language concentration. 

The student who has completed one year of high-school foreign Ian- 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES 73 

guage will usually begin with the second quarter of the first-year sequence. 
The student who has completed two years of high-school foreign language 
will usually begin with the intermediate course. 

GENERAL FOREIGN LANGUAGE COURSES 

399-2 to 6. READINGS. For foreign language concentrations only. Divisional 
consent required. No more than four hours may be taken in any one 
quarter. 

435-4 to 8. WORKSHOP IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL FOREIGN LAN- 
GUAGE INSTRUCTION. (Same as Elementary Education 435.) De- 
signed to assist elementary school teachers in integrating foreign lan- 
guages into their teaching program as well as to encourage high school 
teachers to introduce or supervise foreign languages at the elementary 
level. Prerequisite: basic language credit. 

486-4. MATERIALS AND METHODS FOR TEACHING FOREIGN LAN- 
GUAGES. Techniques of using instructional methods, especially adapted 
to teaching a language; examination of books, periodicals, and audio- 
visual materials; construction of a course outline and plans for one or 
more instructional units. Prerequisite: Secondary Education 315 or Ele- 
mentary Education 314 or concurrent taking of either one. Required for 
those planning to teach a foreign language. 

FRENCH COURSES 

173C-1, 174C-1, 175C-1. FRENCH CONVERSATION. Courses in conversa- 
tion and oral drill taken with GSD 173, 174, 175 by students who wish 
additional oral training: elected only by students enrolled in the cor- 
responding beginning sections. 

201-3, 202-3, 203-3. INTERMEDIATE COURSE. Grammar; composition; oral 
practice; rapid reading of modern authors. Prerequisite: GSD 175 or two 
years of high school French. 

220-2 to 6. FRENCH CONVERSATION. Conversation based largely on topics 
either of current or cultural interest. Prerequisite: GSD 175. 

301-3. THE FRENCH NOVEL OF THE EIGHTEENTH AND NINE- 
TEENTH CENTURIES. Lectures, collateral reading, and reports, Pre- 
requisite: 203. 

302-3. SEVENTEENTH- AND EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY DRAMA. Inten- 
sive study of Corneille, Racine, Moliere, Lesage, Voltaire, Marivaux, and 
Beaumarchais. Outside reading of minor dramatists. Prerequisite: 301 or 
consent of instructor. 

303-3. FRENCH LYRIC POETRY. French versification; Romantic, Parnassian, 
and Symbolist schools; contemporary poets. Prerequisite: 302 or consent 
of instructor. 

304-3. FRENCH CONTEMPORARY NOVEL. Study of the novel from 1889 
to the present, with emphasis on the symbolist, regional, psychological, 
and sociological novels. Detailed study of Proust or Gide. 

305-3. FRENCH CONTEMPORARY DRAMA. Study of French Drama from 
Dumas fils to the present, with emphasis on the piece a these, the 
theatre libre, symbolist drama, and the drama of modern social prob- 
lems. 



74 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

311-4, 312-4, 313-4. SURVEY OF FRENCH LITERATURE. A study of the 
important currents of French literature from the beginning to the present 
time. Prerequisite: 203. 

340-2. FRENCH LITERATURE OF THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY. Rabelais, 
Montaigne, the memoir writers, Marot, The Pleiade, and d'Aubigny. 

351-4. ADVANCED COMPOSITION. Rapid grammar review, study of idio- 
matic construction; weekly themes. Course conducted in French. 

353-4. ADVANCED COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION. Oral and 
written composition of a practical nature for advanced students; inten- 
sive study of idiomatic expression and current usage. 

GERMAN COURSES 

161-0. GERMAN FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS. Intensive study of grammar 
and vocabulary. Designed for graduate students desiring a reading knowl- 
edge of German. 

176c-l, 177o-l, 178c-l. GERMAN CONVERSATION. Courses in conversation 
and oral drill taken with GSD 176, 177, 178, by students who wish ad- 
ditional oral training; elected only by students enrolled in the corre- 
sponding beginning sections. 

201-3, 202-3, 203-3. INTERMEDIATE COURSE. Grammar review and ex- 
pansion; reading in modern prose; conversation and composition. Pre- 
requisite: GSD 178 or two years of high school German. 

220-2 to 6. ADVANCED GERMAN CONVERSATION. Conversation based on 
topics of current interest; extensive use of German newspapers, period- 
icals, and records. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

251-4. SCIENTIFIC GERMAN. Study of vocabulary and sentence construction 
as commonly found in German scientific writings. Prerequisite: one year 
of college German or equivalent. 

301-4, 302-4. SURVEY OF GERMAN LITERATURE. The historical develop- 
ment of German literature; lectures, reading of representative authors. 

303-4. GERMAN "NOVELLE" IN THE NINETEENTH AND TWENTIETH 
CENTURIES. A study of representative works after 1800, with emphasis 
on the literary movements of that time. 

304-5. KULTURGESCHICHTLICHE AUFSAETZE UND SPRECHUE- 
BUNGEN. Advanced composition and conversation based on the history 
of German civilization. Required for prospective teachers of German. 

311-4, 312-4. INTRODUCTION TO GERMAN CLASSICAL LITERATURE. 
Lessing, Goethe, Schiller. Reading and discussion of representative works. 

313-4. GERMAN DRAMA IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY. Reading and 
discussion of representative works. 

401-2. GOETHE'S FAUST, PART I. The Faust legend and early Faust books 
and plays; the genesis of Goethe's Faust; reading of Part I. 

402-2. GOETHE'S FAUST PART II. Reading of Part II; study of Goethe's 
Weltanschauung. 

403-3. GERMAN BALLADS AND LYRICS. A selective study of the foremost 
examples of German balladry and lyric poetry. 

LATIN COURSES 

201-4. INTERMEDIATE COURSE. Prerequisite: two years of high-school 
Latin or its equivalent. 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES 75 

202-4. CICERO'S ESSAYS. Prerequisite: 201. 
203-4. LIVY. Prerequisite: 202. 

PORTUGUESE COURSE 

100-5. INTRODUCTORY COURSE. Especially for Spanish concentrations. 
Prerequisite: Spanish 203 or consent of instructor. All 5 hours will count 
toward a Spanish concentration of 42 hours or more. Only 3 hours will 
count toward a Spanish concentration of less than 42 hours. 

RUSSIAN COURSES 

186C-1, 187C-1, 188C-1. RUSSIAN CONVERSATION. Courses in conversa- 
tion and oral drill, taken only by students enrolled in the corresponding 
sections of GSD 186, 187, 188, for additional practice. 

201-3, 202-3, 203-3. INTERMEDIATE COURSE. Reading of classical and 
modern narrative prose; oral practice and sight reading; advanced com- 
position. Prerequisite: GSD 188. 

220-2 to 6. RUSSIAN CONVERSATION. Advanced conversation based on top- 
ics of current interest. Prerequisite: GSD 188. 

SPANISH COURSES 

190C-1, 191C-1, 192C-1. SPANISH CONVERSATION. Courses in conversa- 
tion and oral drill to be taken with GSD 190, 191, 192, by students who 
wish additional oral training; elected only by students enrolled in the 
corresponding beginning sections. 

201-3, 202-3, 203-3. INTERMEDIATE COURSE. Grammar review, composi- 
tion, oral practice, rapid reading of modern authors. Prerequisite: GSD 
192 or two years of high school Spanish. 

220-2 to 6. SPANISH CONVERSATION. Conversation based on topics either 
of current or cultural interest. Prerequisite: GSD 192. 

301-3. SPANISH NOVEL OF THE NINETEENTH AND TWENTIETH 
CENTURIES. Study of representative novels and authors from the Reg- 
ionalists to the present time. Prerequisite 203. 

303-3. SPANISH DRAMA OF THE NINETEENTH AND TWENTIETH 
CENTURIES. Reading of selected plays of the chief dramatists from 
Rivas to Bueno Vallejo. Prerequisite: 203 or consent of instructor. 

304-3. SPANISH POETRY OF THE NINETEENTH AND TWENTIETH 
CENTURIES. Study of Spanish poetry with relation to major literary 
movements: romanticismo, modernismo, ultraismo, and vanguardismo. 
Special attention will be given to the following poets: Rivas, Zorilla, 
Espronceda, Dario, Jiminez, Torre, and Lorca. Prerequisite: 203. 

311, 312, 313-4. SURVEY OF SPANISH LITERATURE. A survey, continuing 
down to the present day. Lectures and reading of representative authors. 
Prerequisite: 203. 

315-3. ARTE Y CULTURA. Conducted in Spanish. Informal class discussions 
of reports of students on present-day topics relating to the life and in- 
terests of Latin America and Spain; extensive use of films. Prerequisite: 
220 or consent of instructor. 

316-3. CIVILIZACION ESPANOLA. A study of the cultural patterns and heri- 
tage of the Spanish people from earliest times to the present. Prerequi- 
site: 315 or consent of instructor. 



76 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

333-3. SPANISH AMERICAN LITERATURE. Survey of Spanish literature in 
America from the conquest to modern times. 

340-3. THE GOLDEN AGE. Extensive individual readings of the plays of 
Lope de Vega, Calderon, Tirso, Ruiz de Alarcon, and others, with class 
reports and intensive study of some one dramatist. 

345-4. CERVANTES. Study of the life of the author and the Quijote with ref- 
erence to style and source of materials. Comparative reports on the nov- 
els and other works. 

351-3. ADVANCED COMPOSITION. Daily themes based on Spanish models, 
with free composition once a week. Class discussions. 

360-8. STUDY-TOUR OF MEXICO. Two weeks of lectures and intensive con- 
versational drill on campus; four weeks in Mexico. Series of lectures by 
Mexican teachers during residence in Mexico City and on excursions in 
the country. Final week on campus for completion of individual projects 
and reports. Prerequisite: advanced standing in Spanish. 

410-4. ROMANCE PHILOLOGY. A survey of the phonology, morphology, and 
syntax changes in Romance Languages in general; special attention to 
developments in French and Spanish for students in these fields. This 
course may be counted toward either a French or Spanish concentration. 
Prerequisite: Spanish or French 203. 

415-3. SPANISH PHONETICS. Analysis of the sounds of Spanish, their man- 
ner of production, and special drill in connected passages of prose and 
poetry. 



PHILOSOPHY 

A secondary concentration consists of 24 hours, including 381, 382, 
383, and excluding GSC 152. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

Courses on the 300 level are for juniors and seniors only, except where 

consent is granted by the instructor. 

200-4. TYPES OF PHILOSOPHY: AN INTRODUCTION. Survey of the tradi- 
tional branches and problems of philosophy, such as religion, meta- 
physics, epistemology, ethics, political theory, aesthetics, and history. 

240-4. ETHICS. Study of significant ethical theories concerned with such prob- 
lems as the nature of right and wrong, individual and social values. 

300-4. ELEMENTARY METAPHYSICS. Presentation of answers to the most 
general problems of existence. An attempt to unify all scientific ap- 
proaches to reality through the laying down of common principles. 

301-4. PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION. An analysis of problems in the psychol- 
ogy, metaphysics, and social effects of religion. Among topics discussed 
are the nature of mystical experience, the existence of God, and problems 
of suffering, prayer, and immortality. 

302-4. WORLD RELIGIONS. An historical and comparative study of the prin- 
cipal religions of the world. Particular attention is given to such non- 
Christian faiths as Hinduism, Buddhism, and Islam. 



PHILOSOPHY 77 

305-4. PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE. A nontechnical discussion of philosophic 
problems as they emerge from the various sciences, with readings from 
works addressed to the lay public. 

324-4. SYMBOLIC LOGIC. Use of symbols as tools for analysis and deduction. 
Study of truth tables, Boolean Expansions, propositional calculus and 
quantifiers, logic of relations, and their functions in logistic systems. 

342-4. SOCIAL AND POLITICAL THEORY. Philosophical analysis of social 
values and their expression in governmental organization. 

355-4. PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION. Survey of theories of education and 
their relationships to educational policies and practices, as elucidated by 
the great teachers. Satisfies the education requirement, Education 355. 

360-4. PHILOSOPHY OF ART. The significance of art as a human activity, 
its nature and standards as seen in the problems of criticism, and the 
relation of art to other forms of knowledge. 

381-4. GREEK AND EARLY CHRISTIAN PHILOSOPHY. Pre-Socratics, Plato, 
Aristotle, early Christians, and others. 

382-4. MEDIEVAL AND EARLY MODERN PHILOSOPHY. Problems of me- 
dieval philosophy and their restatement in the seventeenth and eight- 
eenth centuries. Aquinas, Descartes, Locke, and others. 

383-4. RECENT PHILOSOPHY. Kant, Hegel, Schopenhauer, Mill, Bergson, 
Dewey, Russell, and others. 

386-4. AMERICAN PHILOSOPHY. A survey of American philosophic thought 
from colonial days to the present, with emphasis on such recent thinkers 
as Pierce, James, Royce, Dewey, and Santayana. Prerequisites: 382, 383. 

484-4. ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL POLITICAL THEORIES. (Same as Gov- 
ernment 484.) A study of outstanding political theories of the ancient 
and medieval periods, including theories of Aristotle, Plato, Cicero, St. 
Augustine, and Thomas Aquinas. 

485-4. RENAISSANCE AND RATIONALIST POLITICAL THEORIES. A 
study of the important political theories from the Renaissance to the 
end of the eighteenth century, including the theories of Machiavelli, 
Hobbes, Rousseau, Locke and Burke. (Same as Government 485.) 

486-4. CONTEMPORARY POLITICAL THEORIES. (Same as Government 
486.) 

487-4. AMERICAN POLITICAL IDEAS. (Same as Government 487.) An his- 
torical study of the political ideas of leading American statesmen and 
publicists, and their resulting influence upon our government system. 

490-2 to 4. SPECIAL PROBLEMS. Hours and credits to be arranged. Courses 
for qualified seniors and graduates who need to pursue certain topics 
further than regularly titled courses permit. Special topics announced 
from time to time. Students are invited to suggest topics for individual 
study and papers or for group study. Consent of instructor in all cases 
required. 



Science and Technology 

Division 



Applied Science; Astronomy; Biological Science; Botany; Chemis- 
try; Mathematics; Physics; Physiology; and Zoology. 

The Science and Technology Division offers a program designed to ex- 
pand the student's knowledge and understanding of mathematics, basic 
scientific principles, and engineering applications. Every effort is made to 
stimulate the student's curiosity and implement his creativeness, thus 
enabling him to lead a more productive life and be a more useful member 
of the academic, industrial, or business community. 

Professor Kermit G. Clemans, Ph.D. (Oregon) 1959 

Professor Robert N. Pendergrass, Ph.D. (Virginia Poly. Inst.) 1962 

Professor William C. Shaw, Ph.D. (Iowa State) 1959 

Professor Eric A. Sturley, Ed.D. (Columbia) 1958 

Associate Professor Marinus P. Bardolph, Ph.D. (Iowa) 1957 

Associate Professor Myron C Bishop, M.A. (Ohio State) 1958 

Associate Professor Harold E. Broadbooks, Ph.D. (Michigan) 1957 

Associate Professor Harry D. Brown, Ph.D. (Columbia) 1961 

Associate Professor Laurence R. McAneny, Ph.D. (Kansas) 1957 

Associate Professor William J. Probst, Ph.D. (Iowa) 1958 
Assistant Professor George R. Arnold, 

M.S. (Illinois) (on leave, 1962-63) 1953 

Assistant Professor Ralph William Axtell, Ph.D. (Texas) 1960 

Assistant Professor William C. Bennewitz, Ph.D. (Illinois) 1960 

Assistant Professor Richard R. Boedeker, Ph.D. (St. Louis) 1962 

Assistant Professor Joseph S. Davis, Ph.D. (Iowa) 1959 

Assistant Professor Ray Gwillim, M.S. (Illinois) 1957 

79 



80 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

Assistant Professor Deborah T. Haimo, A.M. (Radcliffe) 1961 

Assistant Professor Donal G. Myer, Ph.D. (Ohio State) 1958 

Assistant Professor Clellie Oursler, Ph.D. (Illinois Inst, of Tech.) 1959 

Assistant Professor Irwin H. Parrill, Ph.D. (Iowa) 1958 

Assistant Professor David G. Rands, Ph.D. (Iowa) 1959 

Assistant Professor Kermit O. Ratzlaff, Ph.D. (California) 1962 

Assistant Professor Robert B. Rutledge III, Ph.D. (St. Louis) 1962 

Assistant Professor J. Edmund White, Ph.D. (Indiana) 1959 

Assistant Professor Lloyd Kenneth Williams, Ph.D. (California) 1961 

Instructor Florence A. Fanning, M.A. (Illinois) 1957 

Instructor Donald Q. Harris, M.A. (Missouri) 1958 

Instructor Lyman S. Holden, M.A. (Ohio State) 1958 

Instructor Paul H. Phillips, M.S. (Southern Illinois) 1959 

Instructor Frederick W. Zurheide, M.S. (Southern Illinois) 1958 



Visiting Professor Joseph Mayer, Ph.D. (Columbia) 1961-62 

Lecturer Jane Broadbooks, M.A. (Washington University) 1961-63 

Lecturer Hsiao-shu Hsiung Chang, Ph.D. (Cincinnati) 1962-63 

Lecturer Ivan S. Cliff, Ph.D. (Mass. Inst. Tech.) 1961-63 

Lecturer Daniel D. Cronin, M.S. (St. Louis) 1961-62 

Lecturer Robert Dale Stallard, M.S. (Arkansas) 1961 

Lecturer Tso Pin Wang, M.S. (Southern Illinois) 1959-63 

Lecturer Dan J. Welling, B.S. (Rockhurst) 1962 



DIVISIONAL REQUIREMENTS 

Candidates for the Bachelor of Arts degree concentrating in any of 
the disciplines in the Science and Technology Division must meet the fol- 
lowing requirements: 

1. At least 48 hours of credit in one area of concentration with the grade 
of C or higher in each course in the area (Specific courses, to be included 
in a particular concentration, are listed in the curriculum.); 

2. At least 9 hours of credit in the area of concentration in courses num- 
bered above 299 must be earned at Southern Illinois University within the 
two years preceding the completion of requirements for the degree. 

Upon the completion of 80 hours of college credit, each student in the 
division must file a tentative program with his adviser in the division. 

If a candidate for the Bachelor of Science in Education degree selects an 
area of concentration which is in the Science and Technology Division, then 
he must have at least 48 (or 36 if he also has two 27-hour concentrations 
in other areas) hours in that area with the grade of C or higher in each 
course. Such a student may qualify for a concentration in biological science 



SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY DIVISION 81 

by taking concentrations of 36 hours in botany or zoology, 27 hours in the 
other, and 27 hours in physical science. 

A secondary concentration in physical science includes at least 27 hours 
of credit with courses in astronomy and mathematics and is granted only 
to persons who are taking the biological-science concentration. For such a 
program, written approval of the Science and Technology Division is re- 
quired. 

A secondary concentration for a student in the Science and Technology 
Division must include at least 27 hours of credit. Specific requirements, if 
any, are listed under the heading Secondary Concentration in the particular 
discipline. 



APPLIED SCIENCE 

At the present time, courses in applied science and engineering on the 
Edwardsville Campus are limited to minimum requirements for a pre-engi- 
neering program. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

101-3. ENGINEERING DRAWING I. Orthographic projection, sections and 
conventions, dimensioning, auxiliary views, freehand lettering and 
sketching, and use of instruments. 

205-3. ENGINEERING DRAWING II. A continuation of 101. Auxiliary views, 
threads, and fasteners, dimensioning, working drawings, intersections 
and developments, and charts and graphs. Prerequisite: 101. 

206-4. DESCRIPTIVE GEOMETRY. Graphical solution of problems involving 
the understanding of the space relationships of points, lines, and planes; 
intersections and developments. Prerequisites: 101, Mathematics 112. 

260-3. ANALYTICAL MECHANICS (STATICS). Resultants of force systems, 
algebraic and graphical conditions of equilibrium of force systems; anal- 
ysis of forces acting on members of trusses, forces due to friction; cen- 
troids. Prerequisites: registration in Mathematics 151 and Physics 297. 

261-3. ANALYTICAL MECHANICS (DYNAMICS I). Displacement, velocity, 
and acceleration of a particle; translation, rotation; plane motion. (Kine- 
matics). Prerequisite: 260. 

262-3. ANALYTICAL MECHANICS (DYNAMICS II). Solutions using the 
principles of force, mass and acceleration, work and energy, and impulse 
and momentum. (Kinetics). Prerequisite: 261. 

263-4. SURVEYING I. Use and care of surveying instruments. Fundamental 
principles of surveying, computations, land surveying, topographic sur- 
veying. Two hours lecture, six hours laboratory. Prerequisites: 101, 
Mathematics 112 or equivalent. 

264-4. SURVEYING II. Topographic surveying, field astronomy, route survey- 
ing, introduction to photogrammetry. Two hours lecture, six hours lab- 
oratory. Prerequisite: 263. 



82 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

300-3. THERMODYNAMICS I. The study of fundamental energy concepts 
and the laws of thermodynamics, availability of energy, properties of 
gases, vapors and gas-vapor mixtures, flow and non-flow processes. Pre- 
requisites: Mathematics 253, Physics 299. 

301-3. THERMODYNAMICS II. Engine cycles and applications to internal 
combustion engines, gas turbines, steam turbines, jet devices, air com- 
pressors, and air engines. Combustion, refrigeration and air conditioning. 
Heat transfer principles. Prerequisite: 300. 

302-3. HEAT TRANSFER. Dimensional analysis and its application to the 
theory of heat transfer. Mathematical and graphical methods of analyz- 
ing problems in conduction, convection, and radiation. Particular at- 
tention to the applications of heat transfer principles used in various 
processes. Prerequisite: 301. 



ASTRONOMY 

COURSE DESCRIPTION 

201-4. INTRODUCTION TO ASTRONOMY. Uses of astronomy, reference 
systems, time, instruments, solar and galactic systems and satellites. In- 
cludes evening observations in addition to lecture-demonstrations. 



BOTANY 

Students considering a botany concentration are urged to consult with 
botany faculty representatives. 

SUGGESTED CURRICULA 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

General Studies Requirements (See page 7. Waive GSA 151, 152, 

153.) 87 

Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements (See page 9.) (15) 

Science and Technology Division Requirements (See page 80.) 

Botany Concentration Requirements 69 

General Studies Area A 251, 253 (6) 

Botany 101, 202, 310, 320 20 

Botany electives 28 

Chemistry 111, 112, 113 15 

Physics 6 

German or Russian is recommended as the language. 

Secondary Concentration Requirement 27 

Electives 9 

Total 192 



BOTANY 83 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 

For this degree in the Education Division, the Botany Concentration 
Requirements are as listed above, under the Bachelor of Arts degree. 



SECONDARY CONCENTRATION 

The minimum botany concentration is 27 hours, including 101, 202, 
310, and botany electives. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

101-5. GENERAL BOTANY. An introductory study of the morphology, anat- 
omy, and physiology of the seed plants including vegetative and sexual 
reproduction. Field Studies. Three lecture and four laboratory hours per 
week. 

131-5. FIELD BIOLOGY. A course in methods of identification of various plants 
and animals and location of source material suitable for teaching nature 
study. Primarily for those planning to teach in primary and rural 
schools. Five Saturday field trips and laboratory studies. Approximate 
cost: $5. 

202-5. GENERAL BOTANY. A study of representative plants of the major 
plant groups; classification; evolution of the plant kingdom. Three lec- 
ture and four laboratory hours per week, and one all-day (required) 
field trip. Cost: about $5. Prerequisite: 101. 

203-5. TAXONOMY OF LOCAL SEED PLANTS. A study of the principles of 
classification and the use of manuals, with reference to local ferns and 
flowering plants. Three lecture and four laboratory hours per week. Cost: 
about $5. Prerequisite: 101 or 202. 

225-5. CELLULAR PHYSIOLOGY. A discussion with laboratory illustration 
of basic physiological processes. Generally, plant materials will be used 
in the laboratory. Three lecture and four laboratory hours per week. 
Prerequisite: 101, organic chemistry. 

310-5. PLANT ANATOMY. An introduction to cell division, development, and 
maturation of the structures of the vascular plants. Three lecture and 
four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: 101, 202. 

315-3. PLANT GENETICS. A general course involving principles of evolution 
and heredity. Prerequisite: 101 or 202 or GSA 251 or consent of instruc- 
tor. 

320-5. ELEMENTS OF PLANT PHYSIOLOGY. A study of the functions of 
plants and their relation to the various organs. Three lecture and four 
laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: 101, 202. 

321-3. ELEMENTARY BOTANICAL MICROTECHNIQUE. Methods of pres- 
ervation and preparation of plant materials for examination by the light 
microscope. One lecture and four laboratory hours per week. Prerequi- 
site: consent of instructor. 

325-5. METABOLISM. Intermediary metabolism of plants and animals with 
emphasis upon the newer knowledge. Laboratory organization will be 
adapted to the student's area of concentration (physiology, agriculture, 



84 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

medicine, etc.). Three lecture and four laboratory hours per week. Pre- 
requisite: 101, organic chemistry. 

350-4. PLANTS IN RELATION TO MAN. A study of the basic relationships 
of plants to man; the history, geography, crop ecology, production, con- 
sumption, and uses of plants and plant products of economic importance. 

390-2 to 4. READINGS IN BOTANY. A course of individually assigned read- 
ings in classical botanical literature; both oral and written reports re- 
quired; open only to undergraduate students. Prerequisites: concentration 
in botany, consent of instructor. 

39 1-2 to 5. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN BOTANY. Individual laboratory or field 
work under supervised direction. Both written and oral discussions re- 
quired; open only to undergraduate students. Prerequisite: concentration 
in botany, consent of division. 

403-3. HISTORY AND PRINCIPLES OF PLANT TAXONOMY. Important 
concepts in plant classification through the ages, and study of the Inter- 
national Code of Botanical Nomenclature. Consideration of the func- 
tions of genetics, evolution, morphogenesis, and ecology in taxonomy. 
Prerequisite: 203 or consent of instructor. May be repeated. 

404-5. THE ALGAE. A study of the structure, development, and relationships 
of the algae. Three lecture and four laboratory hours per week. Prereq- 
uisite: 101, 202. 

405-5. THE FUNGI. A study of the structure, development, and relationships 
of the fungi. Problems of economic and scientific interest stressed. Three 
lecture and four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: 101, 202. 

413-5. COMPARATIVE STRUCTURE OF PLANTS. Comparative studies of 
representative groups of vascular plants, including origin, structure, de- 
velopmental tendencies, empryology, and fossil evidence. Three lecture 
and four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: 101, 202. 



CHEMISTRY 

Anyone considering a concentration in chemistry is urged to consult 



wi 



th a representative of the chemistry faculty. 



SUGGESTED CURRICULA 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

General Studies Requirements (See page 7. Waive GSA 151, 152, 

153.) 87 

Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements (See page 9.) (15) 

Science and Technology Division Requirements (See page 80.) 

Chemistry Concentration Requirements . 97-111 

Chemistry 111, 112, 113, 336, 337, 338-4 or 490-2, 341, 

342, 343, 375-3, 46 1 , 462, 463 54 

Students who desire to qualify as professional chemists 
should add 10 hours from 311, 396, 412, 432, 446 10 



CHEMISTRY 85 

Mathematics 111, 112, 150, 151, 252, 253 28 

Physics 297, 298, 299 15 

German or Russian is recommended as the language 
For professional chemists: one additional physics course 4 

Secondary Concentration Requirements (27) 

Electives 0-8 

Total .192-198 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION DEGREE 

For this degree in the Education Division, a 37-hour concentration for 
students who also have two secondary concentrations must include Chem- 
istry 111, 112, 113, 336, 337, 341, 342, 460. German or Russian is recom- 
mended as the foreign language. Candidates with only one secondary con- 
centration must take 1 1 additional hours including 343. 

SECONDARY CONCENTRATION 

A secondary concentration in chemistry includes 111, 112, 113, and at 
least 12 quarter hours in courses chosen from 336, 337, 341, 342. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

111-5, 112-5. CHEMICAL PRINCIPLES AND INORGANIC CHEMISTRY. 
Three lecture, one quiz, and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequi- 
site: high school algebra and geometry or equivalent. 

113-5. INORGANIC AND QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS. Continuation of 112. 
Theory of qualitative identification of the cations. Three lecture and six 
laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: 112. 

240-4. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. A survey course not open to those concentrat- 
ing in chemistry. An introduction to aliphatic and aromatic compounds 
with emphasis on those of biological importance. Three lecture and three 
laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: GSA 153. 

311-3. INTERMEDIATE INORGANIC CHEMISTRY. Modern inorganic 
chemistry involving atomic structure, chemical bonds, complexes and 
chelate structures, and chemistry of familiar and less familiar elements. 
Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisite: 27 hours of chemistry. 

336-4, 337-4, 338-4. ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY. Theories and methods of 
qualitative detection of ions and volumetric and gravimetric quantita- 
tive analysis are treated as an integrated subject. Emphasis on ionization, 
equilibrium, and solubility theories. Two lecture and six laboratory hours 
per week. Prerequisite: 113. 

341-4. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per 
week. Prerequisite: 113. 

342-5, 343-5. ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. Three lecture and six laboratory hours 
per week. Prerequisite: 341. 



86 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

375-0 to 3. SENIOR SEMINAR. One lecture hour per week. Prerequisite: sen- 
ior standing. 

396-2 to 6. SENIOR RESEARCH. Investigation of a chemical problem and prep- 
aration of a thesis under the direction of a staff member. Prerequisite: 
senior, concentrating in chemistry, 4.0 average in chemistry, and consent 
of faculty. 

412-4. INORGANIC PREPARATIONS. A study of several important types of 
inorganic syntheses. One lecture and six laboratory hours per week. Pre- 
requisite: 337, 343. 

432-4. INSTRUMENTAL ANALYTICAL TECHNIQUES. Theory and prac- 
tice of common instrumental analytical measurements. Two lecture and 
six laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: 337, 461. 

446-4. QUALITATIVE ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. Separation and identification 
of organic compounds by classical methods. Two lecture and six lab- 
oratory hours per week. Prerequisite: 343. 

460-5. THEORETICAL CHEMISTRY. A one-quarter course on the traditional 
aspects of physical chemistry without the requirement of calculus. Four 
lecture and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: 337, 342, and 
one year of physics or consent of instructor. 

461-4, 462-4, 463-4. PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY. Three lecture and three labora- 
tory hours per week. Prerequisite: 337, 343, Math 253, Physics 299. 

490-2. CHEMICAL LITERATURE. A study of the various sources of chemical 
information and the techniques for searching the literature. Two lecture 
hours per week. Prerequisite: 337, 343, reading knowledge of German 
or Russian or consent of instructor. 

496-2 to 4. CHEMICAL PROBLEMS. Investigation of problems under the direc- 
tion of a staff member. Prerequisite: senior, concentrating in chemistry 
with 4.0 average, and consent of faculty. 



MATHEMATICS 

Anyone considering a concentration in mathematics is urged to consult 
with a representative of the mathematics faculty. 



SUGGESTED CURRICULA 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

General Studies Requirements (See page 7. Waive GSA 151, 152, 

153.) 87 

Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements (See page 9.) (15) 

Science and Technology Division Requirements (See page 80.) 

Mathematics Concentration Requirements 63-76 

Mathematics background for entering 300 0-37 

Mathematics 300, 320, 321 10 

Mathematics 452 and 453, or 480 and 481, or two geometry 
courses above 299 6 



MATHEMATICS 87 

Mathematics (additional courses above 299) 8 

Physics 297, 298, 299 15 

Recommended: French, German, or Russian 

Secondary Concentration Requirements 27 

Electives 2-15 

Total . 192 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION DEGREE 

For this degree in the Education Division, a student with one secondary 
concentration has the Mathematics Concentration Requirements listed 
above, exclusive of Physics 298, 299, and totaling 48 hours. A student with 
two secondary concentrations must have 36 hours in approved mathematics 
courses, including 300, 311, 320. Physics 297 is required. French, German, 
or Russian is recommended as the language. 



SECONDARY CONCENTRATION 

A secondary concentration in mathematics includes courses through 
253; 300 and 320 are recommended. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

Students who have taken college preparatory mathematics and who 
rank high on the mathematics placement examination should normally 
enroll in 150 at their first college course in mathematics. Students with less 
preparation who plan to concentrate in a discipline of the Science and 
Technology Division should enroll in 112, 111, or 100 as advised by a 
representative of the mathematics faculty. 

100-0. ELEMENTARY MATHEMATICS. Remedial and review work in ele- 
mentary mathematics, including arithmetic and beginning algebra. 

111-5, 112-5. ELEMENTARY ANALYSIS I, II. Beginning sequence for students 
in mathematics, pre-engineering, etc., who cannot qualify for 150. In- 
cludes topics selected from sets, logic, real number system, college alge- 
bra, and trigonometry. Prerequisite: three semesters of high school alge- 
bra and satisfactory score on placement test. 

150-5, 151-5. CALCULUS AND ANALYTICAL GEOMETRY I, II. Beginning 
course for students in mathematics, pre-engineering, etc. Includes topics 
selected from analytic geometry, elementary differential calculus, and 
elementary integral calculus. Prerequisite: college preparatory mathe- 
matics in high school and high score on placement examination, or 112. 

210-4. THE TEACHING OF ELEMENTARY MATHEMATICS. A profes- 
sional treatment of the subject matter of arithmetic methods and a 
study of trends and current literature on the teaching of arithmetic. For 



88 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

elementary education concentrations only. Prerequisite: 111 or GSD 157. 

220-4. ELEMENTARY STATISTICS. A basic introduction to the simpler prob- 
lems of statistical inference. Descriptive statistics, probability distribu- 
tions estimation of parameters and tests of significance, and regression 
and correlation. Prerequisite: 111 or GSD 157. 

252-4, 253-4. CALCULUS AND ANALYTICAL GEOMETRY III, IV. Contin- 
uation of 151. Includes differential and integral calculus, applications, 
introduction to solid analytic geometry, infinite series. Prerequisite: 151. 

300-4. THE REAL NUMBER SYSTEM. An axiomatic study of the real num- 
ber system by use of modern logic and elementary set theory. Prerequi- 
site: 253 or concurrent enrollment. 

305-3, 306-3. DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS I, II. Classical methods of solv- 
ing ordinary differential equations including Laplace transform tech- 
niques. Prerequisite: 253 or concurrent enrollment, Physics 299. 

311-3. THE TEACHING OF SECONDARY MATHEMATICS. A study of the 
nature and objectives of the secondary mathematics curriculum. Partic- 
ular attention is given to the means of introducing new ideas into the 
high school program. For students preparing to be certified teachers of 
secondary mathematics. Prerequisite: 320, Secondary Education 315. 

313-4. SOLID ANALYTIC GEOMETRY. Prerequisite: 150. 

320-3, 321-3, 322-3. FUNDAMENTAL CONCEPTS OF ALGEBRA I, II, III. 
Introduction to abstract algebraic structures, including groups, rings, and 
fields. Attention is given to classical theory of numbers and polynomials. 
The second course is devoted to a study of matrices, including an inves- 
tigation of simultaneous linear systems. Prerequisite: 300 or concurrent 
enrollment. 

324-3. VECTOR ANALYSIS. Prerequisite: 253, Physics 297. 

335-3, 336-3. CONCEPTS OF GEOMETRY I, II. An elementary introduction 
to various geometric systems to acquaint the student with the interrela- 
tionship between geometries of current interest. Topics include axiom 
systems, introduction to synthetic projective and analytic projective ge- 
ometry, projective definition of coordinate systems, affine geometry, Eu- 
clidean geometry, and non-Euclidean geometry. Prerequisite: 300 or 
concurrent enrollment. 

395-2 to 8. READING IN MATHEMATICS. Supervised reading in selected sub- 
jects. Prerequisite: 12 hours of 300- or 400-level mathematics, 4.0 aver- 
age in mathematics, and consent of division. 

400-3. HISTORY OF MATHEMATICS. Prerequisite: 252 or consent of instruc- 
tor. 

408-3. BOUNDARY VALUE PROBLEMS. Characteristic functions, orthogonal 
functions, self-adjoint equations, and certain partial differential equa- 
tions of physics. Prerequisite: 306. 

410-3, 411-3, 412-3. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS I, II, III. An introduction to 
the principles and techniques of statistical inference. Elements of prob- 
ability theory. Population, sample and sampling distributions. Estima- 
tion and testing hypotheses on means and variances. Analysis of enumer- 
ation data. Regression and correlation. Analysis of variance and covari- 
ance. Nonparametric Methods. Topics in experimental design. For stu- 
dents in fields using statistical methods. Will not normally be counted 
on a mathematics concentration. Prerequisite: 111 or GSD 157. 

415-4. NON-EUCLIDEAN GEOMETRIC PRINCIPLES. An introduction to 



MATHEMATICS 89 

hyperbolic and elliptic plane geometry and trigonometry. Emphasis given 
to the nature and significance of geometry and the historical background 
of non-Euclidean geometry. Prerequisite: 252. 

425-3. THEORY OF NUMBERS. Topics in elementary number theory, in- 
cluding properties of integers and prime numbers, divisibility, Diophan- 
tine equations, and congruence of numbers. Prerequisite: 151. 

430-4. PROJECTIVE GEOMETRY. Introduction to the fundamental concepts 
of projective geometry, including study of conies and polar systems of 
conies. Prerequisite: 151. 

433-3. THEORY OF POINT SETS. Prerequisite: 300. 

446-4. THE STRUCTURE OF ELEMENTARY SCHOOL MATHEMATICS. 
A course to assist experienced elementary school teachers in extending 
their understanding of mathematics. This course may not be taken for 
credit after credit has been received for 447 and does not count for credit 
toward a mathematics concentration. Prerequisite: experience in ele- 
mentary teaching and consent of instructor. 

447-4. THE STRUCTURE OF SECONDARY SCHOOL MATHEMATICS. A 
course to assist experienced secondary school teachers in extending their 
understanding of mathematics. This course may not be taken for credit 
after credit has been received for 446 or 311 and does not count toward 
a mathematics concentration. Prerequisite: experience in secondary 
teaching and consent of instructor. 

452-3, 453-3, 454-3. ADVANCED CALCULUS. A precise presentation of the 
fundamental concepts of analysis, i.e., limits, continuity, differentiation, 
integration. Major topics include partial differentiation, vector analysis, 
Riemann-Stieltjes integrals, infinite series, and improper integrals. Pre- 
requisite: 300 or concurrent enrollment. 

455-4. PROGRAMMING FOR DIGITAL COMPUTERS. An intensive course 
in digital computer programming. Topics include computer organization 
and characteristics; machine language coding; flow charts, sub-routines; 
optimum and symbolic coding; compilers and interpretive systems. Pre- 
requisite: consent of instructor. 

460-4. MODERN GEOMETRY. Advanced topics in Euclidean geometry by 
the synthetic method. Topics including the nine-point circle, Simson 
line, theorems of Ceva and Menelaus, coaxal circles, harmonic section, 
poles and polars, similitude, and inversion. Prerequisite: 20 hours of col- 
lege mathematics. 

475-3. NUMERICAL METHODS. An introduction to approximation methods 
including finite differences and interpolation; numerical differentiation 
and integration; curve fitting, numerical solution of algebraic, tran- 
scendental, and differential equations. Prerequisites: 305, or 253 and con- 
sent of instructor. 

480-3, 481-3, 482-3. PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS. An introduction to 
probability theory and the mathematical methods used in obtaining 
procedures for various problems of statistical inference. Topics include 
the algebra of probabilities, discrete and continuous distributions, limit 
theorems, sampling distributions, principles of statistical estimation, and 
testing hypotheses. Prerequisite: 253. 



90 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



PHYSICS 

Students desiring concentration in physics are urged to consult with 
the physics faculty representatives. 



SUGGESTED CURRICULA 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

General Studies Requirements (See page 7. Waive GSA 151, 152, 

153.) 87 

Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements (See page 9.) (15) 

Science and Technology Division Requirements (See page 80.) 

Physics Concentration Requirements 72-100 

Physics 297, 298, 299, 300, 301, 302 28 

Physics electives, including 4 hours lab, to complete 48 

hours 20 

Mathematics, 9 hours beyond 253 9-37 

Chemistry 111, 112, 113 15 

German or Russian is recommended. 

Secondary Concentration Requirements (27) 

Electives 0-21 

Total 192-205 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION DEGREE 

For this degree in the Education Division, the Physics Concentration 
Requirements are as listed above, under Bachelor of Arts Degree, except 
that 6 hours in the history and philosophy of science may be counted 
toward the physics electives. 

A physics concentration for a student with two secondary concentra- 
tions must include Physics 297, 298, 299, 300, 301, 302, 8 additional hours 
in physics courses above 299, Chemistry 113, Mathematics 253. German or 
Russian is recommended as the foreign language. 



SECONDARY CONCENTRATION 

A secondary concentration in physics includes 297, 298, 299, 300, and 
electives to total 27 hours. 



PHYSICS 91 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

103-4. PROBLEMS IN ELEMENTARY PHYSICS. Prerequisites: GSA 152, 
Mathematics 112. 

297-5, 298-5, 299-5, 300-5. UNIVERSITY PHYSICS I, II, III, IV. A basic 
sequence in physics for science, pre-engineering, and mathematics stu- 
dents. Includes: I, Mechanics; II, Heat, Sound, and Light; III, Electricity 
and Magnetism; and IV, Modern Physics. Prerequisite: Mathematics 151, 
252, 253 or concurrent enrollment. 

301-4, 302-4. MECHANICS. Intermediate mechanics using vector notation. 
Emphasis on kinematics and particle dynamics. Prerequisites: 297 and 
Mathematics 324, or concurrent enrollment. 

305-4, 306-4. INTRODUCTION TO ELECTRIC THEORY I, II. Electrostatic 
fields in vacuum and in matter, electromagnetic fields and induction, 
linear circuits with direct and alternating currents, and electromagnetic 
radiation. Prerequisites: 299, Mathematics 324. 

307-2. ELECTRIC MEASUREMENTS. A laboratory course illustrating basic 
electrical and magnetic properties and emphasizing precision in their 
measurement. Prerequisite: 306 or concurrent enrollment. 

309-4. ELECTRON CIRCUITS. Electron tube and transistor circuit principles 
and applications. Three lecture and three laboratory hours per week. 
Prerequisite: 299. 

310-4. LIGHT. Light propagation and optical instruments: reflection, refrac- 
tion, interference, diffraction, and polarization of light. Prerequisite: 300. 

311-1. OPTICS LABORATORY. Advanced experiments in geometrical and 
physical optics. Two laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: 310 or con- 
current enrollment. 

320-3, 321-3. HEAT I, II. I, a macroscopic study; heat phenomena, and ther- 
modynamics. II, a microscopic study; kinetic theory and statistical me- 
chanics. Prerequisite: 298; Mathematics 253. 

415-4, 416-4, 417-4. MODERN PHYSICS I, II, III. Elements of wave mechan- 
ics, atomic and nuclear physics, fundamental particles, superconductiv- 
ity, and solid state. Prerequisite: 300; 9 hours of mathematics numbered 
300 or above. 

418-1 to 4. MODERN PHYSICS LABORATORY. Experiments in modern phys- 
ics. Prerequisite: 415 or concurrent enrollment and consent of instructor. 

420-2 to 5. SPECIAL PROJECTS I. Each student is assigned a definite inves- 
tigative topic. Adapted to advanced undergraduate students. Prerequi- 
sites: 301, 305, 306. 

430-2. PHYSICAL LITERATURE. A study of source materials in the field of 
physics. Also library search on special projects. Prerequisite: integral 
calculus, three advanced physics courses. 



PHYSIOLOGY 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



209-5. INTRODUCTION TO PHYSIOLOGY. A survey of the functions of the 
human body. Designed for students in various fields desiring a basic but 



92 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

comprehensive knowledge of human physiology. Three lectures and 
four laboratory hours per week. 

300-4. HUMAN ANATOMY. Lectures and demonstrations of bones, joints, 
muscles, and nerves. Designed for concentrations in physical education. 

315-5, 316-5, 317-5. ADVANCED COLLEGE PHYSIOLOGY. The lectures 
emphasize mammalian and human physiology whereas the laboratory 
involves function throughout the vertebrate classes. Three lecture and 
four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: GSA 252. 

433-4. COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY. Fundamental physiological processes 
and the manner in which they vary in various groups of animals. Rec- 
ommended for students in physiology and other biological sciences. 
Three lecture and two laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: Chem- 
istry 113, Zoology 102, 103. 



ZOOLOGY 

Students planning to concentrate in zoology should consult with the 
zoology faculty representatives. 

SUGGESTED CURRICULA 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

General Studies Requirements (See page 7. Waive GSA 151, 152, 

153.) 87 

Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements (See page 9.) (15) 

Science and Technology Division Requirements (See page 80.) 

Zoology Concentration Requirements 74 

General Studies Area A 251, 252 (6) 

Botany (one course) 5 

Chemistry 111, 112, 113 15 

Physics (6 hours) 6 

Physiology (one course above 300) 4 

Zoology 102, 103, 202, 300, 382A, 382B, 382C, 401 26.5 

Zoology 303, 306, 404, 408, 461 (any one) 4 

Electives above 300 to complete 48 hours in zoology 13 

Secondary Concentration Requirement 27 

Electives 6 

Recommended: organic chemistry, three quarters of physics, 
three of botany, and three of mathematics 

Total 192 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION DEGREE 

For this degree in the Education Division, the Zoology Concentration 



ZOOLOGY 93 



Requirements are as listed above, under Bachelor of Arts Degree, except 
that teachers in in-service training may include 402 or 403 instead of the 
one course from 303, 306, 404, 408, 461. Recommended electives are also 
as listed above. 



SECONDARY CONCENTRATION 

A secondary concentration in zoology includes 100, 102, 103, one lab- 
oratory course above the 100-level and additional hours to total 27. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

100-5. PRINCIPLES OF ANIMAL BIOLOGY. Introduction to the major prin- 
ciples of biology, including classification, organization of matter into 
cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems, heredity, ecology, distribution, 
organic evolution, economic biology, and conservation. Three lecture and 
four laboratory hours per week. 

102-5. GENERAL INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY. Studies of representatives of 
the various kinds of invertebrate animals. Relationships, structure, and 
natural history are emphasized. Two lecture and six laboratory hours per 
week. Prerequisite: 100 or GSA 252. 

103-5. GENERAL VERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY. Studies of representatives of 
the various kinds of vertebrate animals, with special emphasis on the 
amphibian type. Evolutionary development, structure, and natural his- 
tory are emphasized. Two lecture and six laboratory hours per week. 
Prerequisite: 100 or GSA 252. 

202-5. COMPARATIVE ANATOMY. Comparative studies of the organ systems 
of vertebrate animals, with emphasis on the phylogeny and evolution 
of these organs. Two lecture and six laboratory hours per week. Pre- 
requisite: 103. 

300-5. VERTEBRATE EMBRYOLOGY. Development of the individual with 
the frog, chick, and pig as types. Two lecture and six laboratory hours 
per week. Prerequisite: 202. 

303-4. GENERAL ORNITHOLOGY. Natural history, identifications, and tax- 
onomic groups of birds. Cost of field trips may be $5 to $10 per student. 
Two lecture and four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: 100 or 
GSA 252. 

306-4. ENTOMOLOGY. Principles of the structure, classification, and life his- 
tories of insects. Two lecture and four laboratory hours per week. Pre- 
requisite: 102. 

310-5. ANIMAL ECOLOGY. Habitats, communities, and population dynamics 
of animals. Cost of field trips may be $5 or $10 per student. Three lec- 
ture and four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: 102, 103. 

313-3. EVOLUTION. Principles and processes of the evolution of living things, 
including the development of present-day man. Prerequisite: one year of 
biology. 

314-4. HEREDITY AND EUGENICS. Principles of heredity in relation to 
man. Prerequisite: 100 or Botany 101. 

321-5. HISTOLOGICAL TECHNIQUE IN ZOOLOGY. Methods of preparing 



94 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

material for microscopic study. Two lecture and six laboratory hours per 
week. Prerequisite: one year of biological sciences or consent of instruc- 
tor. 

322-2 to 5. PROBLEMS IN ZOOLOGY. Research on zoological problems. Pre- 
requisite: 4.25 grade-point average, senior standing, and consent of the 
faculty. (Credit may not be used toward a secondary concentration in 
zoology.) 

382A-i/ 2 , 382B-i/ 2 , 382C-i/ 2 . ZOOLOGY SEMINAR FOR SENIORS. Required 
each quarter of seniors concentrating in zoology. Prerequisite: one year of 
biological sciences. 

401-5. GENETICS. Principles of inheritance, including genetic mechanisms, 
mutation, and selection. Two lecture and six laboratory hours per week. 
Prerequisite: 12 hours of biological science and consent of instructor. 

402-4. NATURAL HISTORY OF INVERTEBRATE ANIMALS. Observation, 
identification, and life histories. Designed for teachers. Not for students 
specializing in invertebrate zoology. Two lecture and four laboratory 
hours per week. Prerequisite: one year of zoology. 

403-4. NATURAL HISTORY OF VERTEBRATE ANIMALS. Observation, 
identification, and life histories. Designed for teachers. Not for students 
specializing in vertebrate zoology. Two lecture and four laboratory hours 
per week. Prerequisite: one year of zoology. 

404-4 to 8. ZOOLOGY FIELD STUDIES. An extended trip of four to eight 
weeks to study animals in various environments. Arrangements made 
spring term. Costs per individual will be approximately $25 per week. 
(4 hours may be used for undergraduate credit and 4 hours for graduate 
credit.) Prerequisite: consent of faculty. 

406-4. PROTOZOOLOGY. Taxonomy, cytology, reproduction, and physiology 
of unicellular animals. Laboratory methods of culturing and studying. 
Two lecture and four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: one year 
of zoology. 

407-5. PARASITOLOGY. Collection of parasitic animals, identification, mor- 
phology, life history, and control measures. Two lecture and six labora- 
tory hours per week. Prerequisite: 102. 

408-4. HERPETOLOGY. Taxonomic groups, identification and natural his- 
tory of amphibians and reptiles. Cost of field trip may be $5 to $10 per 
student. Two lecture and four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: 
one year of zoology. 

461-4. MAMMALOGY. Taxonomic groups, identification, and natural history of 
mammals. Two lecture and four laboratory hours per week. Prerequi- 
site: 103. 

480-3. ZOOGEOGRAPHY. Concepts and principles relating to patterns of 
animal distribution on a continental and world-wide basis. Prerequisite: 
103 or consent of instructor. 



Social Sciences Division 



Anthropology; Geography; Government; History; Public Admin- 
istration and Planning; Sociology 

The Social Sciences Division offers courses designed to enable the student 
to achieve an understanding and appreciation of civilization viewed in 
historical perspective, and to gain, through the various social sciences disci- 
plines, an awareness of the society of which he is a part and of his role in 
it. His studies give him insights and understandings which enable him to 
live more constructively with others in his family, community, and nation 
and provide him with a better understanding of social organizations, tech- 
nologies, and the nature and variety of human beliefs and attitudes. 

Professor Hyman H. Frankel, Ph.D. (Illinois) 1957 

Professor William Goodman, Ph.D. (Ohio State) 1962 

Professor Melvin E. Kazeck, Ed.D. (Columbia) 1958 

Professor Seymour Z. Mann, Ph.D. (Chicago) 1960 

Professor Herbert H. Rosenthal, Ph.D. (Harvard) 1955 

Associate Professor Robert B. Campbell, Ph.D. (Wisconsin) 1962 

Associate Professor Robert F. Erickson, Ph.D. (Illinois) 1959 

Associate Professor Kurt Glaser, Ph.D. (Harvard) 1959 

Associate Professor S. D. Lovell, Ph.D. (Ohio State) 1957 

Associate Professor Allan J. McCurry, Ph.D. (Cornell) 1960 

Associate Professor Gunter W. Remmling, Ph.D. (Berlin) 1958 

Associate Professor Patrick W. Riddleberger, Ph.D. (California) 1960 

Associate Professor Elliott M. Rudwick, Ph.D. (Pennsylvania) 1960 

Associate Professor John W. Snaden, Ph.D. (Michigan) 1959 

Associate Professor Donald L. Taylor, Ph.D. (Duke) 1959 

Associate Professor Jack Bruce Thomas, Ph.D. (Indiana) 1958 

Assistant Professor Sidney L. Cohen, Ph.D. (Yale) 1961 

95 



96 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

Assistant Professor T. Patrick Culbcrt, Ph.D. (Chicago) 1962 

Assistant Professor Martin L. Dosick, A.M. (Boston) 1962 

Assistant Professor Alfonso Gonzalez, Ph.D. (Texas) 1962 

Assistant Professor James M. Haas, Ph.D. (Illinois) 1961 

Assistant Professor Stanley B. Kimball, Ph.D. (Columbia) 1959 

Assistant Professor Noah Lucatz, Ph.D. (Washington University) 1961 

Assistant Professor Warren L. Sauer, Ph.D. (Michigan State) 1962 

Assistant Professor Ernest L. Schusky, Ph.D. (Chicago) 1960 

Assistant Professor Virgil L. Seymour, M.A. (Southern Illinois) 1957 

Assistant Professor Philip E. Vogel, Ph.D. (Nebraska) 1959 

Instructor Richard E. GufTy, M.S. (Northwestern) 1960 

Instructor Clare B. Jarard, M.A. (Iowa) 1957 

Instructor Eleanor Anne Schwab, A.M. (New York) 1961 

Instructor James Struif, LL.B. (Illinois) 1960 



Lecturer D. Noel Brooks, M.A. (Louisiana State) 1961-63 

Lecturer Carmen W. Harper, M.A. (Southern Illinois) 1960-63 

Lecturer Jane Ann Schusky, M.A. (Chicago) 1961-63 

Lecturer Nedra Reames, M.A. (Southern Illinois) 1962-63 

Lecturer Delores J. Williams, A.M. (Chicago) 1962-63 



DIVISIONAL REQUIREMENTS 

Candidates for the Bachelor of Arts degree who concentrate in one of 
the disciplines in the Social Sciences Division must complete one course in 
either philosophy or psychology (or a General Studies equivalent in these 
fields). They must also complete one year of a college-level foreign-language 
sequence or the equivalent. 



ANTHROPOLOGY 

A secondary concentration in anthropology consists of twenty-seven 
hours including 300-4, 310-4, and 409-4. English 400-4, Structural Lin- 
guistics, may be counted as part of the concentration. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

110-4. WAYS OF MANKIND. Anthropology as a science and a profession. 
Survey of human origins, prehistory, world ethnography. The signifi- 
cance of anthropology in the world today. 



ANTHROPOLOGY 9? 

300-4. MAN'S PLACE IN NATURE. Man as a biological being, his relation- 
ships to other living things, human origins and development, the con- 
cept of race and races of mankind, human genetics, and normal human 
variation. 

304-4. THE ORIGINS OF CIVILIZATION. The conditions that produced the 
early high culture of both Old and New Worlds. A study of the complex 
environmental and cultural factors that led to the rise and fall of early 
civilizations. 

308-4. PEOPLES AND CULTURES OF THE OLD WORLD. The varieties 
of people and customs in Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Pacific Islands. 
The biological and cultural history of man in the Old World from the 
earliest known times to the present day. 

310-4. MAN AND CULTURE. The nature of culture and cultural process. The 
interrelationships between culture and man as an individual and as a 
group, with emphasis on the cultural point of view as an aid in under- 
standing human actions and reactions in the world today. 

314-4. INDIANS OF NORTH AMERICA. A survey of North American In- 
dian cultures as they have existed within historic times. 

409-4. ANTHROPOLOGY AND MODERN LIFE. The uses of anthropology 
in the present-day world. How the anthropologist aids the administrator, 
businessman, government official, and other specialists. 

470-4. SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY. Theory and method in community study; 
functional analysis, cultural themes and values in both primitive and 
modern cultures. 



GEOGRAPHY 

In the field of geography, the student may work toward either a Bache- 
lor of Science in Education degree or a Bachelor of Arts degree depending 
upon his objective: 

1. Bachelor of Science in Education — for preparation to teach geography 
in the elementary or secondary schools, or (with further preparation) in the 
junior college; or as a part of preparation to teach either social science or 
physical science in the elementary or secondary schools. 

2. Bachelor of Arts — for a thorough knowledge of geography, in prepara- 
tion for civil service appointment as a geographer, or for demands of private 
organizations requiring the services of geographers, meteorologists, or car- 
tographers. 

SUGGESTED CURRICULA 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

General Studies Requirements (See page 7.) 96 

Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements (See page 9.) (15) 

Geography Concentration Requirements 45 



98 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

Geography 101, 210 or 21 1, 212, 310, 312, 314 24-25 

Geography electives (324 and 416 are recommended. 

GSB 151-3 may be counted.) 21-20 

(One year of a foreign language is required.) 

Secondary Concentration Requirements 24-27 

Electives 24-27 

Total 192 

Students planning to obtain employment in cartography must have 
at least one year of college mathematics. 

Persons who expect to teach in elementary school are urged to take at 
least a secondary concentration in geography which must include 101, 
Physical Geography. 

Those expecting to teach high school commercial or economic geog- 
raphy with a minimum of preparation must have 12 hours of college geog- 
raphy. Students should meet this requirement by taking 210 or 211, 324, 
and 405. 

Those expecting to teach high school physical geography with a mini- 
mum preparation must have 18 hours in college physical geography. Stu- 
dents should meet this requirement by taking 101, 212, 310, and any other 
physical geography subjects. 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION DEGREE 

For this degree in the Education Division, Geography Concentration 
Requirements include 101, 210, 212, 310, 312, 314, 324, and additional 
courses to complete 48 or 36 hours in geography (depending On whether 
the student has one secondary concentration or two). Additional courses 
recommended are 343, 416. General Studies Area B 151-3 may be counted 
toward the required number of hours. 



SECONDARY CONCENTRATION 

A secondary concentration in geography consists of 27 hours and must 
include 101. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

100-5. CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY. A world survey course which stresses man's 
relationship to his physical environment. Designed to provide an under- 
standing of the people of the world and their work as related to the land 
and its resources. Satisfies social studies requirement. 



GEOGRAPHY 99 

101-5. PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY. A study of the earth's physical surface, the 
areal differences and relationships of its landforms, water resources, soils, 
natural vegetation, and economic minerals. World distribution patterns 
of physical elements, their relationships to each other, and their im- 
portance to man. Meets needs of prospective teachers of nature study and 
natural, social, and general science. Field trip and laboratory work. 

210-4. ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY. A study of economic production types or 
occupations, such as grazing, fishing, farming, lumbering, mining, man- 
ufacturing, and transportation. 

211-5. ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY. Designed to show the relationship between 
physical environment and the economic life of people. Emphasis on eco- 
nomic-geographic factors of world distribution of resources, methods of 
production, and transportation of important commodities of industry and 
commerce. For students of business administration and economics. 

212-3. MAP READING AND INTERPRETATION. Properties of maps and 
air photos, their uses and sources. Maps as means of expression in sci- 
entific investigation. Units on the use and interpretation of maps, map 
symbols, and map projections. Laboratory. 

310-4. METEOROLOGY. Study of weather, and the factors and conditions in- 
fluencing it, its importance to man. Emphasis placed on agriculture, 
aviation, business, industry, and everyday understanding of weather. 
Most recent findings in weather science studies. Of value to persons in- 
terested in weather bureau service. Prerequisite: GSB 151 or equivalent. 

311-4. GEOGRAPHY OF SOILS. The nature, source, and origin of soil mate- 
rial; soil development and soil use. Geographic distribution and sig- 
nificance of soil as an element of the environment. Prerequisite: 101 or 
consent of instructor. 

312-4. REGIONAL CLIMATOLOGY. Principles of climatology; physical bases 
for the differentiation of climatic types; description and interpretation 
of climatic regions. Prerequisite: GSB 151 or equivalent. 

313-3. GEOGRAPHY OF ILLINOIS. Acquaints the student with the regional 
concepts of our state, the distribution of climate, vegetation, soil, land- 
forms, and mineral resources; interrelates agriculture, manufacturing, 
industry, and population distribution, interpreted within a regional 
framework. Prerequisite: GSB 151 or equivalent. 

314-4. GEOGRAPHY OF ANGLO-AMERICA. A systematic regional treatment 
of North America, north of Mexico. An introduction to a regional study 
of geography. Prerequisite: GSB 151 or equivalent. 

315-4. GEOGRAPHY OF EUROPE. An intensive study of regions, with stress 
on their description, interpretation, and utilization. Emphasis on inter- 
dependence of political units. Prerequisite: GSB 151 or equivalent. 

316-4. GEOGRAPHY OF SOUTH AMERICA. A study of the regions and re- 
sources of the South American countries as they are related to national 
and international problems. Prerequisite: GSB 151 or equivalent. 

318-4. GEOGRAPHY OF ASIA. A study of the countries of Asia, except the 
Asiatic portion of the U.S.S.R., emphasizing the relationship between the 
problems of the population and the resource base. Prerequisite: GSB 151 
or equivalent. 

319-4. HISTORICAL GEOGRAPHY OF THE UNITED STATES. Study of 
elements of the geographic environment that have been important in the 
discovery, exploration, settlement, and development of the United States. 



100 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

321-2. GEOGRAPHY OF AUSTRALIA. A study of the only continent which 
lies far beyond the periphery of the land hemisphere; its unusual cli- 
matic and economic conditions; its importance in the British Empire; 
and its vital place in the economic and political life of the Pacific. Pre- 
requisite: GSB 151 or equivalent. 

322-3. GEOGRAPHY OF THE PACIFIC. Description and analysis of the com- 
plex physical and cultural structure of the Pacific islands composing 
Melanisia, Micronesia, and Polynesia. Emphasis will be placed upon 
the strategic significance of the area. 

323-3. GEOGRAPHY OF THE NEAR EAST. A regional approach to the study 
of the nations of southwest Asia and the Arab nations of Africa. Ap- 
praisal of the resources of these nations and the importance of these areas 
to the rest of the world. Prerequisite: GSB 151 or equivalent. 

324-4. RESTORATION AND CONSERVATION OF THE NATURAL RE- 
SOURCES. Survey of major resources of the United States with stress 
on problems of conservation and restoration. Emphasis on water, min- 
eral, forest, grass, soil, wildlife, scenic, and recreational resources. Field 
trips. 

343-4. TEACHING OF GEOGRAPHY. Presentation and evaluation of geog- 
raphy teaching methods. Geographic literature, illustrative materials, 
and teaching devices are emphasized. 

402-4. THE SOVIET UNION. A study of the U.S.S.R. based on both a sys- 
tematic and a regional approach. Appraisal of the natural-resource base 
of Russia as well as an estimate of her industrial and agricultural 
strength. Prerequisite: GSB 151 or equivalent. 

404-4. ADVANCED ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY I (AGRICULTURAL). A 
functional study of the bases, interrelationships, and geographic distribu- 
tion of agricultural production. Prerequisites: GSB 151, 210 or 211, or 
consent of instructor. 

405-4. ADVANCED ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY II (INDUSTRIAL). A func- 
tional study of the bases, interrelationships, and geographic distribution 
of industries. Prerequisites: GSB 151, 211, or consent of instructor. 

406-4. TRADE AND TRANSPORTATION. The pattern of modern transport 
networks and trade routes; the importance of trade routes; the impor- 
tance of trade and transportation as geographic factors. Prerequisite: 
GSB 151, 211, or consent of instructor. 

411-4. URBAN GEOGRAPHY. The urban population: environment, develop- 
ment, and distribution; geographic factors related to the origin, structure, 
and functions of urban centers. Prerequisites: GSB 151, 211, or consent 
of instructor. 

413-3 to 4. GEOGRAPHY OF THE CARIBBEAN LANDS. A regional ap- 
proach to the study of the lands bordering the Caribbean. Appraisal of 
the natural-resource base of the various countries. Prerequisite: GSB 151 
or equivalent. 

416-4. CARTOGRAPHY. Instruction and practice in the basic techniques of 
map-making; consideration and solution of problems involved in the 
construction of maps; problems in map reproduction. Prerequisite: 212. 

417-3. AIR PHOTO INTERPRETATION. Techniques in the use of air photos 
as source material for research in the physical and social sciences. Lab- 
oratory. Prerequisite: 212 or consent of instructor. 

420-4. GEOGRAPHY OF AFRICA. A regional approach to the study of the 



GEOGRAPHY 101 

continent. Patterns of climate, soils, minerals, vegetation, and relative 
location to be woven together with the agricultural, economic, and in- 
dustrial features into the regional framework of Africa. Prerequisite: 
GSB 151 or equivalent. 
424-4. REGIONAL PROBLEMS IN CONSERVATION. The distribution, use, 
and interrelationship of the resources in the various resource manage- 
ment regions of the United States, the conservation techniques applied 
to them, and the problems of public policy in their effective manage- 
ment. Prerequisites: GSB 151, 324, or equivalent. 
430-4. PHYSIOGRAPHIC PROVINCES OF NORTH AMERICA. Designed to 
give the students an appreciation of the evolution of land forms in the 
physiographic provinces of North America; to explain the surface fea- 
tures in a landscape; and to interpret the human drama related thereto. 
Prerequisite: 314. 
435-4. GEOGRAPHY OF LANDFORMS. The use of various geographic aids in 
the development of landform concepts. Descriptions of the more common 
landforms with special emphasis on the United States. Research paper 
required. Prerequisite: 212. 
440-2 to 4. READINGS IN GEOGRAPHY. Supervised readings in selected sub- 
jects. Hours and credit to be arranged. 
444_4. POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY. An examination of the world political pat- 
tern that is superimposed on the physical earth. Particular attention to 
world powers and critical areas. Prerequisite: GSB 151 or equivalent. 
450-3 to 15. TRAVEL STUDY COURSES. Designed chiefly for in-service 
teachers and for others whose work needs enrichment through travel. 
Prior to departure from campus, intensive supervised study and/or read- 
ings relative to areas or countries to be visited. Written report due within 
six weeks after completion of study in the field. Not open for credit to 
graduate students in geography. Prerequisite: 100 or equivalent. 
470A-4. PLANNING CONCEPTS AND METHODS. (Same as Government 
470A.) An introduction to the planning processes, stressing the physical 
aspects. Lectures, discussions, demonstrations and laboratory sessions 
covering historical background of planning; planning methods including 
land use studies and special distribution of functions in the urban area 
and region; research methods in planning; introduction to .design ele- 
ments; and instruments for plan implementation. Prerequisite: consent 
of instructor. 
470B-4. PLANNING ADMINISTRATION AND THE PLANNING FUNC- 
TION IN THE PUBLIC POLICY PROCESSES. (Same as Government 
47 0B.) The study of the planning process as it relates to public policy 
formulation and implementation processes. Particular emphasis will be 
given to the urban government setting and to emerging regional ar- 
rangements Will examine problems in planning administration, fiscal 
planning, the coordinative role of planning and land use controls. Pre- 
requisite: consent of instructor. 
470C-4. FIELD PROBLEMS IN URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING. 
(Same as Government 470C.) Principally designed as a workshop where 
problems would be pursued by the student on an individual or group 
basis. Topics for investigation would be selected to serve the student's 
competence and interest in the sociological, economic, administrative, 
design or general political aspects of the planning process. Problems 



102 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

selected would be related to this bi-state metropolitan area as a natural 
laboratory and would be tied, wherever feasible or desirable, to on-going 
current area studies. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 



GOVERNMENT 

A concentration in government is recommended for persons planning 
to teach civics or government courses, and for those planning to qualify 
for the study of law or for the public service. 



SUGGESTED CURRICULA 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

General Studies Requirements (See page 7.) 96 

Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements (See page 9.) (15) 

Government Concentration Requirements 45 

A minimum of 45 hours including 210 and at least one course 
(but no more than 20 hours) in each of the five areas of 
specialization listed below. 

Secondary Concentration Requirements 24-27 

Electives 24-27 

Total 192 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION DEGREE 

For this degree in the Education Division, the Government Concentra- 
tion Requirements include 48 or 36 hours (including 210) in government 
depending on whether the student has one secondary concentration or two. 
At least one course (but no more than 20 hours) should be taken in each 
of the areas of specialization listed below. 

AREAS OF SPECIALIZATION 

American Government and Politics 232, 330, 340, 379, 380, 

406,415,420,435. 
Public Law 305, 315, 495, 496. 

Public Administration 360, 361, 362, 461, 465, 470, 473. 
International Affairs 243, 370, 371, 373, 390, 391, 453, 456, 457. 
Political Theory 484, 485, 486, 487. 

SECONDARY CONCENTRATION 

A secondary concentration is 27 hours and must include 210. 



GOVERNMENT 103 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

210-4. AMERICAN GOVERNMENT. A general survey of national, state, and 
local governments. Includes the national and state constitutional prin- 
ciples as required by Illinois law. 

232-4. STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT. A survey of the structure and 
functions of American state and local governments. Prerequisite: 210 
or equivalent. 

243-3. INTRODUCTION TO AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY. The signifi- 
cance of foreign policy as related to American citizens. Prerequisite: 210 
or equivalent. 

305-4. DEVELOPMENT OF THE AMERICAN CONSTITUTION. The evo- 
lution of the United States constitutional system. Recommended for pre- 
law students. Prerequisite: 210 or equivalent. 

315-3. ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE. The organization and work of the 
American judicial system. Recommended for pre-law students. Prereq- 
uisites: 210 or equivalent. 

321-1 to 6. READINGS IN GOVERNMENT. Consent of instructor required. 

330-2. ILLINOIS GOVERNMENT. The development and functioning of gov- 
ernment in Illinois. Prerequisite: 210 or equivalent. 

340-3. THE LEGISLATIVE PROCESS. A study of the principles, organization, 
and work of American legislative bodies. Prerequisite: 210 or equivalent. 

360-4. INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION. Nature of public 
administration in the United States, basic administrative practices, the 
peculiar governmental systems; major issues in public administration. 
Prerequisite: 210 or equivalent. 

361-3. SELECTED PROBLEMS IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION AND 
POLICY FORMULATION. Intensive examination of problem areas il- 
lustrating administrative and management practices in public service 
and demonstrating linkages between politics and administration in our 
political system. Prerequisite: 360. 

362-4. PUBLIC PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION. An analysis of some of 
the central problems encountered by the government executive in re- 
cruiting, maintaining, and developing personnel, such as political neu- 
trality, leadership and motivation, career development, security regula- 
tions, and the role of personnel in policy planning and execution. Pre- 
requisite: 210 or equivalent. 

370-4. INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS. A study of world politics— the causes 
of international conflict and the conditions of peace. Prerequisite: 243. 

371-4. PROBLEMS OF AMERICAN FOREIGN POLICY. An analysis of se- 
lected problems in the field of American foreign policy. Prerequisite: 243. 

373-3. INTERNATIONAL POLITICS OF EUROPE. Nation-state system in 
Europe; foreign politics of major states; nationalism as a source of con- 
flict; Soviet expansionism; progress toward European security and unifica- 
tion. Prerequisite: 370. 

379-3. THE DEVELOPMENT OF POLITICAL PARTIES. A study of the his- 
torical development of American political parties. Prerequisite: 210 or 
equivalent. 



104 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

380-4. POLITICAL PARTIES. An analysis of contemporary American political 
parties. Prerequisite: 210 or equivalent. 

390-5. PRINCIPLES OF COMPARATIVE AND FOREIGN GOVERN- 
MENTS. A comparative study of the various political systems of Euro- 
pean democracies and governmental systems derived therefrom. Prereq- 
uisite: 210 or equivalent. 

391-3. COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT. A comparative study of the political 
systems of the Soviet Union, the West German Republic, Italy, and at 
least one other European state. Prerequisite: 390. 

406-4. AMERICAN CHIEF EXECUTIVE. President and governor. A study of 
the origin and background of the presidency and the governorship; quali- 
fications, nomination and election, succession and removal, the organiza- 
tion of the executive branch and the powers and functions of the presi- 
dent and governor. Prerequisite: 210 or equivalent. 

415-3. POLITICAL BEHAVIOR. An analysis of the nature of public opinion 
and methods of influencing political behavior. Major attention given to 
studying basic psychological attitudes and behavior. Prerequisite: 210 or 
equivalent. 

420-3. PRESSURE GROUPS AND PROPAGANDA. An analysis of interest 
groups and their techniques of political propaganda. Prerequisite: 210 
or equivalent. 

435-4. GOVERNMENT AND BUSINESS. General survey of regulation of 
business by government; regulatory measures and procedures; regulation 
of labor and agriculture; public ownership; impact of pressure groups on 
government. Prerequisite: 210 or equivalent. 

453-3. SOVIET GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS. An intensive study and re- 
search exercise in the government and politics of the Soviet Union. Pre- 
requisite: 390 or consent of instructor. 

456-4. GREAT BRITAIN AND THE BRITISH EMPIRE. An intensive study 
and research exercise in the governments and politics of the British 
Commonwealth of Nations. Prerequisite: 390 or consent of instructor. 

457-4. GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS IN THE NEAR AND MIDDLE 
EAST. Iran, Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Egypt, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, etc. Pre- 
requisite: 210 or equivalent. 

461-4. ORGANIZATIONAL THEORY AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION. 
Examination of sociology of organizations, the significance of bureaucracy 
and large scale organizations, administrative theories and their applica- 
tion and relevance to public administration. Prerequisite: 360 or con- 
current registration with 360. 

465-3. LOCAL GOVERNMENT AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION. Prob- 
lems and issues at local governmental level. Emphasizes administrative 
approaches, special problems in intergovernmental relationships, and the 
developing tasks related to urban expansion. Prerequisite: 360. 

470A-4. PLANNING CONCEPTS AND METHODS. (Same as Geography 
470A.) An introduction to the planning processes, stressing the physical 
aspects. Lectures, discussions, demonstrations and laboratory sessions 
covering historical background of planning; planning methods including 
land use studies and special distribution of functions in the urban area 
and region; research methods in planning; introduction to design ele- 
ments; and instruments for plan implementation. Prerequisite: consent 
of instructor. 



GOVERNMENT 105 

470B-4 PLANNING ADMINISTRATION AND THE PLANNING FUNC- 
TION IN THE PUBLIC POLICY PROCESSES. (Same as Geography 
470B.) The study of the planning process as it relates to public policy 
formulation and implementation processes. Particular emphasis will be 
given to the urban government setting and to emerging regional ar- 
rangements. Will examine problems in planning administration, fiscal 
planning, the coordinative role of planning and land use controls. Pre- 
requisite: consent of instructor. 

470C-4. FIELD PROBLEMS IN URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING. 
(Same as Geography 470C.) Principally designed as a workshop where 
problems would be pursued by the student on an individual or group 
basis. Topics for investigation would be selected to serve the student's 
competence and interest in the sociological, economic, administrative, 
design or general political aspects of the planning process. Problems 
selected would be related to this bi-state metropolitan area as a natural 
laboratory and would be tied, wherever feasible or desirable, to on-going 
current area studies. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

470D-2. SEMINAR: PLANNING IN A FREE SOCIETY. Individual and group 
consideration of a philosophy of planning compatible with a free society. 
Seminar will devote itself to a review of the significant related litera- 
ture and to the consideration of the contributions and limitations of 
planning as an element in public decision-making. (May be taken con- 
currently with 470C.) Prerequisite: 470A and 470B. 

473-3. METROPOLITAN STUDIES AND RESEARCH. Examination of the 
reorganization movement related to improvement and restructuring of 
government in metropolitan areas. Review and evaluation of special 
problems in research methodology. Prerequisite: 360 or 465 or consent of 
instructor. 

484-4. ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL POLITICAL THEORIES. (Same as Phi- 
losophy 484.) A study of outstanding political theories of the ancient 
and medieval periods, including theories of Aristotle, Plato, Cicero, St. 
Augustine, and Thomas Aquinas. Prerequisite: 6 hours of government. 

485-4. RENAISSANCE AND RATIONALIST POLITICAL THEORIES. (Same 
as Philosophy 485.) A study of the important political theories from the 
Renaissance to the end of the Eighteenth Century, including the theories 
of Machiavelli, Hobbes, Rousseau, Locke, and Burke. Prerequisite: 6 
hours of government. 

486-4. CONTEMPORARY POLITICAL THEORIES. (Same as Philosophy 
486.) A study of the important political theories since 1800, including 
the theories of Marx, Hegel, and John Stuart Mill. Prerequisite: 6 hours 
of government. 

487-4. AMERICAN POLITICAL IDEAS. (Same as Philosophy 487.) An his- 
torical study of the political ideas of leading American statesmen and 
publicists, and their resulting influence upon our governmental system. 
Prerequisite: 6 hours of government. 

495-4. CONSTITUTIONAL LAW I. A study of the constitutional law of the 
United States with emphasis on cases dealing with the framework of our 
federal system. Prerequisite: 210 or equivalent. 

496-4. CONSTITUTIONAL LAW II. A study of the constitutional law of the 
United States with emphasis upon cases dealing with the framework of 
American liberties. Prerequisite: 210 or equivalent. 



106 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



HISTORY 

Students who intend to concentrate in history should consult with a 
member of the history faculty at the time of registration. Formal declaration 
of a concentration in history should not be made before the end of the 
sophomore year. Students are urged to complete their General Studies pro- 
gram as soon as possible in order to concentrate on history during the junior 
and senior years. 

SUGGESTED CURRICULA 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

General Studies Requirements (See page 7.) 96 

Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements (See page 9.) (15) 

History Concentration Requirements 39 

General Studies Area B 152, 153 (6) 

History 101, 201, 202, 452 14 

History electives above 299 (Anthropology 304 may be 
counted) to complete 45 hours (including GSB 152, 153) 
distributed as evenly as possible among Ancient-Medie- 
val-Asiatic, Modern European, and American history. 21 
Philosophy 200 4 

Secondary Concentration Requirements 24-27 

Electives 30-33 

Total 192 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION DEGREE 

For this degree in the Education Division, the History Concentration 
Requirements are 48 hours or 36 hours depending on whether the student 
has one secondary concentration or two. Requirements for either concen- 
tration are 101, 201, 202, 452, GSB 152, 153, and Philosophy 200. The 
remaining portion of the concentration must be on the 300 and 400 levels 
and care should be taken to distribute the work as evenly as possible 
among the three fields of Ancient-Medieval-Asiatic, Modern Europe, and 
American history. A year of work in a foreign language is required. 

SECONDARY CONCENTRATION 

Twenty-seven hours are required for a secondary concentration in 



HISTORY 107 

history and must include 101, 201, 202, GSB 152, 153. Anthropology 304 
may be counted for a history concentration. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

101-3. SURVEY OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION. Designed primarily for 
freshmen as a study of the development and evolution of early western 
civilization. Course 101 covers material from the ancient period to a.d. 
1000. 

201-4. THE UNITED STATES TO 1865. A general survey of the political, 
social, intellectual, and economic development of the United States to 
1865. Includes national and state constitutional principles as required 
by Illinois law. Required of all students concentrating in history. 

202-4. THE UNITED STATES SINCE 1865. Continuation of 201. Either 201 
or 202 to count toward graduation requirements in education. Required 
of all students concentrating in history. 

304-3. HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT NEAR EAST. Political, social, and re- 
ligious history from the earliest times to the 4th Century b.c. Prereq- 
uisite: 101 or equivalent. 

306-3. HISTORY OF ROME. Political, social, economic, and cultural develop- 
ments from the Etruscan period to the fall of the Empire in the West. 
Prerequisite: 101 or equivalent. 

308-3. HISTORY OF ILLINOIS. Political, social, economic, and cultural his- 
tory of the state from 1818 to the present. Recommended for prospective 
teachers. Prerequisites: 201 and 202. 

309-4. THE NEGRO IN AMERICA. The role of the Negro in America from 
the seventeenth century to the present with emphasis on the period since 
1865. Prerequisite: 201 or 202. 

312-4. CENTRAL EUROPE IN THE NINETEENTH CENTURY. An anal- 
ysis of the rise of nationalism with emphasis on Germany and Italy and 
of the problems of the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy. Prerequisites: GSB 
152 and 153. 

314-4. THE AGE OF ABSOLUTISM AND THE ENLIGHTENMENT. An ex- 
amination of the major developments in European history from 1648 to 
1789. Prerequisites: GSB 152 and 153. 

322-4, 323-4, 324-4. ENGLISH HISTORY. A study of the institutional and 
cultural development of the English people from the earliest times to the 
present. 322: Celtic Britain to 1603; 323: 1603-1815; 324: since 1815. 
Prerequisites: 101, GSB 152, and 153. 

330-4. THE REVOLUTION AND THE CONSTITUTION. A detailed exam- 
ination of the period 1763 to 1789 in United States history. Prerequisite: 
201. 

332-4. MEDIEVAL HISTORY. An intensive study of the early Middle Ages. 
The processes of Romanization, Germanization, and Christianization 
will be discussed in detail. Special investigations will be made of the 
Migration Period, Byzantine Civilization and of the Islamic cultures 
of the Medieval Near East. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. 

333-4. MEDIEVAL HISTORY. Medieval Western Europe from the end of the 
Viking Era until the beginning of the Renaissance in Italy will be dis- 



108 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

cussed in detail, and particular attention given to the economic prob- 
lems of the late Middle Ages. Technological advances, the rise of uni- 
versities, Church-State relations, and medieval literature will be em- 
phasized. Prerequisite: History 311 or permission of instructor. 

338-3. HISTORY OF GREECE. A detailed analysis of Hellenic history from 
the Homeric period to the end of the Peloponnesian War. A thorough 
examination of the elements of classical culture will be included. Pre- 
requisite: sophomore standing. 

339-3. HISTORY OF GREECE. A thorough analysis of Greek society in the 
period 401-133 b.c. The career of Alexander the Great and the fortunes 
of the Hellenistic Successor Kingdoms will be examined in detail. Spe- 
cial emphasis will be placed on the intellectual achievement of the pe- 
riod. Prerequisite: History 304 or consent of instructor. 

352-3. COLONIAL LATIN AMERICA. With a preliminary view of the major 
Indian cultures and the era of discovery and exploration, this survey 
emphasizes the political, economic, social, and cultural aspects of Latin- 
American life through the wars of independence. 

365-4. HISTORY OF CHINESE CIVILIZATION. A survey of the development 
of Chinese civilization from prehistoric times to the present. Prereq- 
uisites: GSB 152 and 153. 

367-3. INTRODUCTION TO FAR EASTERN CIVILIZATION. (Oriental 
Civilization I.) A broad survey of Far Eastern history and culture up to 
the nineteenth century. Prerequisites: GSB 152 and 153. 

368-3. THE FAR EAST AND MODERN IMPERIALISM. Discussion of Far 
Eastern international relations against the background of modern impe- 
rialism, 1800-1941. Prerequisites: GSB 152 and 153. 

369-3. THE CONTEMPORARY FAR EAST. Rise of Communist China; post- 
war problems in the Far East; the cold war; and the problems of new 
nations. Prerequisites: GSB 152 and 153. 

372-4. RUSSIAN HISTORY TO 1905. The Kievan and Muscovite background; 
main currents in Imperial Russia. Prerequisites: GSB 152 and 153. 

373-4. RUSSIAN HISTORY SINCE 1905. Decline and fall of the Russian Em- 
pire, the revolution, and the subsequent development of the Soviet 
Union. Prerequisites: GSB 152 and 153. 

401-4. THE OLD SOUTH. A study of the South from the colonial period to 
the Civil War. Prerequisite: 201. 

402-4. THE NEW SOUTH. A history of the South since 1860. Prerequisite: 
202. 

405-3. CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION. The political and economic 
background of the war, the military aspects of the conflict, and the 
course and consequences of reconstruction. Prerequisites: 201, 202. 

410-2 to 5. SPECIAL READINGS IN HISTORY. Supervised readings for stu- 
dents with sufficient background. Registration by special permission only. 

411-3, 412-3, 413-3. INTELLECTUAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED 
STATES. A study of the economic, social, and political thought that 
has influenced the development of the nation. Prerequisites: 201, 202. 

415-4. THE AGE OF THE RENAISSANCE. The Renaissance in Italy and its 
development in other sections of Europe. Prerequisites: GSB 152 and 153. 

416-4. THE AGE OF THE REFORMATION. An analysis of the period which 
produced the Protestant and Catholic Reformations. Prerequisites: GSB 
152 and 153. 



HISTORY 109 



418-3. ENGLISH CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY. The evolution and func- 
tioning of the English legislative, administrative, and judicial systems 
with an emphasis on the ideas and principles that determined growth 
during each age. Prerequisites: GSB 152 and 153. 

420-4. THE FRENCH REVOLUTION. An intensive study of the period 1789 
to 1815. Prerequisites: GSB 152 and 153. 

425-4. AMERICAN COLONIAL HISTORY. Founding of the American col- 
onies and the development of their institutions to 1763. Prerequisite: 
201. 

428-4. AGE OF JACKSON. Origins, background, and development of that 
phase of American democracy associated with the Jacksonian era. The 
political, social, and economic history of the years 1815-44 will be con- 
sidered in detail. Prerequisite: 201. 

435-3. RECENT UNITED STATES HISTORY. An analysis covering the ma- 
jor problems and trends from the Civil War to 1900. Prerequisite: 202. 

436-3. RECENT UNITED STATES HISTORY. An analysis of the major de- 
velopments in twentieth century America from 1900 to 1929. Prereq- 
uisite: 202. 

437-3. RECENT UNITED STATES HISTORY. Continuation of 436 covering 
the period from 1929 to the present. Prerequisite: 202. 

440-3. AMERICAN DIPLOMACY TO 1898. A general consideration of Amer- 
ican foreign policies. Prerequisites: 201, 202. 

441-3. AMERICAN DIPLOMACY SINCE 1898. Continuation of 440. Prereq- 
uisite: 202. 

450-4. EUROPE SINCE 1914. Political and cultural developments in twentieth 
century Europe with emphasis on international relations. Prerequisites: 
GSB 152 and 153. 

451-3. HISTORIOGRAPHY. Development of history as a written subject, in- 
cluding works and philosophy of the various outstanding historians in 
ancient, medieval, and modern periods. Prerequisites: GSB 152 and 153. 

452-3. HISTORICAL RESEARCH AND THESIS WRITING. A methods 
course in research principles which requires the preparation of a re- 
search paper. Prerequisite: senior standing or consent of instructor. 

454-3. BIOGRAPHY IN AMERICAN HISTORY. Outstanding leaders and 
their contributions to the history of the United States. Attention to 
historical writers who specialize in biography. Prerequisite: a course in 
United States history. 

481-3. ROME: THE EARLY EMPIRE. The civilization of the first two cen- 
turies of the Roman Empire. Against a background of general political 
history, attention is directed to the philosophical schools, pagan re- 
ligions, and other factors affecting the rise and extension of Christianity. 
Prerequisite: 101 or equivalent. 



10 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION AND PLANNING 

Public Administration and Planning is an interdisciplinary concentra- 
tion which focuses around the problems of public administration in today's 
society and emphasizes the basic skills and general educational background 
needed in preparation for a career in public administration and urban and/ 
or regional planning. A student may satisfy all concentration requirements 
by selecting this program which leads to a Bachelor of Arts degree. 

A student enrolled in public administration and planning shall offer 
a minimum of 72 hours distributed in the various disciplines according to 
the pattern given below. 

The combination of hours selected depends on the interest and, to 
some degree, the previous training of the student. In some cases, selected 
courses in disciplines other than those suggested may be substituted for the 
hours recommended. Students enrolled in the program should consult with 
the program adviser in planning their curricula. 

Course problems upon which students may be working in connection 
with several of the required courses will wherever feasible be related to 
research projects being carried on by the Public Administration and Metro- 
politan Affairs Program. 

SUGGESTED CURRICULUM 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

General Studies Requirements (See page 7.) 96 

Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements (See page 9.) (15) 

Public Administration and Planning Concentration Requirements 72 

Economics 330 and one elective 8 

Geography and Government (See required courses below.) 56 
Sociology 335-4 and one elective 8 

Secondary Concentration Requirements (24) 

Electives 24 

Total 192 

Required Courses 

1. Government 232-4, 360-4, 361-3, 465-3, 473-3; 17 
and/or 470 A-4, 470B-4, 470C-4, 470D-2. 14 

2. Geography 101-5, 211-5, 411-4, 416-4; 18 
and/or 470A-4, 470B-4, 470C-4 12 

3. Other government and/or geography courses to yield at least 18 



PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION AND PLANNING 111 

hours in one and 38 in the other. Each of 470A, B, and C may 
count as either geography or government but not both; therefore, 
the maximum total of items 1 and 2 is 49, minimum is 29. 7-27 



SOCIOLOGY 

Sociology offers concentrations for those working for a Bachelor of 
Arts degree and a Bachelor of Science in Education degree. A sociology 
concentration with a specialization in social work is also offered. 

SUGGESTED CURRICULA 

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 

General Studies Requirements (See page 7.) 96 

Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements (See page 9.) (15) 

Sociology Concentration Requirements 53 

Anthropology (one course) 4 

Psychology (one course) 4 

Sociology 101, 308 (or Mathematics 220 or 410), 312, 321, 

405, 451 23 

Sociology electives to complete 45 hours 22 

A background course in physical anthropology is also rec- 
ommended. 

Secondary Concentration Requirements 24-27 

Electives 16-19 

Total 192 

Social Work 

General Studies Requirements (See page 7.) 96 

Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements (See page 9.) (15) 

Sociology Concentration Requirements 66 

Anthropology, economics, psychology (one course in each) 12 

Government (two courses in the area of American national, 
state, and local government) 9 

Sociology 101, 102, 308 (or Mathematics 220 or 410), 321, 
340, 380, 481, 482 32 

Sociology electives 11 

Secondary Concentration Requirements 24-27 

Electives 3-6 

Total 192 



112 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION DEGREE 

For this degree in the Education Division, the Sociology Concentration 
Requirements include 101, 102, 321, 333, 340, 374, and sociology electives 
to complete 48 or 36 hours depending on whether the student has one or 
two secondary concentrations. One (but not two) secondary concentration 
should be in another social science. 

SECONDARY CONCENTRATION 

A secondary concentration in sociology consists of 27 hours and may 
include GSB 251, 252, and 253. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

101-4. INTRODUCTORY SOCIOLOGY. Scientific study of human society 
and the various means by which individuals and groups adjust to each 
other and to their physical and social environment. 

102-4. SOCIAL PROBLEMS. An analysis of selected contemporary social prob- 
lems in their social and cultural setting such as crimes, suicide, mental 
illness, the vices, family disorganization, with emphasis upon their ex- 
tent and significance. 

241-4. MARRIAGE AND PARENTHOOD. The social psychology of dating, 
courtship, and family relations; evaluation of research findings; problems 
of applying scientific principles to changing overt behavior. 

306-4. SOCIAL CONTROL. The means and principles of social controls; so- 
cial institutions as factors in control; techniques of directing social ac- 
tion. Prerequisite: 101. 

308-3. STATISTICS FOR SOCIAL SCIENCE. Methods and application of 
statistics in the social sciences. Statistical methods in demography, ec- 
ology, testing and guidance, social problems. Examination of empirical 
studies in these and related areas. Prerequisite: junior standing or con- 
sent of instructor. 

312-4. SOCIOLOGICAL RESEARCH. Part played by research in the develop- 
ment of sociology as a science. Application of scientific method to social 
data. Types of research. Prerequisite: 101. 

320-4. RACE AND MINORITY GROUP RELATIONS. Racial and cultural 
contacts and conflicts, causes of prejudice; status and participation of 
minority groups; national and international aspects of minority prob- 
lems. 

321-4. SOCIALIZATION OF THE INDIVIDUAL. The process of socialization 
in infancy, childhood, and adolescence; development of habits; attitudes, 
sentiments; emergence of the self; integration of the individual and 
society. Prerequisite: 101. 

322-4. PROPAGANDA AND PUBLIC OPINION. Techniques and characteris- 
tics of propaganda; methods of measuring public opinion. Prerequisite: 
101. 

332-4. SOCIAL ORGANIZATION. An examination of the determinants of so- 



SOCIOLOGY 113 



cial organization; intensive analysis of institutional configurations, social 
stratification, and systems of social control; review of significant writing. 
Prerequisite: 101. 

333-4. COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION. Factors involved in community or- 
ganization; types, aims, and objectives; community diagnosis; individual 
case study of specific community. Prerequisite: 101. 

335-4. URBAN SOCIOLOGY. The rise, development, structure, culture, plan- 
ning, and problems in early and modern cities. Prerequisite: 101. 

338-4. INDUSTRIAL SOCIOLOGY. Social organization and processes within 
the formal and informal structure of the industrial unit; research and 
experimental materials concerning social determinants of morale, status, 
and role of the worker. Prerequisite: 101. 

340-4. THE FAMILY. The family in historic and contemporary society; evolu- 
tion of the modern family; changes in family functions, structures, and 
roles. Prerequisite: 101. 

351-4. SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION. Function of religious institutions in so- 
ciety and their relationship to other major social institutions; role in 
social control and group solidarity. Prerequisite: 101. 

371-4. POPULATION AND MIGRATION. Characteristics of population, 
problems of growth, composition, distribution differential fertility, in- 
ternational and internal migration. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

372-4. CRIMINOLOGY. The nature of crime; criminal statistics; causal factors; 
theories and procedures in prevention and treatment. Prerequisite: con- 
sent of instructor. 

373-4. JUVENILE DELINQUENCY. Nature of juvenile delinquency; factors 
contributing to delinquent behavior; treatment and prevention. 

374-4. SOCIOLOGY OF EDUCATION. Methods, principles, and data of soci- 
ology applied to the school situation; relation of the school to other in- 
stitutions and groups. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

380-4. INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WORK. The historical development, 
philosophy, and theory forming the basis for the professional practice of 
social work; processes developed and the specialists within each of them; 
personal and educational requirements for the career opportunities avail- 
able. Prerequisite: 101. 

388-3. WORKSHOP IN INTER-GROUP RELATIONS. Designed to provide 
theoretical and practical understanding of cultural, social, and psycho- 
logical factors associated with inter-group tension. Participants concen- 
trate their efforts on problem-solving activities related to their occupa- 
tional, professional, or civic interests. Resource and consultative staff 
from the academic areas of education, psychology, sociology, and social 
work. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 

396-1 to 5. READINGS IN SOCIOLOGY. Supervised reading in selected sub- 
jects. Prerequisite: consent of division head. 

405-4. CURRENT SOCIOLOGY. A survey of important trends in contempo- 
rary social thought. Students read, report on, and evaluate content of 
leading sociological journals. Prerequisite: 12 hours of sociology. 

406-4. SOCIAL CHANGE. Processes of social change in the modern world; 
culture lag and conflict of norms; individual and social problems arising 
from conflicting systems of social values and cultural norms. Prerequi- 
site: 101. 

407-4. INTEGRATED SOCIOLOGY. Designed for senior students with a so- 



114 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

ciology major. Integration of sociological concepts and principles: society 
and culture, the human group, social norms and patterns, status and 
roles, organization, structure and function, and social change. Prerequi- 
site: 15 hours of sociology. 

424-4. COLLECTIVE BEHAVIOR. The behavior of people in large groups; 
collective interstimulation and emotions; crowds, audiences, and publics; 
mass stimuli and mass response. Prerequisite: 321 or 322 or consent of 
instructor. 

426-4. SOCIAL FACTORS IN BEHAVIOR AND PERSONALITY. How group 
situations and values affect behavior and shape personality; development 
of concepts, role-concepts, attitudes, values; theories of motivation; self- 
concepts; conflicting social values in relation to individual motivation. 
Prerequisite: 321 or Psychology 305 or consent of instructor. 

427-4. PERSONALITY AND SOCIAL ADJUSTMENT. Basic mechanisms of 
adjustive behavior; concepts and criteria of personal integration and so- 
cial adjustment; varieties of adjustive and non-adjustive behavior; the- 
ories of personal organization and disorganization; selected problems. 
Prerequisite: 321 or Psychology 305 or consent of instructor. 

435-4. SOCIAL STRATIFICATION. A comparative study of social class sys- 
tems, with emphasis on the American systems. Relationships of class po- 
sition to behavior in areas such as family, religion, politics. Prerequisite: 
101. 

450-4. SOCIAL THOUGHT I: BEFORE 1800. Ancient background of Western 
social thought; development of modern social thought. Prerequisite: 
general background in history. 

451-4. SOCIAL THOUGHT II: THE SOCIOLOGICAL MOVEMENT. Rise 
and development of scientific social thought in Western society. Prereq- 
uisite: consent of instructor. 

453-4. SOCIAL MOVEMENTS. A sociological study of modern social move- 
ments; social and cultural backgrounds, forms of expression and organi- 
zation; social structure of social movements, their role and function in 
modern society. Prerequisite: eight hours of sociology. 

472-4. TREATMENT AND PREVENTION OF CRIME. Principles of penol- 
ogy; history of punishment and prisons; criminal law, police function, 
criminal courts; the prison community; the juvenile court and related 
movements. Prerequisite: 372. 

481-4. PROCESSES IN SOCIAL WORK. Theory, rationale, and practice of 
casework, group work, social welfare organization, and the roles of su- 
pervision, administration, and research in relation to each. Case mate- 
rial study and discussion with field observation and practice. Prerequi- 
site: 380 or consent of instructor. 

482-4. SOCIAL WORK IN SELECTED AGENCIES. Study of representative 
literature on casework in family, psychiatric, medical, school, military, 
child welfare, correctional settings, and others. Case material study and 
discussion with field observation and practice. Prerequisite: 481. 

484-4. SURVEY COURSE IN MARRIAGE COUNSELING. Survey and anal- 
ysis of the field of marriage counseling; assessment of current practices 
and techniques in terms of contemporary sociological theory. Prerequi- 
site: consent of instructor. 



Technical and 
Adult Education 



Dean of Technical and Adult Education Ernest J. Simon, 

M.S. (Illinois) 1950 



Supervisor E. R. Casstevens, B.S. (U.S. Naval Academy) 1959 

Assistant Supervisor Dale F. Blount, B.S. (Rockhurst) 1960 

An adult education program consisting of noncredit courses in various 
industrial, technical, and general education fields is offered. 

Adults may register for these courses regardless of educational back- 
ground. Occasionally, prerequisites may be established for specific courses 
because of their nature. The classes cover a wide range of interest and 
activities and are being developed further to meet other needs. 

These courses are taught by University faculty members as well as 
outstanding industrial, professional, and business leaders. The practical, 
functional approach is used. In many instances, the University co-operates 
with groups representing management, labor, and others as well as with 
individual industrial and municipal organizations. Courses are then planned 
and offered to meet the specific needs of these groups. Programs and course 
offerings are announced as they develop. 

REGISTRATION FOR TECHNICAL AND 
ADULT EDUCATION COURSES 

It will be necessary for interested students to preregister for the course 
or courses of their choice in order that arrangements may be made for the 
various sections of classes. The time and place of registration at each loca- 
tion is the subject of special announcement. Interested students should ad- 

115 



116 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

dress the Supervisor, Industrial and Technical Programs, Southern Illinois 
University, Edwardsville, Illinois, for specific information regarding regis- 
tration. 



VETERANS 

A veteran who was a legal resident of Illinois at the time of entrance 
into service may attend under an Illinois Military Scholarship, which will 
satisfy his tuition charge. If the veteran has already been awarded such 
a scholarship by the University, he should bring the award letter with him 
at the time of registration. If he has not been awarded one he should 
furnish a copy of his separation papers showing place of residence at the 
time of entering the service. 

INDUSTRIAL MANAGEMENT PROGRAM 

Started in 1956 in co-operation with the East Side Manufacturers 
Association at Granite City, this program was extended in 1957 to Alton 
in co-operation with the Alton District Manufacturers Association and in 
1959 to East St. Louis in co-operation with East Side Associated Industries. 

It is designed to give present and future foremen and supervisors a 
more complete background of information and skills with which to make 
and carry out on-the-job decisions. All courses are tailored to meet the prac- 
tical problems of management and the needs of the students. 

The program consists of approximately twenty course offerings, com- 
pletion of eight is required for the two-year certificate in industrial manage- 
ment. None of the courses carry degree credit. They need not be completed 
within any specified time. The programs at the three locations, though 
almost identical, differ slightly: The Granite City and East St. Louis 
programs require that five of the eight courses be Practical Psychology for 
Supervisors I, Effective Speaking for Supervisors I, The Supervisor and 
His Job, Industrial Report Writing, and Labor Management Relations or 
Current Labor Law. The Alton program simply requires any eight courses. 

Each program has the advice of a co-ordinating committee made up of 
representatives of industry which approves course offerings, makes adjust- 
ments to meet the specific needs of the area and advises the University 
concerning the planning and promotion of the program. 

IN-PLANT PROGRAMS 

On request by individual industries or other organizations, the Uni- 
versity will prepare special noncredit programs of instruction to be put on 



TECHNICAL AND ADULT EDUCATION 



117 



in-plant. These courses are presented by the University faculty or by out- 
standing consultants in the area. On some occasions courses are presented 
in-plant to night shift people who could not otherwise attend these courses. 
In-plant courses have been particularly effective because they can be tailored 
to the specific needs of the plant or organization involved. At present in- 
plant programs include: 

American Zinc Company Conference Leadership 

Basler Electric Company Industrial Engineering for Foremen 



City of Alton 

Dow Metal Products 

Granite City Engineering Depot 

Granite City Steel Company 



Laclede Steel Company 

Monsanto Chemical Company 

Owens-Illinois Glass Company 

Pet Milk Company 

A. O. Smith Corporation 



Union Starch and Refining Company 

United Steel Workers of America 
Walworth Company 



Training Employees on the Job 

Reading Improvement 

Technical Report Writing 

Coaching and Counseling 

Basic Industrial Metallurgy 

The Supervisor and His Job 

Industrial Report Writing 

Industrial Safety 

Effective Speaking for Supervisors 

Industrial Report Writing 

Reading Improvement 

Reading Improvement 

Advanced English 

English Grammar 

Industrial Report Writing 

Labor-Management Relations 

The Supervisor and His Job 

Conversational Spanish 

Logic 

Leadership for Unions 

Management Practices 



TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT PROGRAM 

This program provides instruction of a technical and specialized nature 
not otherwise available in the area. Instructors are provided who have 
specialized and distinguished themselves in the field being covered. Courses 
may be offered to fill a current need or to help satisfy a continuing need. 

The objective is to prepare candidates for the examination leading to 
certification by the American Society for Traffic and Transportation. The 
examinations will be given at the East St. Louis Center in January and 
June on dates designated by the American Society for Traffic and Transpor- 
tation. 

Courses may be taken at East St. Louis, Alton, or Carbondale. Regis- 



118 



SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



tration for credit courses should be done in the regular manner. Registration 
for noncredit courses will be arranged and announced by Industrial and 
Technical Programs, Edwardsville, Illinois. 



THE COURSES 

Numbered courses carry college credit, unnumbered courses do not. 
To Prepare for Exam A 
Marketing 341-4 Transportation (Prerequisite: 230) 
Rates and Tariffs I 
Rates and Tariffs II 



Marketing 451-4 

Management 170-4 
Government 210-5 
Marketing 230-5 

Economics 205-5 

Geography 211-5 
Management 320-5 

Management 340-4 



To Prepare for Exam B 
Traffic Management (Prerequisite: 341) 

To Prepare for Exam C 

Introduction to Business Administration 

American Government 

Principles of Marketing (Prerequisite: Economics 
205) 

Survey of Economic Principles (Prerequisite: Man- 
agement 170) 

Economic Geography 

Corporation Finance (Prerequisite: Accounting 253, 
Economics 205) 

Business Organization and Management 

To Prepare for Exam D 
Interstate Commerce Law 



Index 



Academic advisement: for freshmen, 6; 
for transfer students, 6; function of, 6 

Academic divisions: business, 11-26; edu- 
cation, 27-51; fine arts, 52-64; humani- 
ties, 65-77; science and technology, 
79-94; social sciences, 95-1 14; technical 
and adult education, 115-118 

Accounting: mentioned, 11, 12; defined, 
12; objectives of program in, 12; areas 
of study in, 13; secondary concentration 
in, 13; curriculum for Bachelor of Sci- 
ence degree in, 13; description of courses 
in, 13-14 

Administration, education: see education 
administration 

Administration, public: see public ad- 
ministration and planning 

Admission to the University: application 
for, 5; University's right to change 
rules regulating, 2 

Advance registration, 6 

Advanced standing assignments in Gen- 
eral Studies, 8 

Advisement, academic: see academic ad- 
visement 

Alton Center: established, 1, 3; location 
of, 2; description of, 3 

Anthropology: mentioned, 95; secondary 
concentration in, 96; description of 
courses in, 96-97 

Applied science: mentioned, 79; descrip- 
tion of courses in, 81-82 

Art: mentioned, 46, 52; curriculum for 
Bachelor of Arts degree in, 53-54; cur- 
riculum for Bachelor of Science in 
Education degree in, 54; secondary con- 
centration in, 54; description of courses 
in, 54-55 

Astronomy: mentioned, 79; description of 
courses in, 82 

Attainment tests, noncredit, in area of 
concentration, 8 

Bachelor of Arts degree: mentioned, 4; 
requirements for, 9; granted by Business 
Division, 12; professional education re- 
quirements for those desiring to meet 
minimum state standards for certifica- 
tion, 47; in Fine Arts Division, 53; in 
music, 55; Humanities Division re- 
quirements for, 66; Science and Tech- 
nology Division requirements for, 80; 
Social Sciences Division requirements 
for, 96; in geography, 97; in public 



administration and planning, 110; in 
sociology, 111 

Bachelor of Arts degree curricula: in 
history, in psychology, 44-45; in art, 
53-54; in music, 55-56; in general 
speech and speech education, 61-62; in 
theater, 62; in English, 68; in foreign 
languages, 72; in botany, 82; in chemis- 
try, 84-85; in mathematics, 86-87; in 
physics, 90; in zoology, 92; in geography, 
97-98; in government, 102; in public 
administration and planning, 110-111; 
in sociology, 111 

Bachelor of Music degree: mentioned, 4, 
55; in Fine Arts Division, 53; curricula 
for, 56-57 

Bachelor of Science degree: in agricul- 
ture, 4; in home economics, 4; men- 
tioned, 4; granted by Business Division, 
12 

Bachelor of Science in Education degree: 
mentioned, 4; in Business Division, 12; 
divisional requirements for, 28; in ele- 
mentary education, 29; in sociology, 
111; in physical education for men, 
36; in physical education for women, 
41-42; in Fine Arts Division, 53; re- 
quirements for in Science and Tech- 
nology Division, 80-81; in geography, 
97 

Bachelor of Science in Education degree 
curricula: in elementary education, 30- 
31; in psychology, 45; in special educa- 
tion, 48; in art, 54; in foreign lan- 
guages, 72; in botany, 83; in chemistry, 
85; in mathematics, 87; in physics, 90; 
in zoology, 92-93; in geography, 98; 
in government, 102; in history, 106; in 
sociology, 112 

Bachelor's degree: granted to preprofes- 
sional students, 4; programs, 4; grade 
point average required for, 6-7; old 
general requirements for, 7; general 
studies requirements for, 7 

Biological Science: mentioned, 79 

Book rental fee, 5 

Botany: mentioned, 46, 79; curricula for 
Bachelor of Arts degree in, 82; cur- 
riculum for Bachelor of Science in 
Education degree in, 83; secondary con- 
centration in, 83; description of courses 
in, 83-84 

Business Division: objectives of, 11; areas 
of concentration listed, 11, 12; faculty 



119 



120 



SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



of, 11-12; Bachelor of Arts degree 
granted by, 12; Bachelor of Science de- 
gree offered by, 12; Bachelor of Science 
in Education degree granted by, 12; 
course requirements, 12; divisional re- 
quirements, 12; accounting, 12-14; eco- 
nomics, 15-17; management, 17-20; 
marketing, 20-22; secretarial and busi- 
ness education, 22-26 
Business teacher education: mentioned, 
22; courses recommended for secondary 
concentration in, 24-25; secondary con- 
centration in, 24, 25 

Certification, teacher: requirements for, 
29-30; see also teacher certification 

Chemistry: mentioned, 46, 79; curriculum 
for Bachelor of Arts degree in, 84-85; 
curriculum for Bachelor of Science in 
Education degree in, 85; secondary con- 
centration in, 85; description of courses 
in, 85-86 

Comparative literature: mentioned, 65; 
description of courses in, 67; prerequi- 
site for all courses in, 67; secondary 
concentration in, 67 

Concentration requirements: 8; exceptions 
to, 8 

Course descriptions: accounting, 13-14; 
economics, 16-17; management, 18-20; 
marketing, 21-22; secretarial and busi- 
ness education, 25-26; education ad- 
ministration, 29; elementary education, 
31-32; guidance, 33; health education, 
33-34; instructional materials, 35; physi- 
cal education for men, 38-41; physical 
education for women, 42-44; psychology, 
45-46; secondary education, 47; special 
education, 48-49; art, 54-55; music, 
57-60; speech, 62-64; comparative lit- 
erature, 67; English, 68-70; humanities 
honors program, 71: journalism, 71; 
foreign languages, 73-76; philosophy, 
76-77; applied science, 81-82; astrono- 
my, 82; botany, 83-84; chemistry, 85- 
86; mathematics, 87-89; physics, 91; 
physiology, 91-92; zoology, 93-94; an- 
thropology, 96-97; geography, 98-102; 
government, 103-105; history, 107-109; 
sociology, 112-114 

Curricula: accounting, 13; economics, 15- 
16; management, 17-18; marketing, 20- 
21; secretarial and business education, 
23-25; elementary education, 30-31; 
physical education for men, 36; physi- 
cal education for women, 41-42; psy- 
chology, 44-45; special education, 48; 
fine arts, 53-54; art, 54; music, 55-57; 
English, 68; botany, 82-83; chemistry, 
84-85; mathematics, 86-87; physics, 90; 
zoology, 92-93; geography, 97-98; gov- 
ernment, 102; history, 106; public ad- 
ministration and planning, 110-111; 
sociology, 111-112 



Degree requirements: in area of concentra- 
tion, 8; exceptions to in area of concen- 
tration, 8; for Bachelor of Arts degree, 
9 

Divisions, academic: see academic divi- 
sions 

Doctor of Philosophy degree: approved, 
1; how to obtain information about, 4 

East St. Louis residence center: estab- 
lished, 1, 3; location of, 2; description 
of, 3 

Economics: mentioned, 11, 12; areas of 
study in, 15; objectives of, 15; curricu- 
lum for Bachelor of Arts degree in, 15; 
curriculum for Bachelor of Science de- 
gree in, 15; curriculum for Bachelor of 
Science in Education degree in, 15-16; 
secondary concentration in, 16; descrip- 
tion of courses in, 16-17 

Education administration: mentioned, 27; 
objectives of, 28-29; description of 
courses in, 29 

Education Division: areas of study in, 
mentioned, 27; objectives of, 27; faculty 
of, 27-28; divisional requirements for 
Bachelor of Science in Education de- 
gree, 28; administration, 28-29; ele- 
mentary education, 29-32; guidance, 
32-34; health education, 33-34; in- 
structional materials, 35; nursing, 36; 
physical education for men, 36-41; 
physical education for women, 41-44; 
psychology, 44-46; secondary education, 
46-47; special education, 48-49; stu- 
dent teaching, 49-51 

Elementary education: mentioned, 5, 27; 
requirements for Bachelor of Science in 
Education degree in, 29-30; curriculum 
for Bachelor of Science in Education 
degree in, 30-31; description of courses 
in, 31-32; student teaching courses 
available in, 49 

English: mentioned, 46, 65; curriculum 
for Bachelor of Arts degree in, 68; sec- 
ondary concentration in, 68; description 
of courses in, 68-70 

English Composition: required sequence, 8 

Fees: University's right to change, 2; 
tuition and, for one quarter, 5-6 

Fine Arts Division: areas of study in, 52; 
objectives of, 52; faculty of, 52-53; de- 
grees granted by, 53; divisional require- 
ments, 53; art, 53-55; music, 55-60; 
speech, 60-64 

Foreign languages: mentioned, 46, 65; cur- 
riculum for bachelor's degrees in, 72; 
secondary concentration in, 72; descrip- 
tion of courses in, 73-76 

General Studies: courses required for 
bachelor's degree candidates, 7; inau- 
guration of, 7; advanced standing as- 



INDEX 



121 



signments, 8; proficiency examinations, 
8; required English composition se- 
quence in, 8; waiver of courses in, 8 

Geography: mentioned, 46, 95; Bachelor 
of Arts degree in, 97; Bachelor of Sci- 
ence in Education degree in, 97; cur- 
riculum for Bachelor of Arts degree in, 
97-98; curriculum for Bachelor of Sci- 
ence in Education degree in, 98; second- 
ary concentration, 98; description of 
courses in, 98-102 

Government: mentioned, 46, 95; concen- 
tration in, 102; curriculum for Bachelor 
of Arts degree in, 102; curriculum for 
Bachelor of Science in Education degree 
in, 102; required courses in areas of 
specialization, 102; secondary concen- 
tration in, 102; description of courses 
in, 103-105 

Grade point average required for bache- 
lor's degree, 6-7 

Graduate courses, purpose of, 5 

Graduate degrees: granted by the Univer- 
sity, 1 

Graduate programs, 4-5 

Graduation: University's right to change 
rules regulating, 2; application for, 9 

Guidance: mentioned, 5, 27; master's de- 
gree in mentioned, 32; undergraduate 
requirements for graduate study in, 32- 
33; description of courses in, 33 

Health education: mentioned, 27; second- 
ary concentration in, 33; description of 
courses in, 33-34 

History: mentioned, 46, 95; curriculum 
for Bachelor of Arts degree in, 106; 
curriculum for Bachelor of Science in 
Education degree in, 106; secondary 
concentration in, 107; description of 
courses in, 107-109 

Honors Program (in Humanities) : men- 
tioned, 65; description of courses in, 71 

Humanities Division: areas of study in, 
65; faculty of, 65; objectives of, 65; di- 
visional requirements for Bachelor of 
Arts degree, 66; requirements for con- 
centration in, 66; comparative literature, 
67; English, 68-70; journalism, 71; for- 
eign languages, 72-76; philosophy, 76- 
77 

Humanities Honors Program: mentioned, 
65; description of courses in, 71 

Industrial management program, 116 

In-plant programs: 116-117 

Instructional materials: mentioned, 27; 
secondary concentration in library sci- 
ence, 35; description of courses in, 35 

Intramural council, 37 

Intramural athletics for men, 37-38 

lournalism: mentioned, 65; description of 
courses in, 71 



Library science: secondary concentration 
in, 35 

Management: mentioned, 11, 12; areas of 
study in, 17; objectives of, 17; curricu- 
lum in for Bachelor of Science degree, 
17-18; secondary concentration in, 18; 
description of courses in, 18-20 

Marketing: mentioned, 11, 12; areas of 
study in, 20; objectives of, 20; suggested 
curriculum for Bachelor of Science de- 
gree in, 20-21; secondary concentration 
in, 21, description of courses in, 21-22 

Master's degrees: approved, 1; how to ob- 
tain information about, 4 

Mathematics: mentioned, 46, 79; curricu- 
lum for Bachelor of Arts degree in, 
86-87; curriculum for Bachelor of Sci- 
ence in Education degree in, 87; second- 
ary concentration in, 87; description of 
courses in, 87-89 

Music: mentioned, 46, 52; Bachelor of 
Arts degree in, 55; Bachelor of Music 
degree, 55; curriculum for Bachelor 
of Arts degree in, 55-56; curricula for 
Bachelor of Music degree, 56-57; de- 
scription of courses in, 57-60 

Noncredit courses: in technical and adult 

education, 115-118 
Nursing: mentioned, 27; 36 

Philosophy: mentioned, 65; secondary con- 
centration in, 76; description of courses 
in, 76-77 

Physical education: waiver of requirement 
in, 8; mentioned, 46 

Physical education for men: mentioned, 
27; Bachelor of Science in Education 
degree in, 36; courses required for all 
bachelor's degree students, 36; curricu- 
lum for Bachelor of Science in Edu- 
cation degree in, 36; required courses, 
36, 37; secondary concentration in, 37; 
student teaching in, 37; intramural ath- 
letics, 37-38; description of courses in, 
38-41 

Physical education for women: mentioned, 
27; curriculum for Bachelor of Science 
in Education degree in, 41-42; second- 
ary concentration in, 42; description 
of courses in, 42-44 

Physical science: secondary concentration 
in, 81 

Physics: mentioned, 46, 79; curriculum 
for Bachelor of Arts degree in, 90; cur- 
riculum for Bachelor of Science in Edu- 
cation degree in, 90; secondary concen- 
tration in, 90; description of courses 
in, 91 

Physiology: mentioned, 79; description of 
courses in, 91-92 

Preprofessional programs, 4 

Prerequisites: for student teaching, 50-51; 



122 



SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



for comparative literature courses, 67 

Proficiency examinations: in General 
Studies, 8 

Programs of Instruction: bachelor's degree 
programs, 4; preprofessional programs, 
4; graduate programs, 4-5 

Psychology: mentioned, 27; Bachelor of 
Arts degree in, 44, 45; Bachelor of Sci- 
ence in Education degree in, 44, 45; 
secondary concentration in, 45; de- 
scription of courses in, 45-46 

Public administration and planning: men- 
tioned, 95; Bachelor of Arts degree in, 
110; objectives of, 110; curriculum for 
Bachelor of Arts degree in, 110-111 

Quarters, academic: opening and closing 
times of, 2; summer, 2 

Registration: 6 

Requirements, divisional: see divisional 

requirements 
Requirements for a degree: in area of 

concentration, 8; grade point average, 

6-7; for Bachelor of Arts degree, 9 
Residence centers: establishment of, 1, 3; 

location of, 2; description of, 3 

Science and Technology Division: areas 
of study in, 79; objectives of, 79; faculty 
of, 79-80; divisional requirements for 
bachelor's degrees, 80-81; requirements 
for secondary concentration in, 81; 
secondary concentration in physical sci- 
ence, 81; applied science, 81-82; astrono- 
my, 82; botany, 82-84; chemistry, 84- 
86; mathematics, 86-89; physics, 90-91; 
physiology, 91-92; zoology, 92-94 

Secondary education: mentioned, 5, 27; 
concentration in, 46; objectives of, 46; 
required courses in social studies, 46; 
description of courses in, 47; professional 
education requirements for certification, 
47; student teaching courses available 

^ in, 50 

Secretarial and business education: men- 
tioned, 11; areas of study in, 22; cur- 
riculum leading to Bachelor of Science 
degree in, 23; curriculum leading to 
Bachelor of Science in Education degree 
in, 23-24; secondary concentrations in, 
24; description of courses in, 25-26 

Secretarial and office management: men- 
tioned, 22 

Secretarial training and office manage- 
ment: secondary concentration in, 24, 
25 

Sessions, academic, 2 

Social Sciences Division: areas of study 
in, 95; objectives of, 95; faculty of, 95- 
96; divisional requirements for Bachelor 
of Arts degree in, 96; anthropology, 
96-97; geography, 97-102; government, 
102-105; history, 106-109; public ad- 



ministration and planning, 110-111; 
sociology, 111-114 

Social Studies: required courses for, 46 

Sociology: Bachelor of Arts degree in, 111; 
Bachelor of Science in Education de- 
gree in, 111; curriculum for Bachelor 
of Arts degree in, 111; curriculum for 
Bachelor of Science in Education degree 
in, 112; secondary concentration in, 
112; description of courses in, 112-114 

Special education: mentioned, 5, 27; cur- 
riculum leading to Bachelor of Science 
in Education degree in, 48; undergradu- 
ate concentration in, 48; description of 
courses in, 48-49; student teaching 
courses available in, 50 

Speech: mentioned, 46, 52; objectives of, 
60-61; areas of study in, 61; suggested 
curricula for Bachelor of Arts degree in, 
61-62; secondary concentration in, 62; 
description of courses in, 62-64 

Speech correction: mentioned, 61 

Speech education: curriculum for Bachelor 
of Arts degree in, 61-62 

Speech, general: curriculum for Bachelor 
of Arts degree in, 61-62 

Student activity fee, 6 

Student teaching: mentioned, 27; in physi- 
cal education for men, 37; duties of stu- 
dent teachers, 49; length of time re- 
quired, 49; supervision of, 49; courses 
available in, 49-50; general prerequi- 
sites for, 50; prerequisites for early 
childhood, 51; prerequisites for ele- 
mentary, 51; prerequisites for secondary, 
51; prerequisites for special education, 
51 

Student union building fund fee, 5 

Summer quarter, 2 

Teacher certification: requirements for, 
29-30; professional education require- 
ments for in secondary education, 47 

Technical and adult education: faculty, - 
115; registration for, 115-116; industrial 
management program, 116; veterans' 
information, 116; in-plant programs, 
116-117; traffic management program, 
117-118 

Theater: mentioned, 61; curriculum for 
Bachelor of Arts degree in, 62 

Traffic management program, 117-118 

Tuition and fees: for one quarter, 5-6 

Veterans: registration for technical and 

adult education courses, 116 
Waivers: of general studies courses, 8 

Zoology: mentioned, 46, 79; curriculum 
for Bachelor of Arts degree in, 92; cur- 
riculum for Bachelor of Science in Edu- 
cation degree in, 92-93; secondary con- 
centration in, 93; description of courses 
in, 93-94 



XLUNOIS^ 

<T |innj[ "Z 




^UNDATICT 



Southern Illinois University Foundation 

The Southern Illinois University Foundation is a nonprofit corporation 
chartered by the state and authorized by the Board of Trustees to receive 
gifts for the benefit of the University, to buy and sell property, and otherwise 
to serve the University. 

It respectfully asks alumni and other citizens of Southern Illinois to con- 
sider making gifts and bequests to benefit the University. Such gifts should be 
conveyed to the Foundation, with proper stipulation as to their uses. The 
Foundation, through its officers and members, will be glad to confer with in- 
tending donors regarding suitable clauses to insert in wills and suitable 
forms of gifts and memorials, including bequests by means of life insurance. 
Large or small gifts to the library will be appreciated; likewise, gifts for spe- 
cial equipment, buildings, endowment of professorships in particular subjects, 
gifts to student loan funds and scholarship funds, gifts for the use of foreign 
students, and endowments for particular sorts of research. Any gifts or be- 
quests can be given suitable memorial names. 
The staff members of the Foundation are 

Mr. Kenneth R. Miller, Executive Director, Carbondale, Illinois 

Mrs. Lois H. Nelson, Secretary, Carbondale, Illinois 

Mr. Robert L. Gallegly, Treasurer, Carbondale, Illinois. 

Mr. C. Eugene Peebles, Assistant Treasurer, Edwardsville, Illinois 

Mr. C. Richard Gruny, Legal Counsel, Carbondale, Illinois 

Mr. L. James Struif, Assistant Legal Counsel, Edwardsville, Illinois 

Mr. Donald Leavitt, Patent Counsel, St. Louis, Missouri 

Mr. Warren Stookey, Field Representative, Edwardsville, Illinois. 



ALT BEAUTY 

ID IN AF 

IE BE- 
IN TOUC 

: OF TR1 

ER THEY MAY L 

I INK, 

MIND 
IN THEIR SELF-DEVELOPMENT; 

TO FORWARD IDEAS AND IDE; 






General Studies 

and Reserve Officers Training Corps 

Announcements for 1963-1964 




SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

Volume 5 Number 7 August, 1963 

Second-class postage paid at Carbondale, Illinois. Pub- 
lished by Southern Illinois University, monthly, except 
June and July. 



The following issues of the Southern Illinois University Bulletin 

may be obtained without charge from Central Publications, 

Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois. 

General Information 

Summer Session (Carbondale) 

Summer Session (Edwardsville) 

Schedule of Classes (Carbondale) 

Schedule of Classes (Edwardsville) 

Divisional Announcements (Edwardsville) 

Graduate School 

College of Education 

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences 

School of Agriculture 

School of Business 

School of Communications 

School of Fine Arts 

School of Home Economics 

Division of Technical and Adult Education 

All intending students should have the General Information 
bulletin (issued once a year), plus the special bulletins of the 
various educational units in which they are most interested. 



Composed and printed by Printing Service 

Southern Illinois University 

Carbondale, Illinois 



Board of Trustees 



TERM EXPIRES 

John Page Wham, Chairman, Centralia 1965 

Kenneth L. Davis, Vice -Chair man, Harrisburg 1963 

Melvin C. Lockard, Secretary, Mattoon 1965 

Martin Van Brown, Carbondale 1967 

Harold R. Fischer, Granite City 1963 

Arnold H. Maremont, Winnetka 1967 

Lindell W. Sturgis, Metropolis 1965 
Ray Page (Ex-officio), Springfield 
Louise Morehouse, Recorder 



Officers of Instruction 



Delyte W. Morris, President 
Charles D. Tenney, Vice-President for Instruction 

Carbondale Campus Edwardsville Campus 

John E. Grinnell Clarence W. Stephens 

Vice-President for Operations Vice-President for Operations 

William J. McKeefery William T. Going 
Dean of Academic Affairs Dean of Instruction 

Robert A. McGrath John H. Schnabel 

Registrar and Director Registrar and Director 

of Admissions of Admissions 



This Bulletin Table of Contents 



presents the General 
Studies program which 
was inaugurated at South- 
ern Illinois University in 
the fall of 1962 and which 
is required of all bachelor's 
degree students. It also 
covers in detail questions 
concerning the Air Force 
Reserve Officers Training 
Corps, which is for Car- 
bondale Campus students 
only. 



General Studies 1 

Outline of Requirements 3 

Criteria for Courses 3 

Advisement 4 

Acceleration and Placement 5 

Waivers 5 

Advanced Standing 5 

Proficiency Examinations 6 

Course Descriptions 6 

Carbondale Campus 6 

GSA 6 

GSB 7 

GSC 8 

GSD 11 

GSE 12 

Edwardsville Campus 13 

GSA 13 

GSB 14 

GSC 15 

GSD 16 

GSE 16 

Requirements 17 

Curriculum Guides (See Index) .... 18 

Carbondale Campus 19 

Edwardsville Campus 58 

Air Force Reserve Officers Training 

Corps (Carbondale Campus Only) 68 

The Required Basic Course 69 

The Voluntary Advanced Course .. 69 

Air Force ROTC Awards 72 

Air Science Courses 74 

Index 75 



General Studies 



Executive Officers: S. D. Lovell (Edwardsville), John W. Voigt (Carbondale) 
Southern Illinois University was established in 1869 as Southern Illinois 
Normal University. The shortened name became official in 1947 by action 
of the state legislature. The University now operates two major campuses, 
located at Carbondale and Edwardsville. 

In the fall quarter of 1962, Southern Illinois University initiated a 
new, expanded program in General Studies. This program is required of 
all bachelor's degree students and replaces a program of distributive re- 
quirements, which called for the student to take a certain number of hours 
in several specified areas. In such a plan the student paid little attention 
to the order in which the courses were taken and sometimes even to the 
time, during his four years, when they were taken. Knowledge has a unity 
which is violated by such arrangement, and it is felt that only the better 
students put it all together in proper meaning and perspective. 

Several recent developments have influenced colleges and universities 
toward General Studies programs. One of these is the explosive increase 
in the amount of knowledge that man has achieved. Another is that an 
increased standard of living has permitted a greater proportion of qualified 
youth to enter college. Colleges and universities are slowly accepting the 
new roles and responsibilities that have been thrust upon them and are 
accepting the fact that the subject matter of a university does not exist 
independently of the society which supports it. 

Even a cursory examination of college catalogs will convince the im- 
partial examiner of the need for some counter balances to specialism. The 
number of course offerings is seldom in direct proportion to the value of 
the courses. Further, the education of an enlightened people through the 
transmission of the culture of our times is a basic objective of higher edu- 
cation. Specialists themselves realize that rigid concentration within any 
field of study may deprive them of broader understandings so important 
for participation in life as citizens and parents. 

Frequently the question is raised, "Why must I take this course or 
that course? I am preparing to make this subject my life's work, and will 

1 



2 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

not need the other courses I am being made to take." The answer is, of 
course, that all of our society must understand the ways in which the 
awesome discoveries in atomic energy, rocketry, and medicine, etc., shape 
our happiness, and may even determine our national survival. It has been 
said that the tempo of scientific progress is geared to our national security 
and welfare. 

The technological revolution brought on by these discoveries has pre- 
sented us with many social problems. These problems, too, have risen 
quickly, and the consequent social reactions of apathy, boredom, anxieties, 
frustration, changes in values, change in role, etc., indicate a clear need 
for better understanding to bring about a better social adjustment. Our edu- 
cational efforts must produce citizens and leaders with an ability to use 
knowledge in a way which also advances social and cultural life. 

Many leaders in higher education are convinced by the hard school of 
experience that a smattering and cafeteria-style sampling of introductory 
courses offered by "departments" have not provided a unified, broad under- 
standing of the world that surrounds us. They note the advances that have 
come from research in the area of the psychology of learning. This com- 
paratively new branch of the social sciences calls attention to new methods 
for stimulating reflective thinking, desires for stimulating learning, and 
better methods of presenting materials. Leaders in higher education are cur- 
rently interested in the experimentation throughout the nation with teach- 
ing machines, with instruction through television, and with team teaching. 
Perhaps some of these new devices and new methods will lend themselves 
to the teaching of courses that meet the criteria for General Studies. There 
is a growing belief that instructional materials should be selected for the 
influence they will presumably have on the intellectual, moral, social, and 
personal development of students as well as for the support they may pro- 
vide to a specific department or discipline. 

General Studies are only part, not the whole, of man's education. 
While General Studies can conceivably help a student in his choice of 
occupation and can contribute to his success in a given occupation, their 
principal objective is not to develop vocational skills. They comprise that 
portion of the total curriculum which is concerned with the common needs 
of man and which assists the student to be more at home in a world that 
increasingly demands more of all men in terms of the intellectual, spiritual, 
and social. One of the prime purposes of a General Studies program is to 
prepare students to assume their proper responsibilities in an ever chang- 
ing world. 

The General Studies program at Southern has been structured to build 
in a relevance and continuity of subject matter. Progressive three-quarter 
sequences (three hours per quarter) have been designed. First-level or 
freshman courses are planned sequences, with the second quarter's work 



GENERAL STUDIES 3 

based upon the first and the third quarter's work based upon the second. 
Second-level courses are normally completed during the sophomore and 
junior years. Third-level courses are offered to juniors and seniors. The 
new courses are not self-contained isolated units. The result is that a sense 
of unity is given to the whole program. 

OUTLINE OF GENERAL STUDIES REQUIREMENTS 

Area A: Mans Physical Environment and Biological Inheritance. ...24 hours 
A first-level basic sequence 9 hours 

A second-level continuation sequence 9 hours 

Third-level advanced courses 6 hours 

Area B: Mans Social Inheritance and Social Responsibilities 24 hours 

A first-level basic sequence 9 hours 

A second-level continuation sequence 9 hours 

Third- level advanced courses 6 hours 

Area C: Mans Insights and Appreciations 24 hours 

A first-level basic sequence 9 hours 

A second-level continuation sequence 9 hours 

Third-level advanced courses 6 hours 

Area D: Organization and Communication of Ideas 18 hours 

Required college composition and speech 9 hours 

Either a foreign language sequence or a basic 

mathematics sequence 9 hours 

Area E: Health and Physical Development 6 hours 

First-level required physical education 3 hours 

Second-level required health education 3 hours 

CRITERIA FOR GENERAL STUDIES COURSES 

All courses sent to the President's Committee on General Studies are 
carefully studied to determine their acceptability in meeting the following 
criteria: 

1. Does the course emphasize insight into the basic principles and practices 
of the field of study concerned? 

2. Does the course serve as an adequate terminal course for those who 
will not take additional work in this area? 

3. Does the course show the relevance of a particular discipline to the 
understanding of other disciplines? 

4. Does the course avoid overlapping or unduly repeating materials which 
are sufficiently covered elsewhere? 

5. Does the course avoid repeating materials already covered adequately 
in high school? 



4 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

6. Does the course provide an incentive for additional study in General 
Studies while in college and afterwards? 

7. Does the course have depth and intensity in the materials selected for 
instruction, as well as breadth of outline? 

8. In general, does the material of this course justify its inclusion in the 
General Studies program of Southern Illinois University? 

ADVISEMENT 

Academic advisement for students during the first two years is under 
the general direction of the executive officers of General Studies. Academic 
advisement for upperclassmen (those enrolled in the various colleges, 
schools, divisions, and departments) is under the general direction of the 
officers of the academic units in which they are enrolled. Co-ordination of 
the two types of advisement is the responsibility of the general academic 
deans (or their delegated representatives) of the two campuses. 

A student entering the University as a freshman or sophomore is en- 
rolled in the General Studies program (except one entering the Vocational- 
Technical Institute). He may or may not indicate a tentative choice of his 
primary field of interest, but he does not formally apply for admission into 
a specialized field until the quarter before he reaches junior standing. 

Although the number of quarter hours in the General Studies curricu- 
lum constitutes approximately half of the number required for graduation, 
sufficient hours remain for adequate work in one's special field of interest. 
The General Studies requirements do not eliminate the possibility of an 
early start in that field, for one who has declared his field of interest may 
waive the first-level sequence in the appropriate area. However, anyone 
who has not declared his field of interest, can take the General Studies 
sequences to the extent of a full load for several quarters and be able to 
make an unhurried selection. 

Electives are built into the General Studies curriculum by a system of 
options, particularly on the second and third levels. 

The new student can advance register and should see an adviser. Dur- 
ing his first quarter, and each quarter thereafter, he may advance register 
for the succeeding quarter. Advisers need be consulted during registration 
only if necessary. The adviser is available for help if needed, but the respon- 
sibility for a correct registration and for meeting the requirements rests 
upon the student. He is encouraged by his general adviser, even during 
his first two years, to consult with representatives of the appropriate aca- 
demic units concerning his possible field of interest. 

This bulletin contains two-year curriculum guides showing the dis- 
tribution of General Studies courses and courses for particular fields of 
interest. A curriculum guide is provided for the student of undecided in- 



GENERAL STUDIES 5 

terest. The student who follows one of these curriculum guides may fill 
out and submit his schedule to the sectioning center of the Registrar's 
Office. If the student deviates from the curriculum guide he must then 
see a general adviser. In the curriculum guides, most General Studies 
courses are arranged as one-year sequences. The student is therefore en- 
couraged to think of his registrations in terms of year-long increments in 
the various areas. 



ACCELERATION AND PLACEMENT 

There are three ways in which partial requirements of the General 
Studies program may be met without taking the courses specifically de- 
signed to meet those requirements. They are waivers, advanced-standing 
assignments, and proficiency examinations. 

Depending upon their background preparation in a particular sub- 
ject, students may be placed in different sections of a particular course or 
in different sequences. 

All students enrolled in the General Studies program are urged to con- 
sult their advisers at the earliest possible moment concerning the procedures 
for accelerating their programs. 

WAIVERS 

Each student is entitled to waive (i.e., omit entirely) the first-level 
sequence in the area (A, B, or C only) in which he will concentrate his 
work and to begin his work in that area at the second level. This is inad- 
visable, however, for some majors; and the department or division involved 
may require the student to take the first-level sequence. Of course the stu- 
dent who has not chosen a field of concentration cannot waive a first-level 
sequence. 

ADMISSION WITH ADVANCED STANDING 

More commonly, advanced standing will be achieved on the basis of 
a.c.t. scores and the high school record, or through passing a special ad- 
vanced-standing examination (not the proficiency exam). Where a stu- 
dent qualifies for advanced standing in a course he will not be permitted 
to enroll in that course for credit. For example, if the student qualifies 
for advanced standing in GSD 114, he will not take GSD 114 for credit. 

A student who gains exemption from certain courses by advanced 
standing may (1) take advanced work in that area if more work is re- 
quired by the General Studies program, (2) discontinue any further work 
in that area if it is not required by the General Studies program, (3) take 
advanced work in that area to satisfy the requirements of a particular cur- 
riculum, or (4) take additional courses in that area as electives. 



6 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

Advanced standing for the General Studies program should not be con- 
fused with the High School Advanced Placement Program of the College 
Entrance Examination Board. Information on the Advanced Placement 
Program appears in the General Information issue of the Southern Illinois 
University Bulletin. 

PROFICIENCY EXAMINATIONS 

The rules covering the General Studies proficiency examinations are 
similar to those governing other proficiency examinations at Southern. 

If a student passes a proficiency examination over a General Studies 
course he will be exempt from that portion of the program. In addition, if 
his grade is B or better, he will be granted an equivalent number of quarter 
hours toward graduation. 

Information concerning proficiency examinations may be secured from 
the Registrar's Office, Carbondale, or from the Office of Academic Advise- 
ment, Edwardsville. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

These are General Studies courses rather than departmental courses. 
They are identified by area and number, not by department and number. 
For example, a student taking Elementary French might enroll in General 
Studies D (GSD) 123 or 173, but not in French 123 or 173. 

Carbondale Campus 

GSA MAN'S PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT AND BIOLOGICAL INHERITANCE 

Three second-level sequences are offered in Area A: (1) 201, 202, 203; 
(2) 200, 201, 202; (3) 201, 202, 200. It is recommended that 200 precede 201. 

101-3, 102-3, 103-3. ENERGY AND PARTICLES I, II, III. The basic physical 
sciences. 

200-3. GEOLOGY. A study of the Earth from the dynamic viewpoint of inter- 
acting geological processes: earth materials, the unstable crust, erosion, 
and deposition. Inter-relationships of these elements produce the great 
range of environments which have continually shifted and changed 
through geologic history. 

201-3, 202-3, 203-3. MAN'S BIOLOGICAL INHERITANCE. An introduction 
to the study of composition, structure, and function in living things. 

301-4. PRINCIPLES OF PHYSIOLOGY. A comprehensive introductory analy- 
sis of the functional machinery of the human body. 

302-3. PSYCHOBIOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS OF BEHAVIOR. A study of 
the behavioral characteristics of living organisms, especially those of 
mammals and man. 

312-3. CONSERVATION OF NATURAL RESOURCES. A consideration of 
man and his resource environment through an understanding and ap- 
preciation of the ecosystem. 



GENERAL STUDIES COURSES, CARBONDALE 7 

313-3. EVOLUTION. Principles and processes of the evolution of living things, 
including man. Prerequisite: one year of biology. 

314-3. MAN'S GENETIC HERITAGE. Principles of heredity as related to 
man, with emphasis on the effects of environment on his biological 
inheritance. 

315-3. HISTORY OF BIOLOGY. The inter-relationship between the develop- 
ment of biological knowledge and the history of mankind. 

330-3. WEATHER. Principles that govern the world distribution of weather 
and climate with emphasis upon the effects of weather and climate on 
agriculture, aviation, business, industry, transportation, and the develop- 
ment of our recreational resources. (Students may take only 330 or 331 
for GSA-3 credit.) 

331-3. CLIMATE. Principles of climatology; physical basis for the differentia- 
tion of climatic types, description and significance of climatic regions. 
(Students may take only 330 or 331 for GSA-3 credit.) 

340-3. ECOLOGY. A consideration of ecological principles with emphasis 
upon examples relating to vegetation. 

GSB MAN'S SOCIAL INHERITANCE AND SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITIES 

101-3, 102-3, 103-3. MAN AND CULTURE IN TIME AND SPACE I, II, III. 
Temporal and spatial development and evaluation of civilization. Em- 
phasis on western civilization from the Middle Ages to the present and 
its great influence on the rest of the world. Courses should be taken in 
sequence. 

201-3, 202-3, 203-3. CULTURE, BEHAVIOR, AND SOCIETY. An integrated 
examination of anthropological, psychological, and sociological contri- 
butions to the understanding of human behavior. Courses should be 
taken in sequence. 

211-3, 212-3, 213-3. POLITICAL ECONOMY I, II, III. The making of public 
policy in the economic sphere through a study of the functioning of the 
economy and the operation of government. 

301-3. LAW: COMPARATIVE LEGAL SYSTEMS. A comparison of the legal 
institutions and laws in the United States, Western Europe, South 
America, and Eastern nations. 

302-3. LAW: CIVIL RIGHTS. The law protecting the civil liberties and rights 
of people. 

*303-3. INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS. A study of world politics. The 
causes of international conflict and the conditions of peace. 

304-3. LAW: HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY. A study of the evolution and 
development of law beginning with the ancient and archaic periods. 
Greek law, Roman law, and English and American law. In addition, 
the historical development of legal philosophy is reviewed. 

311-3. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OF THE UNITED STATES. A study 
of the development of the U.S. economy which emphasizes the under- 
lying trends and forces of changes that have led to our present economic 
structure, level of performance, and world position. 

312-3. COMPARATIVE ECONOMIC SYSTEMS. A comparative study of the 
goals, structure, and operation of the major economic systems, such as 
capitalism, socialism, communism, and fascism. Emphasis will be placed 
upon basic systems of organization and control, and upon mixed econo- 



8 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

mies, rather than upon the traditional compartments within which eco- 
nomic systems are sometimes put. 

•313-3. ECONOMICS OF WAR AND PEACE. A study of relations between 
wartime and peacetime economies with specific references to government 
controls, impact of military expenditures in "hot" and "cold" wars, and 
the reallocation of resources. 

314-3. ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF THE AGRICULTURAL POLICIES OF 
THE UNITED STATES. A study of the agricultural policies of the 
United States with emphasis on the underlying economic bases of such 
policies and the effects of such policies on farmers, middlemen, and 
consumers. 

*323-3. THE CENTURY OF TOTAL WAR. The relations between warfare 
and modern political, economic, and social conditions. Little attention 
is paid to tactics and strategy as such, but the relationship between 
political policy and military power is stressed. 

331-3. THE AMERICAN EDUCATIONAL SYSTEMS. A comprehensive study 
of the nature and purpose of Education in the United States and of how 
our schools are organized, financed, and conducted. 

**333-3. SEMINAR IN PROBLEMS OF WAR AND PEACE. Interdisciplinary 
topics in the general area of war and peace. 

*343-3. GEOGRAPHICAL BASIS OF INTERNATIONAL CONFLICTS. Ex- 
amination of geographical factors of world political relations and con- 
flicts during the inter-war and post-war periods. 

* Problems of Peace and War is a sequence of four separate courses (*), 
**any one of which leads to an integrated seminar (**). 



GSC MAN S INSIGHTS AND APPRECIATIONS 

Two first-level sequences are offered: (1) 100 or 101, 102, and 103. 
Introduction to Man's Insights and Appreciations. Students may take 
courses in any order, but three courses constitute a sequence. (2) 110, 111, 
and 1 12. An Introduction to Western Humanities. 

Two second-level sequences are offered in Area C. One consists of a 
course from each of these three groups: (1) 201, 202, 203; (2) 204, 205, 
206; (3) 207, 208, 209, 210. The other sequence is 211, 212, and 213. 

100-3. INTRODUCTION TO MUSIC. The physical nature of sound and 
man's efforts to fashion aural sensations into works of musical art. In- 
cludes traditional and contemporary repertory and practical experience 
in music understanding through recital attendance. 

101-3. CHANGING VISUAL IMAGES OF MAN. A critical examination of the 
diverse visual images of the past and the present which are considered 
to be unique concrete forms of man's perceptions, ideas, and values and 
the particular expressive structure, content, and processes of the visual 
symbol system. 

102-3. PROBLEMS OF MORAL DECISION. An introduction to contemporary 
and perennial problems of personal and social morality, and to methods 
proposed for their resolution by some of the great thinkers of past and 
present. 



GENERAL STUDIES COURSES, CARBONDALE 9 

103-3. MASTERPIECES OF LITERATURE. Reading in English, literary 
masterpieces of the Western world, to increase the student's competence 
in reading imaginative literature, to acquaint him with the great ideas 
and values of the best literature, and to train him to deal with literary 
materials in his writing. 

110-3, 111-3, 112-3. AN INTRODUCTION TO WESTERN HUMANITIES 
I, II, III. An introduction to a carefully varied number of great works 
expressing the aesthetic, moral, and religious values of Western Man. 
It will (1) set forth the critical vocabulary of six humanistic disciplines: 
art, music, philosophy, design, literature, and theater; (2) provide some 
direct experience of each one; and (3) call attention to interrelations 
among the disciplines and between the humanities and other aspects of 
Western culture. Students registering for 110 must stay in the sequence 
for the year. 

201-3. INTRODUCTION TO DRAMA. Not a history of the drama. The class 
will read about a dozen plays, modern and ancient, and consider how 
various dramatic conventions and devices are used to give form and 
meaning to human experience. 

202-3. INTRODUCTION TO POETRY. A variety of poems, from the simpler 
to the more complex, are read and discussed. Emphasis is upon enjoy- 
ment and upon heightened insight into human experience. Devices of 
artistic form, such as imagery and meter, are discussed as they are in- 
volved with the substance they express, human actions, feelings, and 
attitudes, including the poet's satisfaction in giving artistic form to his 
material. 

203-3. DRAMA AND THE ARTS OF THE THEATRE. A study of (1) the 
drama as a literary type, (2) theatre arts as they subserve the drama, 
(3) the reciprocal conditioning which takes place between the drama, 
the theatre arts, and the audience. 

204-3. MEANING IN THE VISUAL ARTS. A historically-oriented conception 
of the relationship between art and civilization which seeps through 
the examination of relevant examples of the visual arts to develop 
awareness of the great complexities of artistic motivation, the develop- 
ment of art styles, and the interaction between the artist and society. 

205-3. THE CONTEMPORARY ENVIRONMENT. A lecture-laboratory 
course designed to create a picture plane whereon a student may see some 
principles underlying architecture, visual communication, and other 
products of his physical and cultural environment. 

206-3. FOUNDATION OF MUSIC. Emphasis on the historical sequence of 
musical development from primitive ages through the contemporary 
scene. An introduction to the materials of music, including application 
of basic skills to keyboard performance, is provided in studio sections. 
Two hours of lecture, one hour of studio each week. 

207-3. PHILOSOPHY OF THE BEAUTIFUL. A study of the structure and im- 
portance of the beautiful in nature, society, personality, and the arts. 

208-3. MEANING AND RATIONAL PROCESS. A critical study of expressive, 
informative, and other modes of discourse, with emphasis on their roles 
in rational process. 

209-3. MODERN LITERATURE: FORM AND IDEA. Designed to give the 
student an interest in and an understanding of the forms, themes, and 
values of modern American, British, and Continental literature. 



10 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

210-3. INTRODUCTION TO FICTION. A study of the chief techniques of 
fiction and of some of the acceptable criteria for judging fiction. Read- 
ings in some of the masterpieces among American and European short 
story and novel writers. 

211-3, 212-3, 213-3. AN INTRODUCTION TO ORIENTAL HUMANITIES. 
The literature, music, drama, visual art, and definitive cultural motifs 
of three great Asian traditions. Course 211 will focus on India, 212 on 
China, and 213 on Japan. Those who take 211 must take 212 and 213. 

305-3. CONTEMPORARY FRENCH DRAMA. Study of French contempor- 
ary drama since 1930, to be read in translation, with emphasis on the 
piece a these, the Theatre libre, symbolist drama, and the drama of 
modern social problems. 

310-3, 311-3, 312-3. RELIGIONS AND PHILOSOPHIES OF THE EAST. 

1) Religious Foundations of Western Civilization. Examination of the 
historical backgrounds and contemporary expressions of Jewish, Catholic, 
and Protestant thought. 

2) Philosophies and Religions of India. Historical and comparative 
study of Hindu, Jain, and early Buddhist thought and practice. 

3) Philosophies and Religions of the Far East. Historical study of the 
religous and secular thought of China and Japan: Confucianism, Tao- 
ism, and the varieties of Mahayana Buddhism. 

320-3. GREEK LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION. A study of the master- 
pieces of Greek literature in translation. 

330-3. CLASSICAL MYTHOLOGY. Study of the classical myths and their 
literary value. 

331-3. LATIN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION. Discussion of Latin liter- 
ary works and their influence on later literature. 

340-3. MODERN ART A: THE ART OF THE 19TH CENTURY. The prin- 
cipal movements of the 19th century: neo-classicism, romanticism, 
realism, impressionism, and post-impressionism. The styles of David, 
Ingres, Delacroix, Corot, Courbet, Manet, Degas, Monet, Renoir, Seurat, 
Van Gogh, and Gauguin receive emphasis. 

341-3. MODERN ART B: ART OF THE EARLY 20TH CENTURY 1890- 
1925. A study of modern art as manifest in Fauvism, cubism, and ex- 
pressionism. Emphasis on the artistic development of Cezanne, Matisse, 
Rouault, Picasso, Braque, Gris, Leger, Kirchner, and Kandinsky. 

342-3. MODERN ART C: ART OF THE MID 20TH CENTURY 1920-1945. 
Abstraction, later German expressionism, the school of Paris, and sur- 
realism. Special attention to the work of de Chirico, Klee, Miro, Beck- 
man, Chagall, Kokashka, Soutine, and late Matisse, Picasso, Braque, and 
Leger. 

348-3. PHOTOGRAPHY AND CINEMA. The basic technology of photography 
and cinema. The development of photography and cinema as art forms 
and their uses in education and mass communications. Criteria for the 
evaluation and appreciation of photography and cinema. 

381-3, 382-3, 383-3. EUROPEAN PHILOSOPHY, (a) Greek Philosophy: The 
thought of the pre-Socratics, Plato, and Aristotle, (b) Graeco-Roman 
and Medieval Philosophies: epicureanism, stoicism, and medieval Chris- 
tian thought, (c) Early Modern Philosophy: Bacon, Hobbes, Descartes, 
Leibniz, Spinoza, and the British empiricists in the context of the scien- 
tific and general social outlook of the period. 



GENERAL STUDIES COURSES, CARBONDALE 11 

386A-3, 386B-3. AMERICAN PHILOSOPHY, (a) From the colonial period 
to the Civil War. (b) Recent American Philosophy: Thought of Howi- 
son, Royce, Peirce, James, Dewey, and others. 

GSD ORGANIZATION AND COMMUNICATION OF IDEAS 

100-0. ENGLISH COMPOSITION: GRAMMAR AND USAGE. Required of 
all freshmen who need additional training in the fundamentals of gram- 
mar and usage (for these students, 100 is a prerequisite for 101 and 
103). 

101-3. ENGLISH COMPOSITION: PRINCIPLES OF DESCRIPTION AND 
EXPOSITION. A study of basic rhetorical principles through the 
analysis and synthesis of sentences, paragraphs, and complete papers. 
Prerequisite: 100 or satisfactory score on placement test. Courses 101, 
102, and 103 constitute a first-level sequence. 

102-3. ENGLISH COMPOSITION: PRINCIPLES OF ARGUMENT AND 
PERSUASION. A study of basic rhetorical principles through the 
analysis and synthesis of sentences, paragraphs, and complete papers. 
Prerequisite: 101. 

103-3. PRINCIPLES OF ORAL COMMUNICATION. Development of an un- 
derstanding of basic principles and proficiency in the skills involved in 
everyday communication. Prerequisite: 100, or English placement test 
score of 33 or above. 101, 102, and 103 constitute a first-level sequence. 

108-3, 109-3, 110-3. FUNDAMENTALS OF MATHEMATICS I, II, and III. 
An introduction to mathematical concepts and reasoning presented at 
a level appropriate for university students who have had high school 
courses in intermediate algebra and plane geometry. Topics include the 
number system, college algebra, analytic geometry, probability and 

114-3, 115-3, 116-3. COLLEGE ALGEBRA I, II, TRIGONOMETRY. A be- 
ginning sequence in university mathematics for students who have strong 
backgrounds in high school mathematics including at least intermediate 
algebra and plane geometry. Topics in college algebra and trigonometry 
are chosen with a view to their appropriateness for later work in analytic 
geometry and calculus. 115 and 116 may be taken concurrently. 

120-3, 121-3, 122-3. ELEMENTARY CHINESE. 1 Emphasis on the develop- 
ment of reading skills. 

123-3, 124-3, 125-3. ELEMENTARY FRENCH. 2 Open to students who have 
had no previous work in French. 

126-3, 127-3, 128-3. ELEMENTARY GERMAN. Open to students who have 
had no previous work in German. 

130-3, 131-3, 132-3. ELEMENTARY GREEK. Grammar emphasized in the 
first quarter, and reading of an actual text begun in the second. Text is 
usually the New Testament. 

notes pertaining to GSD 120 through 142: 

1 Sections of conversation for 1 hour of credit are available with each of these lan- 
guages, but on an elective basis. See the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences bulletin. 

2 Students having had high school language training should see the Department of 
Foreign Languages for placement. 

3 The first two courses in any sequence do not count toward the 192 hours required 
for graduation unless the third course is also completed. 



12 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

133-3, 134-3, 135-3. ELEMENTARY LATIN. Open to students who have had 

no previous work in Latin. 
136-3, 137-3, 138-3. ELEMENTARY RUSSIAN. Pronunciation; reading of 

elementary texts; oral practice; composition. 
140-3, 141-3, 142-3. ELEMENTARY SPANISH. Open to students who have 

had no previous work in Spanish. 

GSE HEALTH AND PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT 

The letter M or W following a course number indicates whether the 
course is for men (M) or for women (W). 

Students are to begin their physical development program by taking 
one of the following three courses: 101, 102, 103. (For students who can- 
not pass a swimming safety test, 101 is required.) 

Students may complete their three-hour requirement by taking two 
additional courses (excluding 101, 102, 103). Not more than two courses 
in the areas of dance and aquatics may apply toward fulfillment of the 
three-quarter sequence. 

100M-1. RESTRICTED PHYSICAL EDUCATION. Body control in restricted 
activities. Three classes per week. May be repeated for three quarters. 

101M-1. BEGINNING SWIMMING. 

102M-1. BASIC BODY MOVEMENT. 

103M-1. PERSONAL FITNESS. 

111M-1. INTERMEDIATE SWIMMING. 

114M-1. SPEEDBALL. 

115M-1. SOFTBALL. 

116M-1. ARCHERY. 

117M-1. BADMINTON. 

124M-1. BASKETBALL. 

126M-1. BEGINNING BOWLING. 

128M-1. TENNIS. 

134M-1. SOCCER. 

136M-1. GOLF. 

139M-1. GYMNASTICS. 

142M-1. SQUARE AND SOCIAL DANCE. 

144M-1. VOLLEYBALL AND TOUCH FOOTBALL. 

146M-1. PERSONAL DEFENSE. 

147M-1. WRESTLING. 

148M-1. CROSS COUNTRY. 

149M-1. STUNTS AND TUMBLING. 

100W-1, 110W-1, 120W-1. RESTRICTED PHYSICAL EDUCATION. Body 
control in restricted activities. Three classes per week. 

101W-1. BEGINNING SWIMMING. 

102W-1. BEGINNING CONTEMPORARY DANCE. 

103W-1. FUNDAMENTALS OF BODY MOVEMENT. 

111W-1. INTERMEDIATE SWIMMING. 

112W-1. INTERMEDIATE CONTEMPORARY DANCE. 

114W-1. SPEEDBALL. 

115W-1. SOFTBALL. 

116W-1. ARCHERY. 



GENERAL STUDIES COURSES, CARBONDALE 13 

117W-L BADMINTON. 

118W-1. BEGINNING FENCING. 

119W-L BEGINNING GOLF 

122W-1. FOLK DANCE. 

124W-1. BASKETBALL. 

125W-1. VOLLEYBALL. 

126W-1. BEGINNING BOWLING. 

128W-1. TENNIS. 

131W-1. DIVING. 

134W-1. SOCCER. 

142W-1. SQUARE AND SOCIAL DANCE. 

144W-1. HOCKEY. 

201-3. HEALTHFUL LIVING. Personal and community health. Designed to 
meet the general health needs and to develop wholesome health atti- 
tudes and practices in college students. 



Edwardsville Campus 

GSA MAN'S PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT AND BIOLOGICAL INHERITANCE 

151-3, 152-3, 153-3. INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL SCIENCE I, II, III. 

A study of the fundamentals of physical science. The atom and the 
physical and chemical principles necessary to understand its properties, 
structure, and combinations to form molecules. Courses should be taken 
in sequence. Prerequisite: Score on a.c.t. mathematics placement test 
or C in Mathematics 100 or pass departmental placement examination. 

251-3, 252-3, 253-3. MAN'S BIOLOGICAL INHERITANCE. A study of the 
fundamentals of biological science. The cell, inheritance, evolution, the 
diversity of living organisms, and the structure and function of higher 
animals and plants. Courses should be taken in sequence. 

255-3. EARTH SCIENCE. A study of the physical properties of the earth in- 
cluding earth-sun relationships, mapping, and landforms. Laboratory 
work required. To be alternative course for either 252 or 253. 

351-3. WEATHER. A study of weather elements basic to understanding the 
various atmospheric happenings. New applications of meteorology to 
everyday life, to industry and to the armed services. Students may take 
only one of the two courses 351 and 352 for GSA-3 credit. 

352-3. CLIMATOLOGY. Climatic controls. Description and interpretation of 
climates of the United States. Introduction to world climates and climatic 
influences on human activity. Students may take only one of the two 
courses 351 and 352 for GSA-3 credit. 

354-3. CONSERVATION OF NATURAL RESOURCES. Emphasizes the cor- 
rect use of the natural resource environment of our nation. 

356-3. ASTRONOMY. The earth, moon, solar system, galaxy, and universe. A 
first course, largely descriptive, but relating behavior of celestial bodies 
to fundamental physical laws. Prerequisite: GSA-1 or Physics 297. 

358-3, 359-3. ANALYSIS OF PHYSICAL SYSTEMS, I, II. Quantitative appli- 
cations of the principles of classical and modern physics. Students with 
credit in College Physics or University Physics may not receive credit 
beyond a total of 12 hours. 



14 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

361-3. PHYSICS OF MUSIC AND ACOUSTICS. Nature, propagation, sources, 
and receptors of sound; acoustic phenomena; physics of musical instru- 
ments; mathematics of music; ears and hearing; physiology and psychol- 
ogy; transmission, storage, and reproduction. 

GSB MAN'S SOCIAL INHERITANCE AND SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITIES 

151-3. SURVEY OF WESTERN TRADITION I. A general survey of the 
geographic setting in which western civilization developed. Physical, 
economic, and historical geography of the past and present Europe. 

152-3. SURVEY OF WESTERN TRADITION II. A general survey of the 
political, economic, social, and intellectual development of Western 
Europe from A.D. 1000 through the French Revolution. Prerequisite: 151. 

153-3. SURVEY OF WESTERN TRADITION III. A general survey of the 
political, economic, social, and intellectual development of Western 
Europe since the French Revolution. Prerequisite: 152. 

251-3, 252-3, 253-3. STUDY OF MAN: CULTURE, SOCIETY, AND THE 
INDIVIDUAL. Introduces the concepts of culture, society, and the in- 
dividual. The first part of the sequence lays the foundation with the 
introduction of culture and gives the background of man's cultural herit- 
age. The next phase integrates culture with society through the study 
of groups, the community, and American society. Finally, the effects of 
individual functioning upon the social processes in culture and society 
are shown. Courses should be taken in sequence. 

255-3, 256-3, 257-3. POLITICAL ECONOMY I, II, III. A study of the func- 
tioning of the economy, the operation of government, and the political, 
economic, and ideological determinants of public policy in regard to 
contemporary economic issues. Courses should be taken in sequence. 

331-3. THE AMERICAN EDUCATIONAL SYSTEMS. A comprehensive study 
of the nature and purpose of education in the United States and of how 
our schools are organized, financed, and conducted. 

351-3, 352-3. THE GEOGRAPHIC AND CULTURAL BACKGROUND OF 
DEVELOPING AFRICA I, II. In course I, the relation of geography to 
the culture of Africa is examined, and emphasis is given to the place 
cultural and geographic factors have in the developing nations of Africa. 
Course II offers an introduction to the many diverse cultures of Africa 
from the Egyptian civilization to the Bushmen hunters. It is desirable 
but not necessary for the two courses to be taken in sequence. 

354-3. INDUSTRIAL ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY. Geographic resource rela- 
tionship to the economic life of our nation, distribution of resources, 
industrial production, and the transportation of industrial products. 

357-3. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT OF THE UNITED STATES. A study 
of the development of the U.S. economy which emphasizes the underly- 
ing trends and forces of change that have led to our present economic 
structure, level of performance, and world position. Prerequisite: 255. 

359-3, 360-3. SOCIETY AND STATE: SOCIAL AND POLITICAL THEO- 
RIES I, II. Historical survey of political and social theories from ancient 
times to the 20th century. The formation of concepts will be traced from 
their origins in the early civilizations to their development in western 
thought. Critical analyses of representative thinkers. Either course may 
be taken alone for credit. 



GENERAL STUDIES COURSES, EDWARDSVILLE 15 



GSC MAN S INSIGHTS AND APPRECIATIONS 

Of the five courses offered in Area C, second level, the student is re- 
quired to take 251. As a second course he has an option between 252 and 
253. For the third course he has an option among 252 and 253 (the one 
he did not take as a second course), 254, and 255. 

151-3. INTRODUCTION TO POETRY. Introduction to the enjoyment of 
poetry. Practice in techniques of critical reading and writing. 

152-3. LOGIC. Study and practice in the analysis of verbal traps, relations 
between statements, deductive arguments, and inductive inferences. 

153-3. ART APPRECIATION. Study of significant achievements in art related 
to western culture and contemporary life. Optional with 154. 

154-3. MUSIC UNDERSTANDING. Criteria for discriminative music listen- 
ing as an asset to general culture. An examination of basic materials, 
techniques, and forms. Optional with 153. 

251-3. LITERARY AND PHILOSOPHICAL MASTERPIECES I. An introduc- 
tion to great works of the Western heritage. The Hebraic, Greek, and 
Latin traditions; beginning with Genesis and concluding with Augustine. 

252-3. LITERARY AND PHILOSOPHICAL MASTERPIECES II. An introduc- 
tion to great works of the Western heritage. The heroic and courtly tra- 
ditions; the new learning of the Renaissance in Europe; beginning with 
Beowulf and concluding with Milton. Prerequisite: 251. 

253-3. LITERARY AND PHILOSOPHICAL MASTERPIECES III. An intro- 
duction to great works of the Western heritage. Literary and philosophical 
rationalism, romanticism, realism, and naturalism; beginning with Mo- 
Here and concluding with Nietzsche. Prerequisite: 251. 

254-3. INTRODUCTION TO THE THEATER. A study of the nature and 
process of theatrical production. The role of the Theater in Western 
culture and its relation to other creative arts. Prerequisite: 252 or 253. 

255-3. MUSIC IN HISTORY. An introduction to music history within history 
in general. Prerequisite: 252 or 253. 

351-4, 352-4, 353-4. HISTORY OF WORLD ART I, II, III. A study of painting, 
sculpture, and architecture from early to modern times, emphasizing the 
social and intellectual content of the major periods and significant 
styles. Prerequisite: 9 hours in GSC-2. 

354-3, 355-3. HISTORY OF THE THEATER TO THE ITALIAN RENAIS- 
SANCE, HISTORY OF THE MODERN THEATER. 354: A study of 
primitive, Greek, medieval, and Italian Renaissance theater. 355: A 
study of the theater since the Italian Renaissance: emphasis on play- 
wrights, theaters, stages, actors, and designers. 

357-3, 358-3. MUSIC HISTORY AND LITERATURE I, II. The first quarter 
is an integrated course devoted to the development of musical thought 
and literature from the early Greek and Roman periods through the 
Renaissance. The second quarter continues through the 17th, 18th, 19th, 
and 20th centuries. Prerequisite: 255. 



16 SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



GSD ORGANIZATION AND COMMUNICATION OF IDEAS 

Students who have had two years of a foreign language in high school 
may bypass the GS language (or mathematics) requirement, if the language 
is one offered at either the Carbondale or the Edwardsville campus. Ad- 
vanced standing through the mathematics sequence GSD 164, 165, 166 also 
will meet the mathematics or language requirement. 

151-3, 152-3. ENGLISH COMPOSITION. Expository writing with emphasis 
upon organization according to the principles of rhetoric and upon the 
research paper. Required of all students. 151 is prerequisite to 152. 

153-3. ORAL COMMUNICATION OF IDEAS. The basic principles and tech- 
niques of oral communication; application of the principles in speech 
activities. Study of the forms of oral communication and the significance 
of oral communication to modern society. Required of all students. 

155-3, 156-3, 157-3. INTRODUCTION TO MATHEMATICS. Principal top- 
ics: logical rules of deduction, the real number system, mathematical 
structures. Courses should be taken in sequence. Prerequisite: Score on 
placement test or C in Mathematics 100. 

164-3, 165-3, 166-3. COLLEGE ALGEBRA I, II, TRIGONOMETRY. A be- 
ginning sequence in university mathematics for students who have strong 
backgrounds in high school mathematics, including at least intermediate 
algebra and plane geometry. Topics in college algebra and trigonometry 
are chosen with a view to their appropriateness for later work in analytic 
geometry and calculus. 164 is a prerequisite to 165 and 166. 165 and 
166 may be taken concurrently. 

Sections of conversation for 1 hour of credit are available with each language 
listed below but on an elective basis. 

173-3, 174-3, 175-3. ELEMENTARY FRENCH. No previous knowledge of 

French required. Courses should be taken in sequence. 
176-3, 177-3, 178-3. ELEMENTARY GERMAN. No previous knowledge of 

German required. Courses should be taken in sequence. 
186-3, 187-3, 188-3. ELEMENTARY RUSSIAN. No previous knowledge of 

Russian required. Courses should be taken in sequence. 
190-3, 191-3, 192-3. ELEMENTARY SPANISH. No previous knowledge of 

Spanish required. Courses should be taken in sequence. 

GSE HEALTH AND PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT 

For Physical Education courses, refer to the Edwardsville Announce- 
ments issue of the Southern Illinois University Bulletin. General Studies 
requirements include three hours in physical education. 

251-3. HEALTHFUL LIVING. Personal and community health. Presents 
scientific health information as a basis for helping the student develop 
wholesome health attitudes snd practices. Required of all students. 



GENERAL STUDIES 



17 



FRESHMAN AND SOPHOMORE 
GENERAL STUDIES REQUIREMENTS 

In the following summary of first and second level General Studies courses, 
little "or" indicates a choice within a sequence, while capital "OR" indi- 
cates a choice of sequence. 



Carbondale Campus 



GSA-1: 
GSA-2: 


: 101 (Physics) 
: 201 (Biology) 


102 
202 


(Physics-Chemistry) 
(Biology) 


103 
203 

200 


(Chemistry) 
(Biology) 

or 
(Geology) 


GSB-1: 
GSB-2: 


101 (History) 

201 (Anthropology) 


102 
202 


(History) 
(Psychology) 

OR 
(Government) 


103 
203 


(Geography) 
(Sociology) 




211 (Eonomics) 


212 


213 


(Econ-Govt) 


GSC-1: 


: 100 (Music) 


102 


(Philosophy) 


103 


(Literature) 


GSC-2: 


101 (Art) 

110 (West. Human.) 

201 (Drama) 
or 

202 (Poetry) 
or 

203 (Theater) 


OR 

111 (West. Human.) 

204 (Art) 

or 

205 (Design) 

or 

206 (Music) 


112 

207 

208 
209 


(West. Human.) 
(Philosophy) 

or 
(Philosophy) 

or 
(Modern Lit) 




2 1 1 (Orien. Human. ) 


212 


OR 

(Orien. Human.) 


210 
213 


(Fiction) 
(Orien. Human.) 


GSD: 

GSD: 


101 (Composition) 
108 (Math) 


102 
109 


(Composition) 

AND 
(Math) 


103 (Speech) 
110 (Statistics) 




114 (Algebra) 

A three term sequence in 


OR 

115 (Algebra) 

OR 
a foreign language 


110b (Statistics) 
116 (Trigonometry) 


GSE-1: 


101 (Swimming) 












102 (if swim test is passed) 
and 103 


and two more hours of P.E., 


, excluding 101, 102, 


GSE-2: 


or 
103 (if swim test is passed) 
201 (Health Education) 









18 



SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



Edwardsville Campus 



GSA-1: 151 (Physics) 
GSA-2: 251 (Zoology) 



152 (Physics and Chemistry) 
252 (Zoology and Botany) 

or 
255 (Geography) 



GSB-1: 151 (Geography) 
GSB-2: 251 (Anthropology) 

255 (Economics) 



152 (History) 
252 (Sociology) 

OR 
256 (Government) 



153 (Chemistry) 
253 (Botany) 

or 
255 (Geography) 



153 (History) 
253 (Psychology) 

257 (Econ-Govt) 



GSC-1: 151 (Poetry) 



GSC-2: 251 (Literature and 
Philosophy) 



152 (Philosophy) 



252 (Literature and 

Philosophy) 
or 

253 (Literature and 

Philosophy) 



153 (Art) 

or 

154 (Music) 

253 (Literature and 

Philosophy) 
or 
252 (Literature and 
Philosophy) 
or 

254 (Theater) 

or 

255 (Music) 



GSD: 151 (English 

Composition) 

GSD: 155 (Mathematics) 

164 (Algebra) 



152 (English 

Composition) 
AND 
156 (Mathematics) 

O R 
165 (Algebra) 
O R 
A three term sequence in a foreign language 



153 (Speech) 

157 (Mathematics) 
166 (Trigonometry) 



GSE-1: Three hours of physical education 
GSE-2: 251 (Health Education) 



CURRICULUM GUIDES 

The following curriculum guides are to be used for the first two years 
of the various four-year bachelor's degree programs offered by the Univer- 
sity. Students should consult with academic advisers about courses to com- 
plete their programs. They should also refer to the various issues of the 
Southern Illinois University Bulletin. 

If a curriculum is called "preprofessional" it does not lead to a degree 
at Southern. Students enrolled in such curricula transfer to professional 
schools after a year or more. 



BACHELOR'S DEGREE CURRICULA, CARBONDALE 



19 



Carbondale Campus 



UNDECIDED MAJOR 



FALL HOURS 

GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 101 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 

Elective _3 

16 

GSA 201 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSD Math or FL "'.."'"'" 3 

GSE 201 3 

USAF J. 

16 



ALL ACADEMIC UNITS AT CARBONDALE 



First Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 

Elective 3 

16 
Second Year 

GSA 202 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSD Math or FL 3 

Elective 3 

USAF J 

16 



SPRING HOURS 
GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 1 

Elective _3 

17 



GSA 203 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSD Math or FL 3 

Elective 3 

USAF _0 

15 



ACCOUNTING 



FALL HOURS 
GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 101 3 

GSD 108 or 114 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _0 

16 

GSA-2 3 

GSB 211 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSE 201 3 

USAF 1 

Acct 251 _4 

17 



First Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSD 109 or 115 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _0 

16 
Second Year 

GSA-2 3 

GSB 212 3 

GSC-2 3 

Econ 214 3 

USAF 1 

Acct 252 _4 

17 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 



SPRING HOURS 
GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSD HOB 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 2. 

17 

GSA-2 3 

GSB 213 3 

GSC-2 3 

Econ 215 3 

USAF 

Acct 253 _4 

16 



AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 



SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE 



FALL HOURS 
GSA 101 3 

GSB 101 (waive) 

GSC 100 or 101 3 

GSD 101 3 

GSD 108 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 

Agl 114 _4 

17 



First Year 



WINTER HOURS 

GSA 102 3 

GSB 102 (waive) 

GSB 211 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSD 109 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 

P1I 103 _4 

17 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA 103 3 

GSB 103 (waive) 

GSB 212 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSD HOB 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 1 

AnI 105 or 231 J 

18 



20 



SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



GSA 201 3 

GSB 201 3 

GSB 213 3 

GSC 102 3 

USAF 1 

AnI 315 _4 

17 
Missing: GSC-2 (6 hours). 



Second Year 

GSA 202 3 

GSB 202 3 

GSC 103 3 

Acct 250 4 

USAF 1 

Agl 354 _4 

18 



GSA 203 3 

GSB 203 3 

GSC 201, 202, or 203 .. 3 

GSE 201 3 

USAF 

Agl 350 _5 

17 



AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION, VOCATIONAL 

First Year 



SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE 



FALL HOURS 
GSA 101 3 

GSB 101 (waive) 

GSC 100 or 101 3 

GSD 101 3 

GSD 108 or 114 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 

Agl 114 _4 

17 



GSA 201 3 

GSB 201 3 

GSB 211 3 

USAF 1 

AnI 231 4 

Agl 375 3 



17 



WINTER HOURS 

GSA 102 3 

GSB 102 (waive) 

GSC 102 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSD 109 or 115 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 

P1I 103 _4 

17 
Second Year 

GSA 202 3 

GSB 202 3 

GSB 212 3 

USAF 1 

AnI 315 4 

Agl 210 _2 

16 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA 103 3 

GSB 103 (waive) 

GSC 103 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSD 110 or 116 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 1 

AnI 105 _4 

18 

GSA 203 3 

GSB 203 3 

GSB 213 3 

USAF 

Agl 215 4 

P1I 309 _5 

18 



Missing: GSC-2 sequence and GSE 201. 
AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING SERVICES 



SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE 



First Year 



FALL 




HOURS 


WINTER 


HOURS 


SPRING 


HOURS 


GSA 101 .... 




3 


GSA 102 


3 


GSA 103 


3 


GSB-1 (waive) .. 





GSB-1 (waive) .... 





GSB-1 (waive) 











GSB 211 


3 


GSB 212 


3 


GSC 100 or 


101 


3 










GSD 101 




3 


GSD 102 


3 


GSD 103 


3 


GSD 108 or 


114. 


3 


GSD 109 or 115 


3 


GSD 110 or 116 


3 


GSEPE 




1 


GSEPE 


1 


GSE PE 


1 


FC 







FC 





FC 





USAF 







USAF 





USAF 


1 


Agl 114 




4 

17 


P1I 103 

Second Y 


4 

17 
ear 


Agl 215 


4 

18 


GSA 201 . 




3 


GSA 202 


3 


GSA 203 


3 


GSB 213 ... 




3 




3 






GSC 102 ... 




3 


GSC 103 


3 


GSC-2 


3 


USAF 




1 


USAF 


1 


USAF 





AnI 105 ... 




4 


AnI 315 


4 


GSE 201 


3 


Agl 375 




3 


Agl 354 


4 


Agl 303 


4 








Agl 214 


2 


Mktg 337 


4 






17 




17 




17 



Missing: GSC-2 (6 hours) 



BACHELOR'S DEGREE CURRICULA, CARBONDALE 



21 



AGRICULTURE, GENERAL 



SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE 



FALL 
GSA-1 


HOURS 

3 


GSB-1 (waive) . 

GSD 101 

GSD Math 

GSE PE 




3 

3 

.. 1 


FC 


.... 


USAF 


.. 


Electives 1 

GSA-2 


4-8 

14-18 

.. 3 


GSB-2 


.. 3 


GSC-1 


. 3 


USAF 


.. 1 


Electives 2 


4-8 



First Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSA-1 3 



GSB-1 (waive) ... 

GSD 102 

GSD Math 

GSE PE 




3 

3 

1 


FC 





USAF 





Electives 1 4-8 

14-18 
Second Year 
GSA-2 3 


GSB-2 


3 


GSC-1 


.. 3 


USAF 


.. 1 


Electives 2 


4-8 



14-18 
Missing: GSC-2 sequence and GSE 201. 



14-18 



SPRING HOURS 
GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 (waive) 

GSD 103 3 

GSD Math 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 1 

Electives 1 3-7 

14-18 

GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-1 3 

USAF 

Electives 2 5-9 

14-18 



1 Agl 114, 145, 214, 215; AnI 105, 125, 231; For 104, 221; P1I 103, 264. 

2 AgI 303, 350, 373, 375; AnI 315, 311, 312, 313, 332, 337; For 360; P1I 302, 304, 306A, 

306B, 309, 316, 318, 324. 



ANIMAL INDUSTRIES 



FALL HOURS 

GSA 101 (waive) J 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSD 101 3 

GSD Math 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 

Agri 2 4 

17 

GSA 201 3 

GSB 211 3 

GSC 100 or 101 3 

GSC-2 3 

USAF 1 

Electives in Agri 4 

17 
Missing: GSE 201 



SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE 



First Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSA 102 (waive) x 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSD Math 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 

Agri 2 _4 

17 
Second Year 

GSA 202 3 

GSB 212 3 

GSC 102 3 

GSC-2 3 

USAF 1 

Electives in Agri 4 

17 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA 103 (waive) ' 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSD Math 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 1 

Agri 2 _4 

18 

GSA 203 3 

GSB 213 3 

GSC 103 3 

GSC-2 3 

USAF 

Electives in Agri 4 

Y6 



1 Students with excellent science backgrounds may waive GSA 101, 102, 103 and substi- 
tute Chemistry 111, 112, and 113 or 305. Such students may be interested in following 
the Agricultural Science option as noted in the School of Agriculture bulletin. 

2 At least one of the following courses in agriculture is to be selected from a different de- 
partment each quarter: AnI 105, 125, 231, Agl 114, P1I 103. 



22 



SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



ANTHROPOLOGY 



FALL HOURS 

GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 101 3 

GSD 108 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _0 

16 

GSA 201 3 

GSB 201 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSD FL 3 

GSE 201 3 

USAF J. 

16 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 

First Year 



WINTER 


HOURS 


SPRING 


HOURS 


GSA-1 


3 


GSA-1 


3 


GSB-1 


3 


GSB-1 


3 


GSC-1 


3 


GSC-1 


3 


GSD 102 


3 


GSD 103 


3 


GSD 109 


3 


GSD 110 


3 


GSE 


1 


GSE 


1 


FC 





FC 





USAF 





USAF 


1 




16 




17 


Second 


Year 






GSA 202 


3 


GSA 203 


3 


GSB 202 


3 


GSB 203 


3 


GSC-2 


3 

3 


GSC-2 


3 


GSD FL 


GSD FL 


3 


Elective 


3 


Elective 


3 


USAF 


1 


USAF 







16 




15 



APPAREL DESIGN 



SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS 



First Year 



FALL 


HOURS 


WINTER 


HOURS 


SPRING 


HOURS 


GSB 101 


3 


GSB 102 


3 


GSB 103 


3 


GSC 101 


3 


GSC 102 


3 


GSC 103 


3 


GSD 101 


3 


GSD 102 


3 


GSD 103 


3 


GSE PE 


1 


GSE PE 


.. 1 


GSE PE 


1 


FC 





FC 





FC 





C&T 131 


3 


C&T 127 


4 


C&T 231 


3 


HEEd 111 


2 


C&T 135 


3 


H&F 227 


3 




15 


Second Y 


17 

ear 




16 


GSA 101 


3 


GSA 102 


3 


GSA 103 


3 


GSB 201 


3 


GSB 202 


3 


GSB 203 


3 


GSC 201, 202, 


or 203 .. 3 


GSC 204 or 205 

GSE 201 


3 

3 


GSC 207 


3 


H&F 237 


3 


C&T 323 


... 2 


Art 241 


4 


Electives 


5 


C&T 327 


3 


C&T 233 


3 



17 17 16 

Missing: GSA-2 sequence and GSD Math or FL (and USAF which is required only of 
men). 



APPLIED SCIENCE 
GSA-1 (waive) 

GSA-2 a 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 101 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 

Math 150 1 A 

17 



First Year 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSA-2 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 

Math 251 J _5 

18 



SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSA-2 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 103 3 

FC 

USAF 1 

Math 252 1 _5 

18 



BACHELOR'S DEGREE CURRICULA, CARBONDALE 



23 



GSA-3 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSB-3 3 

GSC-2 3 



USAF 1 

Phys211 5 



Second Year 

GSA-3 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSB-3 3 

GSC-2 3 



USAF 1 

Phys 212 5 



Elective 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSE PE 1 

GSE 201 3 

USAF 

Phys 213 5 



18 18 

1 One who has not received advanced standing must take GSD 114, 115, 116. 



18 



ART EDUCATION 



FALL HOURS 
GSA 101 3 

GSB 101 3 

GSC-1 (waive) 

GSD 101 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 

Art 100 _6 

16 



GSA 201 
GSC-2 1 



First Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSA 102 3 

GSB 102 3 

GSC-1 (waive) 

GSD 102 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 

Art 100 _6 

16 
Second Year 

GSA 202 3 

GSC-2 1 3 

USAF 1 

Art 200 6 

Art 226 3 



USAF 1 

Art 200 6 

Art 225 _3 

16 16 

Missing: GSB-2 sequence and GSD Math or FL. 
1 Choices within the second and third sequences of GSC should be in Art. 



SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA 103 3 

GSB 103 3 

GSC-1 (waive) 

GSD 103 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 1 

Art 100 _6 

17 

GSA 203 3 

GSC-2 1 3 

GSE 201 3 

USAF 

Art 200 6 

Art 227 3 



18 



ART 



FALL HOURS 

GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 (waive) 

GSD 101 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 

Art 100 _6 

16 

GSA-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

USAF 1 

Art 200 6 

Art 225 _3 

16 



First 



a r 



WINTER HOURS 

GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 (waive) 

GSD 102 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 

Art 100 _6 

16 
Second Year 

GSA-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

USAF 1 

Art 200 6 

Art 226 _3 

16 



SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS 



SPRING HOURS 
GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 (waive) 

GSD 103 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 1 

Art 100 _6 

17 

GSA-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSE 201 3 

USAF 

Art 200 6 

Art 227 _3 

18 



Missing: GSB-2 sequence and GSD Math or FL. 



24 



SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 



FALL HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSA 201 3 

GSB 101 3 

GSC 110 3 

GSD 101 3 

GSD 108 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _0 

16 

GSB 201 3 

GSD FL 3 

USAF 1 

Chem 110 4 

Zool 102 _5 

16 
Missing: GSC-2 sequence. 



First Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSA 202 3 

GSB 102 3 

GSC 111 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSD 109 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _0 

16 
Second Year 

GSB 202 3 

GSD FL 3 

USAF 1 

Chem 240 4 

Zool 103 _5 

16 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSA 203 3 

GSB 103 3 

GSC 112 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSD 110 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF J 

17 

GSB 203 3 

GSD FL 3 

GSE 201 3 

USAF 

Chem 350 4 

Phsl209 _5 

18 



BOTANY 



FALL HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSB 101 3 

GSC 100 or 101 3 

GSD 101 3 

GSD 108 or 114 3 

GSEPE 1 

FC 

USAF 

Chem 110 J 

17 

GSA 201 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSD FL 3 

USAF 1 

Electives 4-5 

17-18 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



First Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSB 102 3 

GSC 102 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSD 109 or 115 3 

GSEPE 1 

FC 

USAF 

Chem 240 _4 

17 
Second Year 

GSA 202 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSD FL 3 

USAF 1 

Electives 4-5 

17-18 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSB 103 3 

GSC 103 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSE 201 3 

GSEPE 1 

FC 

USAF 1 

Chem 350 _4 

18 



GSA 203 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSD FL 3 

USAF 

Electives 4-5 



16-17 



BUSINESS TEACHER EDUCATION 



FALL HOURS 
GSA 101 3 

GSB 101 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 101 3 

GSD 108 or 114 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _0 

16 



First Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSA 102 3 

GSB 102 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSD 109 or 115 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _0 

16 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA 103 3 

GSB 103 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSD 110b 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF J_ 

17 



BACHELOR'S DEGREE CURRICULA, CARBONDALE 



25 



GSA 201 3 

GSB 211 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSB 202 3 

GSE 201 3 

USAF 1 



Second 
GSA 202 


Year 
3 


GSB 212 


3 


GSC-2 


3 


Econ 214 

Sec 203 * 


3 

3- 


USAF 


1 



GSA 203 3 

GSB 213 3 

GSC-2 3 

Econ 215 3 

Mgt 170 4 

USAF 



16 16 16 

Students who have not had Sec 201 and 202 (or the equivalent) must take these two 
courses before taking Sec 203. See course descriptions in the School of Business bulletin 
for prerequisites and placement in typewriting and shorthand courses. 



CHEMISTRY (a.C.S. APPROVED) COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 

First Year 

SPRING HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSB 103 3 

GSD 103 3 

Math 150 5 

GSEPE 1 

FC 

USAF 1 

Chem 113 5 



FALL 


HOURS 


WINTER t 


IOURS 


GSA-1 (waive) .. 





GSA-1 (waive) 





GSB 101 


3 


GSB 102 


3 


GSD 101 


3 


GSD 102 


3 


GSD 114 


3 


GSD 115 and 116 


6 


GSEPE 


1 


GSEPE 


1 


FC 





FC 





USAF 





USAF 





Chem 111 


5 


Chem 112 


5 



15 

USAF 1 

Chem 221 3 

Chem 341 4 

Math 251 5 

Phys 206 (or 211) _5 

18 



18 
Second Year 
USAF 1 

Chem 342 5 

Math 252 5 

Phys 208 (or 213) J5 

16 



18 

USAF 

GSE 201 3 

Chem 343 5 

Math 253 4 

Phys 207 (or 212) _5 

17 



Missing: GSA-2, GSB-2, GSC-1, and GSC-2 sequences. 



CHEMISTRY (TEACHING CERTIFICATE WITH A TEACHING MINOR IN 
PHYSICS) COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



FALL 

GSA-1 (waive) .. 
GSC 101 


HOURS 



. 3 


GSD 101 ... . 


3 


GSD 114 


3 


GSE PE 


1 


FC 





USAF 






First Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSC 102 3 

GSD 102 3 



Chem 111 _5 

15 

GSB 101 3 

USAF 1 

Chem 221 3 

Chem 341 4 

Phys 206 5 



GSD 115 .. 
GSE PE ... 

FC 

USAF 

Chem 112 



Second Year 



GSB 102 3 

USAF 1 

GSE 201 3 

Chem 342 5 

Phys 208 _5 

16 17 

Missing: GSA-2, GSB-2, and GSC-2 (except 201) sequences. 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSC 103 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSD 116 3 



GSE 

FC 

USAF 



PE 



Chem 113 _5 

16 

GSB 103 3 

USAF 

GSC 201 3 

Chem 343 5 

Phys 207 _5 

16 



26 



SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



CHEMISTRY 



FALL 



HOURS 



GSA-1 (waive) 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 101 3 

GSD 114 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 

Chem 111 _5 

15 

GSB 103 3 

GSC-2 3 

USAF 1 

Chem 305 4 

Math 251 5 



First 

WINTER HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) .. 

GSB 101 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSD 115 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 

Chem 112 _5 

18 
Second 

GSB 201 3 

GSC-2 3 

USAF 1 

Chem 306 4 

Math 252 5 



16 
Missing: GSA-2 sequence. 



16 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

Year 

SPRING HOURS SUMMER HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) .. GSB 202 3 

GSB 102 3 

GSC-1 3 GSC-2 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSD 116 3 Math 150 5 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 1 

Chem 113 _5 Chem 221 _3 

16 17 

Year 

GSB 203 3 

GSE 201 3 

USAF 

Chem 350 4 

Math 320 3 

SEd 310 _4 

17 



CLOTHING AND TEXTILES MERCHANDISING SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS 

First Year 



FALL 

GSB 101 

GSC 101 

GSD 101 

GSE PE 

FC 

C&T 131 

HEEd 111 


HOURS 
3 

3 

3 

1 



3 

2 


WINTER 

GSB 102 ... 
GSC 102 
GSD 102 
GSE PE 

FC 

C&T 127 
C&T 135 




HOURS 
3 

3 

3 

1 



4 

3 


SPRING 

GSB 103 

GSC 103 

GSD 103 

GSE PE 

FC 

C&T 231 or 331 

H&F 227 


HOURS 
3 

3 

3 

1 



3 

3 






15 


S e c o n 


d Y 


17 
ear 




16 


GSA 101 

GSB 201 


or 203 


.. 3 
.. 3 
.. 3 
.. 5 
.. 3 


GSA 102 ... 
GSB 202 ... 
GSC 204 or 
Acct 250 ... 
C&T 300 ... 


205 ".'.'.'. 


3 

3 

3 

4 

2 


GSA 103 

GSB 203 


3 

3 


GSC 201, 202, 

Mktg 230 

H&F 237 


GSC 207 

GSE 201 

C&T 233 


3 

3 

3 






17 






15 




15 



Missing: GSA-2, GSD Math or FL sequences. 



DESIGN 



FALL HOURS 
GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 101 3 

GSD Math 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 

Des 100 _5 

18 



First Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSD Math 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 

Des 100 5 

"18 



SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS 



SPRING HOURS 
GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSD Math 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 1 

Des 100 _5 

19 



BACHELOR'S DEGREE CURRICULA, CARBONDALE 



27 



GSA-1 


3 


GSB-2 


3 


GSC-2 


3 


USAF 


1 


Des 200 

Des 215 

Des 275 


2 

4 

4 



20 



Second Year 

GSA-1 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

USAF 1 

Des 200 2 

Des 215 4 

Des 275 _4 

20 



GSA-1 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

USAF 

Des 200 2 

Des 215 4 

Des 275 _4 

1-9 



Missing: GSA-2 sequence and GSE 201, 



DIETETICS 



FALL HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 101 3 

GSD 108 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

F&N 105 _4 

17 



GSB 211 3 

GSC 201, 202, or 203 .. 3 



SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS 



Chem 110 
C&T 251 . 
Phsl 209 



First 



WINTER HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSD 109 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

H&F227 _3 

16 

3 
3 



Second Year 

GSB 212 

GSC 204 or 205 



Chem 240 4 

F&N 206 4 

Acct 250 4 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSA 201 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSD 110 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

16 

GSB 213 3 

GSC 207, 208, or 209 .. 3 

GSE 201 3 

Chem 350 4 

H&F 237 3 



18 18 

Missing: GSA 202 and 203 (also USAF, which is required of men only), 



16 



EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 



FALL HOURS 
GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 (waive) 

GSC 100 1 3 

GSD 101 3 

GSD Math 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC _0 

16 



GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC 201 or 203 3 

GSD Math or elective .. 3 

GSE 201 3 

Mus 040 1 



First Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 (waive) 

GSC 101 a 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSD Math 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC _0 

16 
Second Year 

GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC 204 or 205 3 

GSD Math or elective .. 3 

Elective 3 

Mus 040 1 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



SPRING HOURS 
GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 (waive) 

GSC 103 1 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSD Math 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC _0 

16 

GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC 207 or 210 3 

GSD Math or elective .. 3 

Elective 3 

Mus 040 1 



16 16 16 

Missing: USAF, which is required only of men. 

1 GSC 100, 101, and 103 in the first year are required for the major, but they do not 
constitute a first-level sequence in General Studies. 



28 



SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



ECONOMICS 



FALL HOURS 
GSA 101 3 

GSB 101 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 101 3 

GSD 108 or 114 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _0 

16 

GSA-2 3 

GSB 211 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSE 201 3 

USAF 1 

Acct 251 _4 

17 



First Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSA 102 3 

GSB 102 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSD 109 or 115 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF J) 

16 
Second Year 

GSA-2 3 

GSB 212 3 

GSC-2 3 

Econ 214 3 

USAF 1 

Acct 252 _4 

17 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA 103 3 

GSB 103 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSD 110b 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF J. 

17 

GSA-2 3 

GSB 213 3 

GSC-2 3 

Econ 215 3 

USAF 

Acct 253 _4 

16 



ECONOMICS 



FALL HOURS 

GSA 101 3 

GSB 101 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 101 3 

GSD 108 or 114 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _0 

16 

GSA-2 3 

GSB 211 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSD FL 3 

GSE 201 3 

USAF J. 

16 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 

First Year 



WINTER HOURS 

GSA 102 3 

GSB 102 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSD 109 or 115 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _0 

16 



Second 

GSA-2 

GSB 212 

GSC-2 

GSD FL 

Econ 214 

USAF 



3 
3 

. 3 
3 
3 

_1 

16 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA 103 3 

GSB 103 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSD 110b 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF J_ 

17 



GSA-2 3 

GSB 213 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSD FL 3 

Econ 215 3 

USAF 



15 



ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 



FALL HOURS 
GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 (waive) 

GSC 100 1 3 

GSD 101 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

Elective 3 

16 



First Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 (waive) 

GSC 101 a 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

Elective 3 

16 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



SPRING HOURS 
GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 (waive) 

GSC 103 1 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

Elective _3 

16 



BACHELOR'S DEGREE CURRICULA, CARBONDALE 



29 







Second Year 






GSA-2 

GSB-2 

GSC-2 

GSD 108 

GSE 201 


3 

3 

3 

3 

3 


GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSD 109 _ 3 

American History 3 


GSA-2 

GSB-2 

GSC-2 

GSD 110 

Guidance 305 


3 

3 

3 

3 

4 



15 15 16 

Missing: USAF, which is required of men only. 

X GSC 100, 101, and 103 are required for the major, but they do not constitute a first- 
level sequence in GSC. GSC-1 is waived. 



ENGLISH 




cc 


)LLEC 


,E OF EDUCATION OB 

First Year 


LIBI 


:ral arts Ar> 


rD sci 


ENCES 


FALL 




HOURS 


WINTER HOURS 


SPRING 




HOURS 


GSA-1 






.. 3 


GSA-1 


... 3 


GSA-1 




3 


GSB-1 






.. 3 


GSB-1 


... 3 


GSB-1 




3 


GSC 100, 


101, 


or 110 


.. 3 


GSC 102 or 111 


... 3 


GSC 103 or 


112 . 


3 


GSD 101 . 






.. 3 


GSD 102 


... 3 


GSD 103 .... 




3 


GSD FL 






. 3 


GSD FL 


... 3 


GSD FL 




3 


GSE PE 






.. 1 


GSE PE 


... 1 


GSE PE 




1 


FC 






.. 


FC 


... 


FC 







USAF 






. 
16 


USAF 

Second Yea 


... 
16 
r 


USAF 




1 

17 


GSA 201 . 






.. 3 


GSA 202 


... 3 


GSA 203 .... 




3 


GSB-2 






.. 3 


GSB-2 


... 3 


GSB-2 




3 


GSC 202 . 






.. 3 


GSC-2 


... 3 


GSC 210 




3 


GSE 201 . 






. 3 












USAF 






.. 1 


USAF 


... 1 


USAF 







Electives 1 






.. 3 
16 


Electives 1 


... 6 
16 


Electives 1 .. 




6-7 

15-16 


1 Recommended 


electives: English 300, 390; foreign 


language on the 200 level; 


courses 



in the minor, in education, mathematics, philosophy, science. 



FOODS IN BUSINESS 



SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS 



First Yea 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSB 103 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSD 110 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

H&F 237 3 

16 

GSA-2 3 

GSB 213 3 

GSC 207, 208, or 209 .. 3 

Chem 350 4 

R-T 161 _4 

16 17 17 

Missing: GSE PE (1 hour) and GSE 201 (also USAF, which is required only of men). 



FALL 


HOURS 


WINTER 


HOURS 


GSA-1 (waive) .. 




.. 


GSA-1 (waive) .... 





GSB 101 




. 3 


GSB 102 


3 


GSC-1 




.. 3 


GSC-1 


3 


GSD 101 




. 3 


GSD 102 


3 


GSD 108 




. 3 


GSD 109 

GSE PE 


3 

1 


FC 




.. 


FC 





F&N 105 




.. 4 


H&F 227 


3 


HEEd 111 




.. 2 

18 


Second Y 


16 

ear 


GSA-2 




.. 3 


GSA-2 


3 


GSB 211 




.. 3 


GSB 212 


3 


GSC 201, 202, or 


203 


.. 3 


GSC 204 or 205 ... 


3 


Chem 110 




.. 4 


Chem 240 


.. 4 


C&T 251 




3 


F&N 206 


4 



30 



SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



FOREIGN LANGUAGE 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION OR LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



First 



FALL 


HOURS 


WINTER 


HOURS 


GSA-1 


3 


GSA-1 


3 


GSB-1 


3 


GSB-1 


3 


GSC-1 


3 


GSC-1 


3 


GSD 101 


3 


GSD 102 


3 


GSD FL 


3 


GSD FL 


3 


GSE PE 


1 


GSE PE 


1 


FC 





FC 





USAF 





USAF 







16 




16 






Second 


Year 


GSA-2 


3 


GSA-2 


3 


GSB-2 


3 


GSB-2 


3 


GSC-2 


3 


GSC-2 


3 


GSE 201 


3 


Elective 


3 


USAF 


.. 1 


USAF 


1 


FL 


3-5 


FL 


3-5 



SPRING HOURS 
GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSD FL 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF J_ 

17 



GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

Elective 3 

USAF 

FL 3-5 



16-18 



16-18 



15-17 



FORESTRY 



FALL 

GSA 201 
GSB 101 



SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE 



HOURS 
3 

3 



GSD 101 3 

GSD 114 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 

For 104 _3 

16 



GSA 101 * 3 

GSB 211 3 

GSC 103 3 

USAF 1 

Agl 303 4 

For 221 and 222 _4 

18 
Missing: GSC-2 (6 hours). 



Second Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSA 202 3 

GSB 102 3 

GSC 101 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSD 115 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 

Agl 214 _2 

18 
Second Year 

GSA 102 1 3 

GSB 212 3 

GSD 110 3 

USAF 1 

P1I 301 4 

For 363 4 



18 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA 203 3 

GSB 103 3 

GSC 102 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSD 116 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 1 



17 

GSA 103 1 3 

GSB 213 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSE 201 3 

USAF 

Bot 320 5 

17 



*A desirable equivalent for GSA 101, 102, 103 is Chemistry 110, 230, 240, or 111, 112, 
305. This would cause the fall load for the second year to be 19-20 hours; drop Forestry 
221 to bring in line. 



BACHELOR'S DEGREE CURRICULA, CARBONDALE 



31 



GENERAL SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS IN JUNIOR HIGH 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



FALL HOURS 
GSA 101 3 

GSB 101 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 101 3 

GSD 114 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _0 

16 



GSA 201 3 

GSB 211 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSE 201 3 

USAF 1 

Math 150 5 



First Year 



18 



WINTER 

GSA 102 


HOURS 
3 


GSB 102 


. 3 


GSC-1 


.. 3 


GSD 102 

GSD 115 


3 

3 


GSE PE 


1 


FC 





USAF . 


. ... 


Second 
GSA 202 


16 
Year 
3 


GSB 212 


3 


GSC-2 


3 


GSB 202 


3 


USAF 


1 


Math 251 


_5 

18 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA 103 3 

GSB 103 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSD 116 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF J_ 

17 



GSA 203 3 

GSB 213 3 

GSC-2 3 

Eng391 or 300 3-A 

USAF 

Math 252 5 



17-18 



GEOGRAPHY 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



First Year 



FALL 


HOURS 


WINTER 


HOURS 


GSA-1 


3 


GSA-1 


3 


GSB-1 


3 


GSB-1 


3 


GSC-1 


3 


GSC-1 


3 


GSD 101 


3 


GSD 102 


3 


GSD FL 


3 


GSD FL 


3 


GSE PE 


1 


GSE PE 


1 


FC 





FC 





USAF 





USAF 







16 




16 






Second Y 


ear 


GSA 200 ' 


3 


GSA 201 


3 


GSB-2 


3 


GSB-2 


3 


GSC-2 


3 


GSC-2 


3 


GSE 201 


3 


GSD 108 or 114 .. 


3 


USAF 


1 


USAF 


1 


Geog201 


5 


Geog210 


4 



18 
1 GSA 200 is required for the major. 



17 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSD FL 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _1 

17 



GSA 202 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSD 109 or 115 3 

USAF 

Geog250 _4 

16 



32 



SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



GEOLOGY 

FALL 

GSA-1 (waive) . 
GSB 101 


HOURS 


3 


GSC 100, 101, or 
GSD 101 


110 


. 3 
3 


GSD FL 




3 


GSD 114 




3 


GSE PE 




1 


FC 







USAF 







GSA 201 




16 
3 


GSB 201 or 211 . 
USAF 




. 3 

1 


Chem 111 5 

Geol 220 _5 

17 
Missing: GSC-2 (3 hours) 

GOVERNMENT 

FALL HOURS 

GSA 101 3 


GSB 101 




3 


GSC-1 




3 


GSD 101 




3 


GSD 108 or FL ... 

GSE PE 




.. 3 
1 


FC 







USAF 








COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



First Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSB 102 3 

GSC 102 or 111 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSD FL 3 

GSD 115 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _0 

16 
Second Year 

GSA 202 3 

GSB 202 or 212 3 

GSC 204, 205, or 206 .. 3 

USAF 1 

Chem 112 5 

Geol 221 _5 

20 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSB 103 3 

GSC 103 or 112 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSD FL 3 

GSD 116 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF J. 

17 



GSA 203 3 

GSB 203 or 213 3 

GSC 207, 208, 209, 210 3 

USAF 

Chem 113 5 

Geol 302 4 



18 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



16 

GSA 201 3 

GSB 201 % 211 2 , or 212 3 

GSC-2 (not 207) 3 

GSD Math or FL 3 

USAF 1 

Govt 231 * or 
Hist 201 2 5 



Missing: GSE 201 



18 



First Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSA 102 3 

GSB 102 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSD 109 or FL 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _0 

16 
Second Year 

GSA 202 3 

GSB 202 \ 212, or 211 2 3 

GSC-2 (not 207) 3 

GSD Math or FL 3 

USAF 1 

Govt 232 * or 
Hist 202 2 _5 

18 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA 103 3 

GSB 103 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSD 110 or FL 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _1 

17 



GSA 203 3 

GSB 203 1 or 213 2 3 

GSC-2 (not 207) 3 

GSD Math or FL 3 

USAF 

Hist 201 1 or Govt 232 2 
(or Govt 243 & 330) _5 

17 



'One who takes the GSB 201-203 sequence should also take Govt 231, 232, Hist 201. 
2 One who takes the GSB 211-213 sequence should also take Hist 201, 202, Govt 232. 



BACHELOR'S DEGREE CURRICULA, CARBONDALE 



33 



HEALTH EDUCATION (ELEMENTARY) 

First Year 



FALL 




HOURS 


WINTER 


HOURS 


GSA 101 ... 




3 


GSA 102 


3 


GSB 101 ... 




3 


GSB 102 


3 


GSC 100 or 


101 .... 


3 


GSC 102 


3 


GSD 101 .... 




3 


GSD 102 


3 


GSE PE .... 




1 


GSE PE 


1 


FC 







FC 





USAF 







USAF 





Elective 




J 

16 


Elective 

Second 


_3 

16 
Year 


GSA 201 .... 




3 


GSA 202 


3 


GSB 201 .... 




3 


GSB 202 


3 


GSC-2 (not 


211) 


3 


GSC-2 


3 


GSD Math 




3 


GSD Math 


3 


GSE 201 .... 




3 


HEd 205 


4 


USAF 




1 


USAF 


1 



16 



17 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA 103 3 

GSB 103 3 

GSC 103 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 1 

Elective _3 

17 

GSA 203 3 

GSB 203 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSD Math 3 

HEd 334S or 300 4-3 

USAF 

15-16 



HEALTH EDUCATION (SECONDARY) 

First 

FALL HOURS 

GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 101 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 

Elective 3 

16 

GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSD Math 3 

GSE 201 3 

USAF 1 



Year 



WINTER 

GSA-1 


HOURS 

3 


GSB-1 


3 


GSC-1 


3 


GSD 102 


3 


GSE PE 


.... 1 


FC 


.. 


USAF 


.. 


Elective 


3 


Second 
GSA-2 


16 
Year 
3 


GSB-2 


3 


GSC-2 


. 3 


GSD Math 

HEd 205 


3 

. 4 


USAF 


1 



16 



17 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



SPRING HOURS 
GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 1 

Ed Ad 100 _3 

17 

GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSD Math 3 

HEd 300or334S 3-4 

USAF 

Elective, toward minor 2-3 

17-18 



34 



SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



HEALTH SCIENCE 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 

First Year 



FALL 


HOURS 


WINTER 


HOURS 


SPRING 


HOURS 


GSA-1 (waive) . 





GSA-1 (waive) .. 





GSA-1 (waive) . 





GSA 201 


3 


GSA 202 


3 


GSA 203 


3 


GSB 101 


3 


GSB 102 


3 


GSB 103 


3 


GSC 100 or 101 . 


3 


GSC 102 


3 


GSC 103 


3 


GSD 101 


3 


GSD 102 


3 


GSD 103 


3 


GSD 108 


3 


GSD 109 


3 


GSD 110 


3 


GSE PE 


1 


GSE PE 


1 


GSE PE 


1 


FC 





FC 





FC 





USAF 





USAF 





USAF 


1 




16 


Second Y 


16 

ear 




17 






GSB 202 


3 


GSB 203 


3 


GSB 211 


3 


GSB 212 


3 


GSB 213 


3 


GSC-2 


3 


GSC-2 


3 


GSC-2 


3 


GSD FL 


3 


GSD FL 


3 


GSD FL 


3 


GSE 201 


3 










USAF 


1 


USAF 


1 


USAF 





Zool 102 


5 


Zool 103 


5 


Phsl 209 


5 




18 




18 




17 



HISTORY 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION OR LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



FALL HOURS 
GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 101 3 

GSD FL 3 

GSE PE r 

FC 

USAF _0 

16 



GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSE 201 3 

USAF 1 

Hist 201 3 



First Year 



WINTER 

GSA-1 


HOURS 
3 


GSB-1 


3 


GSC-1 

GSD 102 


3 

. 3 


GSD FL 

GSE PE 


3 

1 


FC 





USAF 






16 
Second Year 

GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

USAF 1 

Hist 202 3 

Hist elective 3 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSD FL 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _1 

17 



GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 . 

GSC-2 3 

USAF 

Hist 203 3 

Hist elective 3 



16 



16 



15 



HOME ADVISERS (EXTENSION) SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS 

First Year 



FALL HOURS 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 101 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

F&N 105 4 

HEEd 111 _2 

16 



WINTER HOURS 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

C&T 127 4 

H&F227 _3 

17 



SPRING HOURS 
GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

C&T 131 3 

H&F 237 J3 

16 



BACHELOR'S DEGREE CURRICULA, CARBONDALE 



35 



GSA-1 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSD 108 3 

GSE 201 _3 

15 
Missing: GSA-2 (3 hours) and GSB-2 (6 hours) (also USAF) 



Second 


Yea 


r 






GSA-1 




.... 3 


GSA 


3 


GSA-2 




.... 3 


GSA-2 


3 


GSC-2 




.... 3 


GSC-2 


3 


GSD 109 




.... 3 


GSD 110 


3 


F&N 206 




.... 4 
16 


C&T 233 


_3 

15 



HOME AND FAMILY (GENERAL) 

First 



SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS 



FALL HOURS 
GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 101 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

F&N 105 _4 

17 



GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC 201, 202, or 203 .. 3 

GSD 108 3 

C&T 131 3 



Year 



WINTER HOURS 
GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

C&T 127 _4 

17 
Second Year 

GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC 204, 205, or 206 .. 3 

GSD 109 3 

F&N 206 4 



SPRING HOURS 
GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

C&T 135 _3 

16 



GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC 207, 208, 209, 210 3 

GSD 110 3 

H&F 237 3 



15 16 

Missing: GSE 201 (also USAF, which is required of men only), 



15 



HOME AND FAMILY 



FALL HOURS 
GSA 101 3 

GSB 101 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 101 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

F&N 105 _4 

17 

GSA 201 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSD Math or FL 3 

C&T 131 _3 

15 
Missing: GSE 201. 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



First Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSA 102 3 

GSB 102 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

Elective 4 

17 
Second Year 

GSA 202 3 

GSB-2 3 

C SC— 2 3 

GSD Math or FL .......... 3 

F&N 206 _4 

16 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA 103 3 

GSB 103 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

C&T 135 _3 

16 



GSA 203 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSD Math or FL 3 

H&F 237 _3 

15 



36 



SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION (TEACHING) 

First Year 



HOURS 

3 

3 

3 

1 



4 



FALL 

GSB 101 

GSC 101 

GSD 101 

GSE PE 

FC 

F&N 105 

HEEd 111 _2 

16 

GSA 101 3 

GSB 201 3 

GSC 201 3 

GSD 108 or FL 3 

GSE 201 3 

C&T 233 _3 

18 



HOURS 
3 

3 

3 



WINTER 

GSB 102 

GSC 102 

GSD 102 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

C&T 127 4 

H&F 227 _3 

17 
Second Year 

GSA 102 3 

GSB 202 3 

GSC 202 3 

GSD 109 or FL 3 

F&N 206 _4 

16 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



SPRING HOURS 

GSB 103 3 

GSC 103 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

C&T 131 3 

H&F 237 J 

16 

GSA 103 3 

GSB 203 3 

GSC 203 3 

GSD 110 or FL 3 

HEd 310 4 

H&F 324 (or C&T 233) _2 

18 



Missing: GSA-2 sequence (also USAF), 



INSTITUTION MANAGEMENT 



SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS 



FALL HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSB 101 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 101 3 

GSD 108 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

F&N 105 _4 

17 



Acct 251 4 

Chem 110 4 

C&T 251 3 

Phsl 209 5 



First Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSB 102 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSD 109 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

H&F 227 _3 

16 

3 

3 
4 
4 
4 



Second Year 

GSB 211 

GSC-2 

Acct 252 

Chem 240 

F&N 206 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSA 201 3 

GSB 103 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSD 110 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

16 



GSB 212 3 

GSC-2 3 

H&F 237 3 

Chem 350 4 

F&N 335 4 



16 18 

Missing: GSA-2 (6 hours), GSB-2 (3 hours), GSC-2 (3 hours), and GSE 201. 



17 



BACHELOR'S DEGREE CURRICULA, CARBONDALE 



37 



INTER-AMERICAN STUDIES 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



FALL HOURS 
GSA 101 3 

GSB 101 3 

GSC 110 3 

GSD 101 3 

GSD HO 1 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _0 

16 

GSA 201 3 

GSB 211 3 

GSC 201 or 202 3 

GSE 201 3 

USAF 1 

Span 201 3 



First Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSA 102 3 

GSB 102 3 

GSC 111 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSD 141 1 3 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA 103 3 

GSB 103 3 

GSC 112 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSD 142 1 3 



FC 

USAF 





_0 

15 
Second Year 

GSA 202 3 

GSB 212 3 

GSC 204, 205, or 206 .... 3 

GSE PE 1 

USAF 1 

Span 202 3 

Elective 3 



FC 
USAF 



. 
.J 

16 



GSA 203 3 

GSB 213 3 

GSC 208 3 

GSE PE 1 

USAF 

Span 203 3 

Elective __3 

16 17 16 

1 One who has taken Spanish in high school should begin as a freshman with Span 201, 
202, 203, and 6 hours of 220 rather than GSD 140, 141, 142. 



INTERIOR DESIGN 



FALL HOURS 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 101 3 

GSD 108 1 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

IEd 112 3 

HEEd 111 (2j0 

16 

GSA-1 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

C&T 390 5 

H&F 227 3 



SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS 



First Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSD 109 or FL 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

C&T 131 3 



16 
Second Year 

GSA-1 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

C&T 380 4 

IEd 216 4 



SPRING HOURS 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSD 110 or FL 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

C&T 135 or 251 3 

16 

GSA-1 3 

GSB-2 3 

C&T 231 3 

C&T 381 4 

H&F 237 _3 

17 17 16 

Missing: GSA-2 sequence, GSC-2 (3 hours), and GSE 201 (also USAF, which is re- 
quired of men only). 



1 GSD 108 is required for the major. One may complete a sequence in GSD-Math or 
take a full sequence of GSD-FL in addition to 108. 

2 HEEd is recommended for one who is in doubt concerning his major within home 
economics. 



38 



SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



JOURNALISM 

FALL 

GSA 101 


HOURS 
3 


GSB 101 

GSC 110 


3 

.... 3 


GSD 101 


.... 3 


GSE PE 

FC 


1 

.. 


USAF 


.. 


Jrnl 101 


. 3 


GSA 201 


16 

3 


GSB 211 


3 


GSC-2 


. .. 3 


GSD Math or FL 
USAF 


3 

1 


Jrnl 201 


3 



SCHOOL OF COMMUNICATIONS 



Missing: GSE 201. 



16 



First Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSA 102 3 

GSB 102 3 

GSC 111 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 

Jrnl 102 _3 

16 
Second Year 

GSA 202 3 

GSB 212 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSD Math or FL 3 

USAF 1 

Jrnl 202 _3 

16 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA 103 3 

GSB 103 3 

GSC 112 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 1 

Jrnl 103 _3 

17 



GSA 203 3 

GSB 213 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSD Math or FI 3 

USAF 

Specialization 1 5 

17 



1 One specializing in Advertising should take Mktg 230 during his sixth quarter; one 
specializing in Community Newspaper should take Jrnl 350 plus 2 hours; in Magazine 
Journalism, Jrnl 297 plus 2 hours; in News and Editorial, Jrnl 203 plus 2 hours. 



JOURNALISM 



FALL HOURS 
GSA 101 3 

GSB 101 3 

GSC 110 3 

GSD 101 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 

Jrnl 101 _3 

16 

GSA 201 3 

GSB-2 3 

C SC— 2 3 

GSD Math or FL .'.....'.' 3 

USAF 1 

Jrnl 201 _3 

16 
Missing: GSE 201. 



First Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSA 102 3 

GSB 102 3 

GSC 111 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 

Jrnl 102 _3 

16 
Second Year 

GSA 202 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSD Math or FL ZZ'Z 3 

USAF 1 

Jrnl 202 _^ 

16 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA 103 3 

GSB 103 3 

GSC 112 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 1 

Jrnl 103 _3 

17 

GSA 203 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSD Math or FL "ZZZ. 3 

USAF 

Jrnl 203 3 

15 



BACHELOR'S DEGREE CURRICULA, CARBONDALE 



39 



MANAGEMENT 

FALL 

GSA-1 


HOURS 
3 


GSB-1 (waive) .... 

GSB 201 * 

GSC-1 




3 

3 


GSD 101 


3 


GSD Math 

GSE PE .. 


3 

1 


FC 





USAF 



First Y 



ear 



16 

GSA-2 3 

GSB 211 x 3 

GSC-2 3 

USAF 1 

Acct 251 4 

Mktg 225 3 



WINTER HOURS 
GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 (waive) 

GSB 202 1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSD Math 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _0 

16 
Second Year 

GSA-2 3 

GSB 212 1 3 

GSC-2 3 

USAF 1 

Acct 252 4 

Econ214 3 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 (waive) 

GSB 203 1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSD Math 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF J. 

17 

GSA-2 3 

GSE 201 3 

GSC-2 3 

USAF 

Acct 253 4 

Econ215 3 



17 17 

1 The five GSB-2 courses are required for the major; GSB-1 is waived. 



16 



MARKETING 












First Ye 


a r 


FALL 


HOURS 


WINTER 


HOURS 


GSA 101 


3 


GSA 102 


3 


GSB-1 (waive) . 





GSB-1 (waive) .... 





GSB 201 1 


3 


GSB 202 * 


3 


GSC 100, or 101 


& 


GSC 102 & 102A 


3 


101A 


3 






GSD 101 


3 


GSD 102 


3 


GSD 108 


3 


GSD 109 


3 


GSE PE 


1 


GSE PE 


1 


FC 





FC 





USAF 





USAF 






16 

GSA 201 3 

GSB 211 * 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSE 201 3 

USAF 1 

Acct 251 4 



Second 

GSA 202 

GSB 212 1 

GSC-2 



Yea 



16 

. 3 
. 3 
. 3 



USAF 1 

Acct 252 4 

Econ 214 3 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 

SPRING HOURS 

GSA 103 3 

GSB-1 (waive) 

GSB 203 1 3 

GSC 103 & 103A 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSD HOB 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF ._1 

17 

GSA 203 3 

GSC-2 3 

USAF 

Acct 253 4 

Econ 215 3 

Mktg 225 3 



17 17 

1 The five GSB-2 courses are required for the major; GSB-1 is waived. 



16 



40 



SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



MATHEMATICS 



FALL HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 101 3 

GSD 114 3 

GSE PE 1 

GSE 201 3 

FC 

USAF _0 

16 

GSA-2 3 

GSB 211 3 

GSB 202 3 

GSC-2 3 

USAF 1 

Math 251 _5 

18 



First Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSD 115 and 116 6 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _0 

16 
Second Year 

GSA-2 3 

GSB 212 3 

GSB 331 3 

GSC-2 3 

USAF 1 

Math 252 _5 

18 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 103 3 

Math 150 5 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF J 

16 

GSA-2 3 

GSB 213 3 

Guid 305 4 

GSC-2 3 

USAF 

Math 253 _4 

17 



MATHEMATICS 



FALL HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 101 3 

GSD 114 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 

Elective 3 

16 

GSA-2 3 

GSB 211 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSE 201 3 

USAF 1 

Math 251 _5 

18 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 
First Year 



WINTER HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSD 115 and 116 6 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 

vs 

Second Year 

GSA-2 3 

GSB 212 3 

GSC-2 3 

USAF 1 

Math 252 _5 

15 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 103 3 

Math 150 5 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 1 



16 

GSA-2 3 

GSB 213 3 

GSC-2 3 

Phil or GSB 202 3 

USAF 

Math 253 _4 

16 



BACHELOR'S DEGREE CURRICULA, CARBONDALE 



41 



MICROBIOLOGY 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



First Year 



FALL 


HOURS 


WINTER 


HOURS 


GSA-1 (waive) .. 





GSA-1 (waive) 





GSB-1 


3 


GSB-1 


3 


GSD 101 


3 


GSD 102 


3 


GSD 114 


3 


GSD 115 


3 


GSE PE 


1 


GSE PE 


1 


FC 





FC 





USAF 





USAF 





Chem 111 


5 


Chem 112 


5 




15 




15 






Second 


Year 


GSA 201 


3 


GSA 202 


3 


GSB-2 


3 


GSB-2 


3 


GSC-1 


3 


GSC-1 


3 


GSE 201 


3 


Elective 


3-5 


USAF 


1 


USAF 


1 


Chem 305 


4 


Chem 306 


4 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSB-1 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSD 116 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 1 

Chem 113 _5 

16 



GSA 203 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-1 3 

Elective 3-5 

USAF 

Chem 235 5 



17 



17-19 



17-19 



Missing: GSC-2 sequence. 

MUSIC EDUCATION (ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY) 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



FALL HOURS 
GSA 101 3 

GSB 101 3 

GSC-1 (waive) 

GSD 101 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 

Mus 105 (theory) 4 

Mus (applied) 2 

Mus (ensemble) 1 

Mus (class piano) 1 

18 



GSA 201 3 

GSB 201 3 

GSD Math or FL 3 

GSE 201 3 

USAF 1 

Mus 205 (theory) 3 

Mus (applied) 2 

Mus (ensemble) 1 

Mus (class piano) 1 

Mus (class instrument) 1 

21 



First Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSA 102 3 

GSB 102 3 

GSC-1 (waive) 

GSD 102 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 

Mus 106 (theory) 4 

Mus (applied) 2 

Mus (ensemble) 1 

Mus (class piano) 1 

18 
Second Year 

GSA 202 3 

GSB 202 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSD Math or FL 3 

USAF 1 

Mus 206 (theory) 3 

Mus (applied) 2 

Mus (ensemble) 1 

Mus (class piano) 1 

Mus (class instrument) 1 

21 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA 103 3 

GSB 103 3 

GSC-1 (waive) 

GSD 103 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 1 

Mus 107 (theory) 4 

Mus (applied) 2 

Mus (ensemble) 1 

Mus (class piano) 1 

19 



GSA 203 3 

GSB 203 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSD Math or FL ..'....'.' 3 

USAF 

Mus 207 (theory) 3 

Mus (applied) 2 

Mus (ensemble) 1 

Mus (class piano) 1 

Mus (class instrument) 1 

20 



42 



SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



MUSIC 



FALL HOURS 

GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 (waive) 

GSD 101 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 

Mus 105 (theory) 4 

Mus (applied) 2 

Mus (ensemble) 1 

Mus (class piano) 1 

18 

GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSD FL 3 

USAF 1 

Mus 205 (theory) 3 

Mus (applied) 2 

Mus (ensemble) 1 

Mus (class piano) _1 

20 
Missing: GSE 201. 



First Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 (waive) 

GSD 102 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 

Mus 106 (theory) 4 

Mus (applied) 2 

Mus (ensemble) 1 

Mus (class piano) 1 

18 
Second Year 

GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSD FL 3 

USAF 1 

Mus 206 (theory) 3 

Mus (applied) 2 

Mus (ensemble) 1 

Mus (class piano) 1 

20 



SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS 



SPRING HOURS 
GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 (waive) 

GSD 103 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 1 

Mus 107 (theory) 4 

Mus (applied) 2 

Mus (ensemble) 1 

Mus (class piano) 1 

19 

GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSD FL 3 

USAF 

Mus 207 (theory) 3 

Mus (applied) 2 

Mus (ensemble) 1 

Mus (class piano) 1 

19 



MUSIC 



FALL HOURS 
GSA 101 3 

GSB 101 3 

GSC-1 (waive) 

GSD 101 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 

Mus 105 (theory) 4 

Mus (applied major) .... 2 
Mus (class piano or 

ensemble) 1 

17 

GSA 201 3 

GSB 201 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSD 123 3 

USAF 1 

Mus 205 (theory) 3 

Mus (private applied) .. 2 
Mus (ensemble or 

class piano) 1 

19 
Missing: GSE 201. 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



First Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSA 102 3 

GSB 102 3 

GSC-1 (waive) 

GSD 102 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 

Mus 106 (theory) 4 

Mus (applied major) .... 2 
Mus (class piano or 
ensemble) 1 

17 
Second Year 

GSA 202 3 

GSB 202 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSD 124 3 

USAF 1 

Mus 206 (theory) 3 

Mus (private applied) .. 2 
Mus (ensemble or 

class piano) 1 

19 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA 103 3 

GSB 103 3 

GSC-1 (waive) 

GSD 103 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 1 

Mus 107 (theory) 4 

Mus (applied major) .... 2 
Mus (class piano or 
ensemble) _1 

18 



GSA 203 3 

GSB 203 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSD 125 3 

USAF 

Mus 207 (theory) 3 

Mus (private applied) .. 2 
Mus (ensemble or 

class piano) ._!_ 

18 



BACHELOR'S DEGREE CURRICULA, CARBONDALE 



43 



NURSING 










DEPARTMENT OF 


NURSING 








First 


Year 








FALL 


HOURS 


WINTER 


HOURS 


SPRING 


HOURS 


SUMMER 


HOURS 


GSA-1 (waive) .. 


GSA-1 (waive) .. 


GSA-1 (waive) .. 


GSA-2 ... 


3 


GSB-1 


3 


GSB-1 


3 


GSB-1 


3 


GSB-2 


3 


GSC-1 


3 


GSC-1 


3 


GSC-1 


3 


GSC-2 


3 


GSD 101 .. 


3 


GSD 102 


3 










GSD Math 


or FL 3 


GSD Math 


or FL 3 


GSD Math 


i or FL 3 


GSE PE 


1 


FC 





FC 





FC 









Chem 110 . 


4 


Chem 240 


4 


F&N 103 . 


4 






Nurs 101 ... 


1 


Nurs 102 . 


1 


Nurs 105 . 


1 














Phsl 300 . 


4 


Phsl 209 


5 




17 




17 
Second 


Year 


18 




15 


GSA-2 


3 


GSA-2 


3 










GSB-2 


3 


GSB-2 


3 










GSC-2 


3 


GSC-2 


3 










GSD 103 


3 














GSE PE .... 


1 


GSE PE 


1 










Nurs 215 .. 


3 


Micro 100 


5 











16 15 

Missing: GSE 201 (also USAF, which is required only of men). 



NURSING (FOR REGISTERED NURSES) 

First 

FALL HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) .. 

GSA-2 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD-1 3 

GSD Math or FL 3 
GSE PE J. 

16 

GSA-3 3-4 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

Nurs 305 4 

Nurs 309 4 



DEPARTMENT OF NURSING 



WINTER 


HOURS 


GSA-1 (waive) .. 


GSA-2 


3 


GSB-1 


3 


GSC-1 


3 


GSD-1 


3 


GSD Math 


or FL 3 


GSE PE 


1 




16 




Second 


GSB-2 


3 


GSC-2 


3 


Nurs 311 .. 


4 


Nurs 312 .. 


4 


Elective 


4 



Year 

SPRING HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) . 

GSA-2 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD-1 3 

GSD Math or FL 3 
GSE PE J_ 

16 



SUMMER HOURS 

GSA-3 3-4 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

Elective 4 

GSE 201 3 

16-17 



17-18 18 

Missing: USAF, which is required only of men. 



44 



SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



PHILOSOPHY 



FALL HOURS 
GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC 100 or 101 3 

GSD 101 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 

Elective _3 

16 

GSA 201 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSD 108 or FL 3 

GSE 201 3 

USAF 1 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 

First Year 



16 



WINTER HOURS 

GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC 102 3 

GSD 102 3 

FC 

USAF 

Elective _3 

15 
Second Year 

GSA 202 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSD 109 or FL 3 

GSE PE 1 

USAF 1 

Elective 3 

17 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC 103 3 

GSD 103 3 



FC 

USAF . 
Elective 



GSA 203 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC 207 or 208 3 

GSD 110 or FL 3 

GSE PE 1 

USAF 

Elective 3 

16 



PHOTOGRAPHY 



t Ye 



FALL 


HOURS 


WINTER 


HOURS 


GSA-1 


3 


GSA-1 


3 


GSB-1 


3 


GSB-1 


3 


GSC-1 


3 


GSC-1 


3 


GSD 100 or 101 


3 


GSD 102 


3 


GSE PE 


1 


GSE PE 


1 


FC 





FC 





USAF 





USAF 





Art 100 


5 


P&P 260A 


3 




18 




16 






Second Y 


ear 


GSA-2 


3 


GSA-2 


3 


GSB-2 


3 


GSB-2 


3 


GSC-2 


3 


GSC-2 


3 


GSD Math or FL 


3 


GSD Math or FL 


3 


USAF 


1 


USAF 


1 


P&P 365A 


4 


P&P 261A 


3 




17 




16 


Missing: GSE 201. 









SCHOOL OF COMMUNICATIONS 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 1 

P&P 360A _3 

17 



GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSD Math or FL 3 

USAF 

P&P 308A _4 

16 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION (MEN) 



FALL HOURS 
GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 101 3 

GSD Math 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 

PEM 1 J. 

17 



First 



ear 



WINTER HOURS 

GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSD Math 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 

PEM 1 J 

17 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



SPRING HOURS 
GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSD Math 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 1 

PEM 1 _l 

18 



BACHELOR'S DEGREE CURRICULA, CARBONDALE 



45 



GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSA 301 4 

USAF 1 

PEM 2 2 



Second 
GSA-2 


Year 

3 


GSB-2 


3 


GSC-2 


3 


Phsl 300 


4 


USAF 


1 


PEM 2 


3 



GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSE 201 3 

USAF 

PEM 303 5 



16 17 

1 115, 117, 181, 182, or 183 each quarter of the first year. 
2 101-2, 114-1, 116-1, and 217-1 during the fall and winter of the second year. 



17 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION (WOMEN) 

First 



Year 



FALL 


HOURS 


WINTER 


HOURS 


GSA-1 


3 


GSA-1 


3 


GSB-1 


3 


GSB-1 


3 


GSC-1 


3 


GSC-1 


3 


GSD 101 


3 


GSD 102 


3 


GSD 108 


3 


GSD 109 


3 


PEW 114 1 


1 


PEW 113 1 


1 


FC 





FC 







16 




16 






Second 


Year 


GSA-2 


3 


GSA-2 


3 


GSB-2 


3 


GSB-2 


3 


GSC-2 


3 


GSC-2 


3 


GSB 331 


3 


Elective toward 


minor .. 4 


GSE 201 


3 






PEW 112 


1 


PEW 122 


.. 1 


PEW 244 


1 


PEW 224 


1 






PEW 374 


1 



17 16 

X PEW 114, 113, and 120 satisfy the GSE-1 requirement. 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSD 110 3 

PEW 120 1 1 

FC _0 

16 

GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

PEW 142 1 

PEW 228 1 

PEW 350 J5 

16 



PHYSICS 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION OR LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 

First Year 



FALL 


HOURS 


WINTER 




HOURS 


SPRING 


HOURS 


GSA-1 (waive) 





GSA-1 (waive) 





GSA-1 (waive) 





GSB 101 


3 


GSB 102 




3 


GSB 103 

GSC-1 


3 

3 


GSD 101 


3 


GSD 102 ., 




3 


GSD 103 


3 


GSD 114 1 


3 


GSD 115 1 


and 


116 6 


Math 150 


5 


GSE PE 


1 


GSE PE . 




1 


GSE PE 


1 


FC 





FC 







FC 





USAF 





USAF 







USAF 


1 


Chem 111 


_5 

15 


Chem 112 




5 

18 




16 






Second 


Year 






GSA-2 


3 


GSA-2 




3 


GSA-2 


3 


GSC-1 


3 


GSC-1 




3 


GSB 201 

GSE 201 


3 

3 


USAF 


1 


USAF 




1 


USAF 





Math 251 


5 


Math 252 




5 


Math 253 


4 


Phys 211 


_5 

17 


Phys 213 




5 

17 


Phys 212 


_5 

18 



Missing: GSB 202, 203, and GSC-2 sequence. 

1 If a student receives advanced standing in GSD 114, he should take 115 fall quarter. 



46 



SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



PHYSIOLOGY (PROFESSIONAL) COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 

This curriculum is only for those who wish to become professional physiologists. It will 
be varied individually for premedical technologists and similar preprofessional students 
who wish to major in physiology. 

First Year 



FALL HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 

3 

3 

3 



GSA 201 

GSD 101 . 

GSD Math 

GSD FL 3 



GSE PE 

FC 

USAF 



1 





Chem 111 J! 

18 



GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

USAF 1 

Chem 305 4 

Zool 102 _5 

16 



WINTER HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSA 202 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSD Math 3 

GSD FL 3 

GSEPE 1 

FC 

USAF 

Chem 112 _5 

18 
Second Year 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

USAF 1 

Chem 306 4 

Zool 202 _5 

16 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSA 203 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSD Math 3 

GSD FL 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 1 

Chem 113 _5 

19 



GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

USAF 

Chem 235 5 

Zool 300 5 



16 



Missing: GSB-2, GSC-2 sequences, and GSE 201, 



PLANT INDUSTRIES 



SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE 



First Year 



FALL 

GSA-1 3 




HOURS 
3 


GSB 101 




3 


GSD 101 




.... 3 


GSD 108 or 
GSE PE 


114 . 


3 

1 


FC 







USAF 







Agriculture 1 
GSA 201 




3-4 

16-17 

.. 3 


GSB 211 




.. 3 


GSC 100 or 
GSC-2 


101 . 


3 

. 3 


USAF 




1 


Agriculture 2 




3-5 



WINTER HOURS 

GSA-1 3 3 

GSB 102 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSD 109 or 115 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 

Agriculture 1 2-4 

15-17 
Second Year 

GSA 202 3 

GSB 212 3 

GSC 102 3 

GSC-2 3 

USAF 1 

Agriculture 2 4-5 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA-1 3 3 

GSB 103 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSD 110 or 116 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 1 

Agriculture 1 3-4 

17-18 



GSA 203 3 

GSB 213 3 

GSC 103 3 

GSC-2 3 

USAF 

Agriculture 2 3-5 



16-18 17-18 15-17 

Missing: GSE 201. 

1 At least one course should be selected from a different department each quarter from 
those listed immediately below under the corresponding quarter. 

Agl 114, 145 4 Agl 114, 145, 210 214 2-4 Agl 145, 215 4 

AnI 105, 231 4 AnI 125, 231 4 AnI 105, 125 4 

For 104, 222 3 For 3 For 221 3 

P1I 103, 264 4 P1I 103 4 P1I 103, 264 4 

2 One course should be selected each quarter from those listed below, or above, under 
the corresponding quarter. 

P1I 304-3, 306 3-5 P1I 301 F-4, 309-5, P1I 302-4, 304-3, 

324-4, 344 4-5 309-5 3-5 

3 Students with excellent science backgrounds may waive GSA 101, 102, 103 and substi- 
tute Chemistry 111, 112, and 113 or 305. Such students may be interested in following 
the Agricultural Science option as noted in the School of Agriculture bulletin. 



BACHELOR'S DEGREE CURRICULA, CARBONDALE 



47 



PRINTING MANAGEMENT 



FALL HOURS 

GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 101 3 

GSD Math 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 



16 

GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSD 103 3 

USAF 1 

P&P 265B J3 

16 



SCHOOL OF COMMUNICATIONS 



First Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSD Math 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 



16 
Second Year 

GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSE 201 3 

USAF 1 

P&P 271B ._4 

17 



SPRING HOURS 
GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD Math 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 1 

P&P 217B _4 

18 

GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSB 211 3 

USAF 

P&P 272B & 302B _6 

18 



PSYCHOLOGY 



FALL HOURS 
GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 101 3 

GSD Math or FL 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _0 

16 

GSA-2 3 

GSB 202 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSD Math or FI 3 

GSE 201 3 

USAF _1_ 

16 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



First Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSD Math or FL 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _0 

16 
Second Year 

GSA-2 3 

GSB 201 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSD Math or FL ....'.'....'.' 3 

Psyc 211 4 

USAF _1 

17 



SPRING HOURS 
GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSD Math or FL 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _l 

17 



GSA-2 3 

GSB 203 3 

CSC— 2 3 

GSD Math or FL ... ......' 3 

Psyc 212 4 

USAF _0 

16 



48 



SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



RADIO-TELEVISION 



SCHOOL OF COMMUNICATIONS 



st Year 



FALL 




HOURS 


WINTER 




HOURS 


SPRING 


HOURS 


GSA-1 




3 


GSA-1 




3 


GSA-1 


3 


GSB-1 




3 


GSB-1 




3 


GSB-1 


3 


GSC-1 




3 


GSC-1 




3 


GSC-1 


3 


GSD 101 




3 


GSD 102 




3 


GSD 103 


3 


GSD Math or 


FL 


3 


GSD Math or 


FL 


3 


GSD Math or FL .. 


3 


GSE PE 




1 


GSE PE 




1 


GSE PE 


1 


FC 







FC 







FC 





USAF 






16 


USAF 

Second 


Y 


_0 

16 
ear 


USAF 


_J_ 

17 


GSA-2 




3 


GSA-2 




3 


GSA-2 


3 


GSB-2 




3 


GSB-2 




3 


GSB-2 


3 


GSC-2 




3 


GSC-2 




3 


GSC-2 


3 


GSE 201 




3 








Pass typing test 




USAF 




1 


USAF 




1 


USAF 





R-T 161, 367, 


257, 




R-T 161, 251, 


373, 




R-T 161, 251, 257, 




or 351 




4 


367, or elect 


ives 


6 


351, 367, 373, 393 


i 














or electives 


8 






17 






16 




17 


RECREATION 










COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 








First 


Ye 


a r 






FALL 




HOURS 


WINTER 




HOURS 


SPRING 


HOURS 


GSA-1 




3 


GSA-1 




3 


GSA-1 


3 


GSB-1 




3 


GSB-1 




3 


GSB-1 


3 


GSC-1 




3 


GSC-1 




3 


GSC-1 


3 


GSD 101 




3 


GSD 102 




3 






GSD Math or 


FL . 


3 


GSD Math or 


FL 


3 


GSD Math or FL 


3 


GSE PE 




1 


GSE PE 




1 


GSE PE 


1 


FC 







FC 







FC 





USAF 






16 


USAF 

Second 


y 




16 

ear 


USAF 

Rec 100 


1 

_3 

17 


GSA-2 




3 


GSA-2 




3 


GSA-2 


3 


GSB-2 




3 


GSB-2 




3 


GSB-2 


3 


GSC-2 




3 


GSC-2 




3 


GSC-2 


3 


GSE 201 




3 








GSD 103 


3 


USAF 




1 


USAF 




1 


USAF 











Acct 250 




4 


Mgt 170 


4 


Rec 201 




_4 

17 


Rec 202 




..._4 

18 




16 



SECRETARIAL STUDIES AND OFFICE MANAGEMENT SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 



FALL HOURS 
GSA 101 3 

GSB 101 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 101 3 

GSD 108 or 114 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _0 

16 



First Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSA 102 3 

GSB 102 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSD 109 or 115 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _0 

16 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA 103 3 

GSB 103 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSD HOB 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF J_ 

17 



BACHELOR'S DEGREE CURRICULA, CARBONDALE 



49 



GSA 201 3 

GSB 211 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSE 201 3 

USAF 1 

Sec 201 J3 

16 



Second Year 

GSA 202 3 

GSB 212 3 

GSC-2 3 

USAF 1 

Econ214 3 

Sec 202 _3 

16 



GSA 203 or 200 3 

GSB 213 3 

GSC-2 3 

USAF 

Econ 215 3 

Sec 203 _3 

15 



SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 



FALL HOURS 
GSA 101 3 

GSB 101 3 

GSC 100 or 101 3 

GSD 101 3 

GSD 108 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _0 

16 



GSA 201 3 

GSB 211 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSE 201 3 

USAF 1 

Acct 251 4 



First Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSA 102 3 

GSB 102 3 

GSC 102 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSD 109 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _0 

16 
Second Year 

GSA 202 3 

GSB 212 3 

GSC-2 3 

USAF 1 

Acct 252 4 

Econ 214 3 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA 103 3 

GSB 103 3 

GSC 103 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSD HOB 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _1 

17 

GSA 203 3 

GSB 213 3 

GSC-2 3 

USAF 

Acct 253 4 

Econ 215 3 



17 17 16 

Some fields of interest require course sequences (outside the School of Business) that 
should begin in the second year. The Small Business Institute will work with General 
Studies advisers in these cases. 



SOCIAL STUDIES 



FALL HOURS 
GSA 101 3 

GSB 101 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 101 3 

GSD Math 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _0 

16 

GSA 201 3 

GSB 201 3 

GSB 211 3 

GSC-2 3 

USAF 1 

Hist 201 _3 

16 



First Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSA 102 3 

GSB 102 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSD Math 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _0 

16 
Second Year 

GSA 202 3 

GSB 202 3 

GSB 212 3 

GSC-2 3 

USAF 1 

Econ 214 3 

Hist 202 _3 

19 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA 103 3 

GSB 103 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSD 110 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF ._l 

17 

GSA 203 3 

GSB 203 3 

GSE 201 3 

GSC-2 3 

USAF 

Econ 215 3 

Hist 203 _3 

18 



50 



SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



SOCIOLOGY 



FALL HOURS 
GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 101 3 

GSD Math 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _0 

16 

GSA-2 3 

GSB 203 ' 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSD FL 3 

GSE 201 3 

USAF 1 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 

First Year 



WINTER HOURS 

GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSD Math 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _0 

16 
Second Year 

GSA-2 3 

GSB 201 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSD FL ; 3 

Elective 4 

USAF 1 



SPRING HOURS 
GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSD Math 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF J. 

17 

GSA-2 3 

GSB 202 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSD FL 3 

Soc 101 a 5 

USAF 



16 17 17 

Students will follow the curriculum as outlined and will consult with appropriate ad- 
visers before attempting any changes. For special interests, problems, and program plan- 
ning, consult the Department of Sociology. 

1 GSB 203 is offered all three quarters, but students majoring in sociology must complete 
GSB 203 before taking Soc 101, which is available only in the spring. Soc 101 and GSB 
203 must not be taken concurrently. 



SPEECH (TEACHING) 



FALL HOURS 

GSA 101 3 

GSB 101 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 101 3 

GSD Math or FL 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _0 

16 

GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSE 201 3 

USAF 1 

Spch 102 4 



17 



SCHOOL OF COMMUNICATIONS 



First Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSA 102 3 

GSB 102 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSD Math or FL 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _0 

16 
Second Year 

GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

USAF 1 

Spch 103 4 

Spch 202 3 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA 103 3 

GSB 103 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSD Math or FL 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF J_ 

17 



GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

USAF 

Spch 200 4 

Spch 209 1 

Thea 111, 112, or 113 .. 3 



17 



17 



BACHELOR'S DEGREE CURRICULA, CARBONDALE 



51 



SPEECH 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION OR LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 

First Year 



FALL HOURS 

GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 101 3 

GSD 108 or FL 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _0 

16 



WINTER HOURS 

GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSD 109 or FL 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _0 

16 
Second Year 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSD 110 or FL 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _1 

17 



GSA-2 


3 


GSA-2 


3 


GSA-2 


3 


GSB-2 


3 


GSB-2 


3 


GSB-2 


3 


GSC-2 


3 


GSC-2 


3 


GSC-2 


3 


GSE 201 


3 










USAF 


1 


USAF 


1 


USAF 





Spch 102 


4 


Spch 103 and 202 .... 


7 


Spch 


8 




17 




17 




17 



SPEECH CORRECTION 



FALL HOURS 
GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 101 3 

GSD Math or FL 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _0 

16 

GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSB 331 * 3 

USAF 1 

Eng 391 1 3 



SCHOOL OF COMMUNICATIONS 



First Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSD Math or FL 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _0 

16 
Second Year 

GSA-2 3 

GSB 202 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSE 201 3 

USAF 1 

Elective 4 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSD Math or FL 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF J. 

17 



GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

USAF 

Psyc 301 4 

SpCr200 4 



16 17 17 

1 GSB 331 and English 391 are required of those who plan to teach. Others take Guid- 
ance 422, Psychology 301, or 305. 



52 



SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



SPEECH CORRECTION (ELEMENTARY EDUCATION) 









First 


Year 


FALL 




HOURS 


WINTER 


HOURS 


GSA-1 




3 


GSA-1 


3 


GSB-1 




3 


GSB-1 


3 


GSC-1 




3 


GSC-1 


3 


GSD 101 




3 


GSD 102 


3 


GSD Math or 


FL 


3 


GSD Math or 


FL 3 


GSE PE 




1 


GSE PE 


1 


FC 







FC 





USAF 






16 


USAF 

Second 


_0 

16 
Year 


GSA-2 




.. 3 


GSA-2 


3 


GSB-2 




3 


GSB 202 * 


3 


GSC-2 




3 


GSC-2 


3 


GSB 331 




3 


GSE 201 


3 


USAF 




1 


USAF 


1 


Eng 391 




3 


Elective 


4 



16 
1 GSB 202 is prerequisite to Psychology 301. 



17 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



SPRING HOURS 
GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSD Math or FL 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF J. 

17 

GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

Psyc 301 a 4 

USAF 

SpCr200 _4 

17 



THEATER 



FALL HOURS 

GSA 101 3 

GSB 101 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 101 3 

GSD Math or FL 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _0 

16 

GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 (203) 3 

GSE 201 3 

USAF 1 

Thea 111 3 



SCHOOL OF COMMUNICATIONS 

First Year 



16 



WINTER HOURS 

GSA 102 3 

GSB 102 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSD Math or FL 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _0 

16 
Second Year 

GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC 201 3 

USAF 1 

Thea 112 3 

Thea 204 _4 

17 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA 103 3 

GSB 103 3 

GSC-1 3 

Thea 106 4 

GSD Math or FL 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF J_ 

18 



GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC 202 3 

GSD 103 3 

USAF 



Thea 207 



_4 

16 



THEATER 



FALL HOURS 
GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 101 3 

GSD Math or FL 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _0 

16 



First Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSD Math or FI 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _0 

16 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



SPRING HOURS 
GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

Thea 106 4 

GSD Math or FL 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _2 

18 



BACHELOR'S DEGREE CURRICULA, CARBONDALE 



53 



GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC 203 3 

GSE 201 3 

USAF 1 

Thea 111 3 

16 



Second Year 

GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC 201 3 

USAF 1 

Thea 112 3 

Thea 204 _4 

17 



GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC 202 3 

GSD 103 3 

USAF 

Thea 208 1 

Spch 205 _3 

16 



THEATER 



FALL HOURS 
GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 101 3 

GSD Math or FL 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _0 

16 

GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSE 201 3 

USAF 1 

Thea 111 3 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



16 



First Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSD Math or FL 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _0 

16 
Second Year 

GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

USAF 1 

Thea 208 1 

Thea 204 J 

15 



SPRING HOURS 
GSA-1 3 

GSB-1 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD Math or FL 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _1_ 

14 

GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSD 103 3 

USAF 

Thea 106 4 

16 



ZOOLOGY 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



FALL HOURS 
GSA-1 3 

GSB 101 3 

GSC 100 or 101 3 

GSD 101 3 

GSD 114 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _0 

16 

GSA 201 3 

GSB 201 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSD FL 3 

USAF 1 

Chem 111 _5 

18 
Missing: GSC-2 (3 hours) and GSE 201. 



First Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSA-1 3 

GSB 102 3 

GSC 102 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSD 115 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _0 

16 



Second Year 

GSA 202 3 

GSB 202 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSD FL 3 

USAF 1 

Chem 112 _5 

18 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA-1 3 

GSB 103 3 

GSC 103 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSD 116 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _1 

17 



GSA 203 3 

GSB 203 3 

GSC 201 3 

GSD FL 3 

USAF 

Chem 113 _5 

17 



54 



SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



Carbondale Campus Preprofessional Programs 



PHYSICAL THERAPY (PREPROFESSIONAL) 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 

This is a preprofessional program only. Southern does not offer courses leading to a 
bachelor's degree in physical therapy. Each student should obtain the catalog of the pro- 
fessional school which he plans to attend. 

First Year 



FALL HOURS 

GSA 101 3 

GSB 101 3 

GSD 101 3 

GSD 114 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _0 

13 



GSA 201 3 

GSB 201 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSE 201 3 

USAF 1 

Elective 3 



16 
Missing: GSC-2 sequence. 



WINTER 

GSA 102 


HOURS 
3 


GSB 102 


3 


GSD 102 


3 


GSD 115 


3 


GSE PE 


.. 1 


FC 


.. 


USAF 


.. 


Second 
GSA 202 


13 
Year 

3 


GSB 202 


3 


GSC-1 .. 


3 


USAF 


1 


Elective 


3 


Phsl 300 


4 



17 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA 103 3 

GSB 103 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSD 116 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _1 

14 



GSA 203 3 

GSB 203 3 

GSC-1 3 

USAF 

Psyc 301 4 

Psyc 307 _4 

17 



PREDENTAL (PREPROFESSIONAL) COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 

First Year 



FALL HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSB 101 3 

GSD 101 3 

GSD 114 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 

Chem 111 ._5 

15 



GSA 201 3 



WINTER HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSB 102 3 

GSD 102 3 



GSD 115 3 



GSE PE 
FC 



GSB-2 


3 


GSC-1 


. 3 


GSD FL 


3 


USAF 


. 1 


Chem 305 


4 



17 



1 



USAF 

Chem 112 _5 

15 
Second Year 

GSA 202 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD FL 3 

USAF 1 

Chem 306 _4 

17 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSB 103 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSD 116 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 1 

Chem 113 ._5 

16 



GSA 203 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD FL 3 

USAF 

Chem 235 _5 

17 



Missing: GSC-2 sequence and GSE 201. 



PREPROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS, CARBONDALE 



55 



PRE-ENGINEERING (PREPROFESSIONAL) 



SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY 



GSA-1 (waive) 

GSC-1 3, 

GSD 101 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 

Chem 111 5 

Math 150 1 J> 

17 



GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 



USAF 1 

Phys211 5 

Math 253 4 



First Year 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 

Chem 112 5 

Math 251 1 _5 

17 
Second Year 

GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 



USAF 
Phys 213 



GSA-1 (waive) 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 1 

Chem 113 5 

Math 252 1 _5 

18 



GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSE-2 3 

USAF 

Phys 212 5 



16 15 

Missing: GSB-2 sequence and GSC-2 (3 hours). 
1 One who has not received advanced standing must take GSD 114, 115, 



17 



116. 



PRELAW (PREPROFESSIONAL) COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 

First Year 



FALL HOURS 

GSA 101 3 

GSB 101 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 101 3 

GSD 108 or FL 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _0 

16 



GSA 201 3 

GSB 201 or 211 a 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSD Math or FL .........'. 3 

USAF 1 

Govt 231 or 
Hist 201 * 5or3 



WINTER 

GSA 102 


HOURS 

3 


GSB 102 ... 


3 


GSC-1 


3 


GSD 102 


.. 3 


GSD 109 or FL 

GSE PE 


3 

1 


FC 





USAF . 


Second Y 
GSA 202 


16 
ear 

3 


GSB 202 or 212 1 
GSC-2 


3 

3 


GSD Math or FL 
USAF 


3 

1 


Govt 232 or 
Hist 202 * 


. 5 or 3 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA 103 3 

GSB 103 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSD 110 or FL 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF _1 

17 



GSA 203 3 

GSB 203 or 213 * 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSD Math or FL ..'....'..'.' 3 

GSE 201 3 

USAF 

Hist 201 or 203 ' 3 



16-18 16-18 18 

'One who elects GSB 201, 202, 203 should also elect Govt 231, 232, Hist 201. One who 
elects GSB 211, 212, 213 should also elect Hist 201, 202, 203. 



56 



SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



PREMEDICAL TECHNOLOGY (PREPROFESSIONAL) 

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 

First Year 



FALL HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSB 101 3 

GSD 101 3 

GSD 114 3 

GSE PE 1 

FG 

USAF 

Chem 111 _5 

15 



GSA 201 3 

GSB 201 3 

GSC-1 3 

USAF 1 

Phsl 300 4 

Chem 305 _4 

18 
Missing: GSC-2 sequence. 



WINTER HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSB 102 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSD 115 3 

GSE PE 1 

FG 

USAF 

Chem 112 _5 

15 
Second Year 

GSA 202 3 

GSB 202 3 

GSC-1 3 

USAF 1 

GSE 201 3 

Chem 306 _4 

17 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSB 103 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSD 116 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 1 

Chem 113 _5 

16 



GSA 203 3 

GSB 203 3 

GSC-1 3 

USAF 

Elective (GSA-3) 4 

Chem 235 5 



18 



PREMEDICINE (PREPROFESSIONAL) 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 



FALL HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSB 101 3 

GSD 101 3 

GSD 114 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 

Chem 111 _5 

15 



GSA 201 3 

GSB 201 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD FL 3 

USAF 1 

Chem 305 _4 

17 



Missing: GSC-2 sequence and GSE 201. 



First Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSB 102 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSD 115 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 

Chem 112 _5 

15 
Second Year 

GSA 202 3 

GSB 202 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD FL 3 

USAF 1 

Chem 306 _4 

17 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSB 103 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSD 116 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 1 

Chem 113 _5 

16 



GSA 203 3 

GSB 203 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD FL 3 

USAF 

Chem 235 _5 

17 



PREPROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS, CARBONDALE 



57 



PREPHARMACY (PREPROFESSIONAL) 

COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES 

One-Year Program or First Year of a Two-Year Program 

SPRING HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSB 103 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSD 116 3 

FC 

USAF 1 

Chem 113 _5 

18 

GSA 203 3 

GSC-2 3 

GSA-3 3 

USAF 

Chem 235 5 

Phys 207 _5 

19 



FALL 


HOURS 


WINTER 


HOURS 


GSA-1 (waive) . 





GSA-1 (waive) 





GSB 101 


3 


GSB 102 


3 


GSC-1 


3 


GSC-1 


3 


GSD 101 


3 


GSD 102 


3 


GSD 114 


3 


GSD 115 


3 


FC 





FC 





USAF 





USAF 





Chem 111 


5 


Chem 112 


5 




17 




17 






Second 


Year 


GSA 201 


3 


GSA 202 


3 


GSC-2 


3 


GSC-2 


3 






GSE 201 


3 


USAF 


1 


USAF 


1 


Chem 305 


4 


Chem 306 


4 


Phys 206 


5 


Phys 208 


5 



. 16 

Missing: GSB-2 and GSE-1 sequences. 



19 



Pharmacy is a five-year program. It consists of one year of prepharmacy and four years 
in a school of pharmacy or two years of prepharmacy and three years in a school of 
pharmacy. Which program a student should take depends upon the school of phar- 
macy he plans to attend. For instance, the school of pharmacy of the University of 
Illinois accepts only one year of prepharmacy, while St. Louis College of Pharmacy 
accepts two years. Both prepharmacy programs offered at Southern are weak in biologi- 
cal sciences and quantitative analysis. Additional summer work in these areas should be 
taken either at Southern or at the school of pharmacy. 



PREVETERINARY (PREPROFESSIONAL) COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND 

SCIENCES OR THREE-YEAR PROGRAM IN SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE 



FALL HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 



GSB 101 
GSD 101 
GSD 114 



GSE PE 1 



FC .... 
USAF 



Chem 111 _5 

15 

GSA 201 3 

GSB 201 3 

GSC 101 3 

GSD FL 3 

USAF 1 

Chem 305 _4 

17 
Missing: GSC-2 sequence and GSE 201. 



First Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSB 102 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSD 115 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 

Chem 112 _5 

15 



Second Year 

GSA 202 3 

GSB 202 3 

GSC 102 3 

GSD FL 3 

USAF 1 

Chem 306 ,_4 

17 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSB 103 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSD 116 3 

GSE PE 1 



FC 





USAF 


1 


Chem 113 


5 




16 


GSA 203 


3 


GSB 203 


3 


GSC 103 


3 


GSD FL 


3 


USAF 





Chem 235 


5 




17 



58 



SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



PREVETERINARY (PREPROFESSIONAL) , TWO-YEAR PROGRAM, 

SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE 



FALL HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSA 201 3 

GSC 100 or 101 3 

GSD 101 3 

GSD 114 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 

Chem 111 _5 

18 



First Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSA 202 3 

GSC 102 3 

GSD 102 3 

GSD 115 3 

GSE PE 1 

FC 

USAF 

Chem 112 _5 

18 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSA 203 3 

GSC 103 3 

GSD 103 3 

GSD 116 3 

FC 

USAF 1 

Chem 113 _5 

18 



GSB 101 or 201 3 

GSD FL 3 

USAF 1 

Chem 305 4 

Phys 206 _5 

16 
Missing: GSB-1 or -2 sequence, GSC-2 sequence, and GSE 201. 



GSB 102 or 


202 


3 


GSB 103 or 203 


3 


GSD FL 




3 


GSD FL 

GSE PE 


3 

1 


USAF 




1 


USAF 





Chem 306 . 




4 


Chem 235 


5 


Phys 208 ... 




5 

16 


Phys 207 


_5 

17 



Edwardsville Campus 



UNDECIDED 



First Year 



FALL 

GSA 151 
GSB 151 
GSC 153 
GSD 151 

PE 

Elective . 


or 


154'.'."." 


HOURS 
3 

3 

3 

3 

1 

3 

16 


WINTER 

GSA 152 ... 
GSB 152 ... 
GSC 152 ... 
GSD 152 ... 

PE 

Elective 

S e c o n 


d Y 


HOURS 
3 

3 

3 

3 

1 

_3 

16 
ear 


GSA 251 
GSB-2 
GSC 251 






3 

3 

3 


GSA 252 or 

GSB-2 

GSC 252 or 


255 ... 
253'" 


3 

3 

3 


GSD 155 
GSE 251 


or 


FL ... 


3 

._3 

15 


GSD 156 or 
Elective 


FL ... 


3 

3 

15 


ART OR 


ART EDUCATION 




ED 


UCATIO 



EDWARDSVILLE CAMPUS 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA 153 3 

GSB 153 3 

GSC 151 3 

GSD 153 3 

PE 1 

Elective 3 

16 

GSA 253 or 255 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC 252, 253, 254, or 

255 3 

GSD 157 or FL 3 

Elective ...- 3 

15 



FALL HOURS 
GSA 151 3 

GSB 151 3 

GSC-1 (waive) 

GSD 151 or 153 3 

PE 1 

Art 100 _5 

15 



WINTER HOURS 

GSA 152 3 

GSB 152 3 

GSC-1 (waive) 

GSD 152, 153, or 151 .... 3 

PE 1 

Art 100 _5 

15 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA 153 3 

GSB 153 3 

GSC-1 (waive) 

GSD 153 or 152 3 

PE 1 

Art 100 _5 

15 



BACHELOR'S DEGREE CURRICULA, EDWARDSVILLE 



59 



GSA 251 
GSB 251 
GSC 251 
Art 201 . 
Art 203 . 



or 255 



Second Year 

3 GSA 252 3 

3 GSB 252 x or 256 3 

3 GSC 252, 254, or 255 .. 3 

4 Art 201 4 

4 Art 203 4 



GSA 253 3 

GSB 253 x or 257 3 

GSC 253, 254, or 255 .... 3 
Art 324, 310, 300, 305, 
358 (any 2) 8 



17 17 

Missing: GSD Math or FL sequence and GSE 251. 
1 Recommended sequence, inasmuch as Introductory Psychology is included. 



17 



BOTANY (WITH CHEMISTRY) 

EDUCATION OR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY DIVISION 



First Year 



FALL 

GSA-1 (waive) . 

GSA 151 1 

GSA 251 

GSC-1 

GSD 151 


HOURS 



3 

3 

3 

3 


WINTER 

GSA-1 (waive) .. 

GSA 152 1 

GSA 252 

GSC-1 

GSD 152 


HOURS 


3 

3 

3 

3 


Chem 111 


5 


Chem 112 


5 




17 




17 






Second Y 


ear 


GSB-1 

GSC-1 

GSE 251 

Bot 202 

Chem 341 


3 

3 

3 

5 

4 


GSB-2 

GSC-2 

PE 

Elective 

Chem 342 


3 

3 

1 

4 

5 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSA 253 3 

GSD 153 3 

PE 1 

Bot 101 5 

Chem 113 _5 

17 

GSB-3 3 

GSC-2 3 

PE 1 

Bot 225 5 

Chem 343 5 



18 16 

Missing: GSB-1 and GSB-2 and GSD Math-FL sequences and GSC-2 (3 hours), 
1 Required for the concentration. 



17 



BUSINESS 



FALL HOURS 

GSA 151 3 

GSC 153 or 154 3 

GSD 151 3 

GSD Math 3 

PE 1 

Mgt 170 _4 

17 

GSA 251 3 

GSB-1 (waive) 

GSB 257 3 

GSC 251 3 

Acct 251 4 

Econ 1 5 



18 



First Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSA 152 3 

GSB 255 3 

GSC 152 3 

GSD 152 3 

GSD Math 3 

PE I 

16 

Second Year 

GSA 252 3 

GSB-1 (waive) 

GSC 252 3 

Acct 252 4 

Elective 4 

Mgt 271 _4 

18 



BUSINESS DIVISION 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA 153 3 

GSB 256 3 

GSC 151 3 

GSD 153 3 

GSD Math 3 

PE 1 

16 

GSA 255 3 

GSB-1 (waive) 

GSC 253 3 

GSE 251 3 

Acct 253 4 

Mktg230 _5 

18 



1 Course number pending. 



60 



SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



CHEMISTRY (WITH MATHEMATICS) 

EDUCATION OR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY DIVISION 

First Year 



FALL 

GSA-1 (waive) .. 

GSB 151 

GSD 151 

PE 

Chem 111 

Math 150 1 


HOURS 



3 

3 

1 

5 

5 


WINTER 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSB 152 

GSD 152 

PE 

Chem 112 

Math 151 a 


HOURS 



3 

3 

1 

5 

5 


SPRING 

GSA-1 (waive) . 

GSB 153 

GSD 153 

PE 

Chem 113 

Math 252 * 


HOURS 



3 

3 

1 

5 

4 




17 


Second 


17 
Year 




16 


GSC 151 

Chem 336 

Math 253 

Phys 297 


3 

4 

4 

5 


GSB-2 

GSC 152 

Chem 337 

Phys 298 


3 

3 

4 

5 


GSB-2 

GSC 153 

Chem 338 

Phys 299 


3 

3 

4 

5 




16 




15 




15 



Missing: GSA-2 and GSC-2 sequences, GSB-2 (3 hours), and GSE 251. 
1 One who does not receive advanced standing should take GSD Math. 



ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 



FALL HOURS 
GSA 151 3 

GSB 151 3 

GSC-1 (waive) 

GSC 153, 154, or 

GSE 251 3 

GSD 151 3 

GSD Math 3 

PE J^ 

16 

GSA-2 3 

GSB 251 3 

GSC 251 3 

GSE 251 3 

Electives 3-4 

15-16 



First Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSA 152 3 

GSB 152 3 

GSC-1 (waive) 

GSC 153, 154, or 

GSE 251 3 

GSD 152 3 

GSD Math 3 

PE .J_ 

16 
Second Year 

GSA-2 3 

GSB 252 3 

GSC 252 3 

Electives 6-8 

15-17 



EDUCATION DIVISION 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA 153 3 

GSB 153 3 

GSC-1 (waive) 

GSC 153, 154, or 

GSE 251 3 

GSD 153 3 

GSD Math 3 

PE .J, 

16 

GSA-2 3 

GSB 253 3 

GSC 253 3 

Electives 6-8 

15-17 



ENGLISH 



FALL HOURS 
GSA 151 3 

GSB 151 3 

GSC 152 3 

GSD 151 3 

PE 1 

GSD FL 3 

GSD 155 (optional) (3) 
FL conversation 1 

17 



First Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSA 152 3 

GSB 152 3 

GSC 153 or 154 3 

GSD 152 3 

PE 1 

GSD FL 3 

GSD 156 (optional) (3) 
FL conversation 1 

17 



HUMANITIES DIVISION 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA 153 3 

GSB 153 3 

GSC 151 3 

GSD 153 3 

PE 1 

GSD FL 3 

GSD 157 (optional) (3) 
FL conversation _1 

17 



BACHELOR'S DEGREE CURRICULA, EDWARDSVILLE 



61 



GSA 251 3 

GSB 251 or 255 3 

GSC 251 3 

GSE 251 3 

FL 201 and 220 _5 

17 



Second Year 

GSA 252 3 

GSB 252 or 256 3 

GSC 252 3 

Elective 3 

FL 202 and 220 _5 

17 



GSA 253 3 

GSB 253 or 257 3 

GSC 253 3 

Elective 3 

FL 203 and 220 _5 

17 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES (FRENCH, GERMAN, OR SPANISH) 

EDUCATION OR HUMANITIES DIVISION 



FALL HOURS 
GSA 151 3 

GSB 151 3 

GSC 152 3 

GSD 151 3 

GSD FL 3 

GSD 155 (optional) .. (3) 

PE 1 

FL conversation 1 

17 



GSA 251 3 

GSB 251 3 

GSC 251 3 

GSE 251 3 

FL 201 * and 220 5 



First Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSA 152 3 

GSB 152 3 

GSC 153 or 154 3 

GSD 152 3 

GSD FL 3 

GSD 156 (optional) .. (3) 

PE 1 

FL conversation 1 

17 

Second Year 

GSA 252 3 

GSB 252 3 

GSC 252 3 

Elective 3 

FL 202 * and 220 5 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA 153 3 

GSB 153 3 

GSC 151 3 

GSD 153 3 

GSD FL 3 

GSD 157 (optional) .. (3) 

PE 1 

FL conversation .__1 

17 



GSA 253 3 

GSB 253 3 

GSC 253 3 

Elective 3 

FL 203 * and 220 5 



17 17 17 

1 One who has completed FL 201, 202, and 203 (or the equivalent of this second-year 
sequence) should take 311, 312, and 313. 



GEOGRAPHY 



FALL HOURS 
GSA 151 3 

GSB 151 3 

GSC 152 3 

GSD 151 3 

GSD FL 3 

PE _1 

16 

GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

Geog 101 5 

GSE 251 _3 

17 



EDUCATION OR SOCIAL SCIENCES DIVISION 
First Year 



WINTER HOURS 

GSA 152 3 

GSB 152 3 

GSC 153 or 154 3 

GSD 152 3 

GSD FL 3 

PE ._L 

16 
Second Year 

GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

Geog 211 5 

Elective 3-4 

17-18 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA 153 3 

GSB 153 3 

GSC 151 3 

GSD 153 3 

GSD FL 3 

PE J. 

16 



GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

Geog 212 3 

Elective 3-4 



17-18 



62 



SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



GOVERNMENT 



FALL HOURS 
GSA 151 3 

GSB 151 3 

GSC 152 3 

GSD 151 3 

GSD FL 3 

PE .J 

16 

GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

Gov 210 4 

GSE 251 _3" 

16 



EDUCATION OR SOCIAL SCIENCES DIVISION 



First Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSA 152 3 

GSB 152 3 

GSC 153 or 154 3 

GSD 152 3 

GSD FL 3 

PE _1 

16 
Second Year 

GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

Gov 232 4 

Elective 3-4 

16-17 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA 153 3 

GSB 153 3 

GSC 151 3 

GSD 153 3 

GSD FL 3 

PE J. 

16 



GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 

C SC— 2 3 

Gov (300- level) '""""""4-5 
Elective 3-4 



17-18 



HISTORY 



FALL HOURS 
GSA 151 3 

GSB 151 3 

GSC 152 3 

GSD 151 3 

GSD FL 3 

PE J. 

16 

GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

Hist 101 3 

Phil 200 _4 

16 



EDUCATION OR SOCIAL SCIENCES DIVISION 



First Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSA 152 3 

GSB 152 3 

GSC 153 or 154 3 

GSD 152 3 

GSD FL 3 

PE _1 

16 
Second Year 

GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

Hist 201 3 

GSE 251 _3 

15 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA 153 3 

GSB 153 3 

GSC 151 3 

GSD 153 3 

GSD FL 3 

PE J_ 

16 



GSA-2 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-2 3 

Hist 202 3 

Elective 3-4 



15-16 



JOURNALISM (NO CONCENTRATION AVAILABLE) 

First Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSA 152 3 

GSB 152 3 

GSC 153 or 154 3 

GSD 152 3 

GSD FL 3 

GSD 156 (optional) .. (3) 

PE 1 

FL conversation 1 



FALL HOURS 

GSA 151 3 

GSB 151 3 

GSC 152 3 

GSD 151 3 

GSD FL 3 

GSD 155 (optional) .. (3) 

PE 1 

FL conversation 1 

17 



GSA 251 3 

GSB 251 or 255 3 

GSC 251 3 

FL201 and 220 5 

Jrnl 201 _3 

17 
Missing: GSE 251. 



17 
Second Year 

GSA 252 3 

GSB 252 or 256 3 

GSC 252 3 

FL 202 and 221 5 

Jrnl 202 _3 

17 



HUMANITIES DIVISION 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA 153 3 

GSB 153 3 

GSC 151 3 

GSD 153 3 

GSD FL 3 

GSD 157 (optional) .. (3) 

PE 1 

FL conversation 1 

17 

GSA 253 3 

GSB 253 or 257 3 

GSC 253 3 

FL 203 and 222 5 

Jrnl 203 _3 

17 



BACHELOR'S DEGREE CURRICULA, EDWARDSVILLE 



63 



MATHEMATICS (WITH PHYSICS) 

EDUCATION OR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY DIVISION 



FALL HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSB 151 3 

GSD 151 3 

PE 1 

Chem 111 (optional) .... 5 
Math 150 1 _5 

17 



GSA 251 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-1 3 

Math 253 4 

Phys 297 5 



First Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSB 152 3 

GSD 152 3 

PE 1 

Chem 112 (optional) .... 5 
Math 151 a _5 

17 
Second Year 
GSA 252 3 

GSC-1 3 

Math elective and 300 .. 7 
Phys 298 5 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSB 153 3 

GSD 153 3 

PE 1 

Chem 113 (optional) .... 5 
Math 252 1 _4 

16 



GSA 253 3 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-1 3 

Math elective 3 

Phys 299 5 



18 18 

Missing: GSC-2 sequences, GSB-2 (3 hours), and GSE 251. 
1 One who has not received advanced standing should take a GSD Math sequence. 



17 



MUSIC EDUCATION 



FALL HOURS 

GSA 151 3 

GSB 151 3 

GSC-1 (waive) 

GSD 153 3 

Mus 105 4 

Mus (private applied) .. 2 
Mus (class instrument 

or voice) 1-2 

Mus (major ensemble) 1 

17-18 

GSA 251 3 

GSB 251 ' or 255 3 

GSC 255 3 

GSD 155, 173, or 176 .. 3 

Mus 205 3 

Mus (private applied) .. 1 
Mus (class instrument 

or voice) 1 

Mus (major ensemble) 1 



First Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSA 152 3 

GSB 152 3 

GSC-1 (waive) 

GSD 151 3 

Mus 106 4 

Mus (private applied) .. 2 
Mus (class instrument 

or voice) 1-2 

Mus (major ensemble) 1 

17-18 
Second Year 

GSA 252 3 

GSB 252 J or 256 3 

GSC 251 3 

GSD 156, 174, or 177 .. 3 

Mus 206 3 

Mus (private applied) .. 1 
Mus (class instrument 

or voice) 1 

Mus (major ensemble) 1 



FINE ARTS DIVISION 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA 153 3 

GSB 153 3 

GSC-1 (waive) 

GSD 152 3 

Mus 107 4 

Mus (private applied) .. 2 
Mus (class instrument 

or voice) 1-2 

Mus (major ensemb le) 1 

17-18 

GSA 253 3 

GSB 253 J or 257 3 

GSC 252 3 

GSD 157, 175, or 178 .. 3 

Mus 207 3 

Mus (private applied) .. 1 
Mus (class instrument 

or voice) 1 

Mus (major ensemble) 1 



18 18 

Missing: GSD Math or FL sequence, GSE 251, and PE (3 hours). 
1 Recommended sequence, inasmuch as Introductory Psychology is included. 



18 



64 



SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 



MUSIC PERFORMANCE 



FALL HOURS 
GSA 151 3 

GSB 151 3 

GSC-1 (waive) 

GSD 153 3 

Mus 105 4 

Mus (private applied) .. 3 

Mus (major ensemble) _l_ 

17 



GSA 251 3 

GSB 251 or 255 3 

GSC 255 3 

Mus 205 3 

Mus (private applied) .. 4 
Mus (class piano or sec- 
ondary instrument) .. 1 
Mus (major ensemble) 1 

18 



First Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSA 152 3 

GSB 152 3 

GSC-1 (waive) 

GSD 151 3 

Mus 106 4 

Mus (private applied) .. 3 

Mus (major ensemble) 1 

17 

Second Year 

GSA 252 3 

GSB 252 or 256 3 

GSC 251 3 

Mus 206 3 

Mus (private applied) .. 4 
Mus (class piano or sec- 
ondary instrument) .. 1 
Mus (major ensemble) 1 

18 



18 18 

Missing: GSD Math or FL sequence, GSE 251, and PE (3 hours). 



FINE ARTS DIVISION 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA 153 3 

GSB 153 3 

GSC-1 (waive) 

GSD 152 3 

Mus 107 4 

Mus (private applied) .. 3 

Mus (major ensemble) 1 

17 

GSA 253 3 

GSB 253 or 257 3 

GSC 252 3 

Mus 207 3 

Mus (private applied) .. 4 
Mus (class piano or sec- 
ondary instrument) .. 1 
Mus (major ensemble) _J_ 

18 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



EDUCATION DIVISION 



FALL HOURS 

GSA 151 3 

GSB 151 3 

GSC 153 3 

GSD 151 3 

GSD Math 3 

PE 1 

PE 1 _1 

16 

GSA-2 3 

GSB 251 3 

GSC 251 3 



First Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSA 152 3 

GSB 152 3 

GSC 152 3 

GSD 152 3 

GSD Math 3 

PE 1 

PE 1 _l 

16 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA 153 3 

GSB 153 3 

GSC 151 3 

GSD 153 3 

GSD Math 3 

PE 1 

PE 1 J. 

16 

GSA-2 3 

GSB 253 3 

GSC 253 3 

Electives 6-8 

15-17 15-17 15-17 

1 Selected activity courses and methods at the 100 level as worked out with physical edu- 
cation advisers. 



Electives 



6-8 



Second Year 

GSA-2 3 

GSB 252 3 

GSC 252 3 

GSE 251 3 

Electives 3^4 



PHYSICS (WITH MATHEMATICS) 

EDUCATION OR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY DIVISION 



FALL HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSB-1 3 

GSD 151 3 

PE 1 

Chem 111 5 

Math 150 1 _5 

17 



First Year 

WINTER HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSB-1 3 

GSD 152 3 

PE 1 

Chem 112 5 

Math 151 a _5 

17 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA-1 (waive) 

GSB-1 3 

GSD 153 3 

PE 1 

Chem 113 5 

Math 252 1 _4 

16 



BACHELOR'S DEGREE CURRICULA, EDWARDSVILLE 



65 



GSC-1 3 

GSD FL 3 

Math 253 4 

Phys297 _5 

15 



Second Year 

GSB-2 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD FL 3 

Math 305 3 

Phys298 _5 

17 



GSB-2 3 

GSC-1 3 

GSD FL 3 

Math 306 3 

Phys 299 _5 

17 



Missing: GSC-2 sequence, GSB-2 (3 hours), and GSE 251. 

^ne who has not received advanced standing should take a GSD Math sequence. 



PSYCHOLOGY 



FALL HOURS 
GSA 151 3 

GSB 151 3 

GSC 152 3 

GSD 153 3 

GSD Math 3 

PE _]. 

16 

GSA-2 3 

GSB 251 3 

GSC 251 3 

Electives 3-4 

GSE 251 3 

15-16 



EDUCATION OR SOCIAL SCIENCES DIVISION 

First Year 



WINTER HOURS 

GSA 152 3 

GSB 152 3 

GSC 153 3 

GSD 151 3 

GSD Math 3 

PE J. 

16 
Second Year 

GSA-2 3 

GSB 252 3 

GSC 252 3 

Electives 6-8 



SPRING HOURS 

GSA 153 3 

GSB 153 3 

GSC 151 3 

GSD 152 3 

GSD Math 3 

PE _1 

16 



GSA-2 3 

GSB